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#1 of 24 Old 09-08-2011, 10:12 AM - Thread Starter
 
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i live in a city that is famous for being diverse. there is a large number of different ethnicities  as well as races (by race i mean the colour of skin here).

 

and yet there is so so so much social segregation that i really dont feel my city is a diverse city. it is a place where many different people live but there is not that much interaction which i think is key to diversity.

 

for instance we have white schools and asian schools and hispanic schools and ..... but not so much a school which has a greater percentage of mixed kids rather than the majority being of one ethnicity or race.

 

i go to school myself. when you walk into the cafeteria at lunch you will see a black table, a hmong table, a chinese table, a white table, a mexican table, a south american table, and yes one or two mixed tables. 

 

i see the same with neighborhoods. 

 

i see the same with churches as people come out of services. i see the same with grocery stores...

 

i am not even considering the few places i have travelled in the US because they had mostly one ethnic group and i didnt see so many people of colour. 

 

please know that i am not talking about 'everybody' but the majority.

 

so i question. are we truly diverse? i mean when you look at us of course we are diverse - but when you look at our interaction you will notice we are still very segregated. 

 

i feel like we are like europe, not like the melting pot that we are famously supposed to be.

 

has this been your experience too? what do you think?

 

 


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#2 of 24 Old 09-08-2011, 11:50 AM
 
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I really don't know, in some ways. Vancouver has a rep as a diverse city, but our largest "ethnic" population (I hate that phrasing, but I'm not sure how to put it) is Asian, and the majority of the Asian population are located in one of two municipalities. Honestly, most of the people I see around here are white.

 

OTOH, our neighbours a couple of doors down (we live in a townhouse complex) are from the Phillipines, and another neighbour is a biracial family (also mixed religious beliefs, as he's Christian and she's Muslim...except that the kids don't eat pork, I'm not sure what belief structure they're being raised in). DS1's group of friends is mostly white, but one of his best friends is Chinese, although I'm not sure if he was born here or not. I know his parents immigrated, and ds1's friend has been here at least since he was five, as they were in kindergarten together. Another old friend is of Japanese background, but I don't know if he was born here or not, either. DS1 has also had a couple of First Nations friends, although they've lost touch over the years. He had a couple of friends who were here as foreign exchange students last year - one was from Mexico, but I can't remember where the girl was from. He was also recently a "rose" at a friend's Fililpino debut. So, I'm not sure how diverse our city/area actually is, but ds1's circle of friends was reasonably diverse. (He's just started university, and a few of his friends have moved away for school, so his circle is kind of in transition right now.)

 

I don't really have a circle of friends, outside the local homelearning community, and they're almost all white. I went to the same school ds1 attended, and it was also predominantly white. There were 3-4 black students (in a school population of about 1,100), a few dozen Asian students, a couple dozen Indian (actually, mostly from Africa, but of Indian background) students....but the vast majority were white. And, yeah - my own group of friends back then was almost completely white.People do seem to group according to ethnicity a lot, although it certainly wasn't intentional.

 

The workplace? At my last job, I was the only person in my department who was born in Canada, and there were only two of us who were of European background. The place I worked before that...two whites, one woman from Sri Lanka, one from Kenya, one from San Salvador, and a guy (yes - the only one in the office) who was Chinese Canadian. I'd say workplaces here are quite diverse, but people seem to fall back into ethnic groups in their downtime. I'm not sure why it happens (especially as the last group I mentioned were/are the only group of coworkers I ever considered to be friends, as well as work colleagues).


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#3 of 24 Old 09-08-2011, 03:59 PM
 
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It's dreadful. Really. This area is Caucasian, very, and the next group would be Hispanic. I basically grew up here, and as a child there were like 2 black families. The odd thing? Less than 2 hrs from here it's way more diverse, as in other races/ethnic groups are present, but I can't really account for how well the mix and flow are there.


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#4 of 24 Old 09-08-2011, 09:10 PM
 
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I live in a rural area that is predominantly caucasian.  There are a few hispanic families, but not many.  My son is the only black kid in his school.

 

That said, the area I live in is very diverse in terms of the economic situation of the families.  The most advantaged families are prominent farming families that own thousands and thousands of acres.  There are also affluent families where one or both of the parents commute to white collar suburban jobs.  But there are also many families where parents are un- or underemployed and people are struggling to feed their families. 

 

I know that this probably doesn't sound great, but I really appreciate the fact that I'm raising my kids in this sort of environment.  There isn't as much pressure to conform or consume as when we lived in the suburbs where race was less uniform but incomes were higher.  My kids are judged based on the kind of friend they are, instead of the brand of clothes they wear or the type of car I drive. 


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#5 of 24 Old 09-08-2011, 10:30 PM
 
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I think of it as very white here, and my thought was the black population is about 2.8%.  So I checked the recent census data, and according to the 2010 census data for my county, there are 421,407 people here, 96.2 define themselves as one race, 3.8 as two or more races.

76.9% white of which 10.9% are Latino and 66% are not Latino

2.3%  black

1.7% American Indian or Alaska Native

5.2% Asian (2.3% define themselves as Filipino)

0.6 % Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander

0.3 % some other race

3.8% mixed race

 

22.2 % Latino of any race

 of which 10.9% are white and 11.2% are non-white

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#6 of 24 Old 09-08-2011, 11:26 PM
 
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I'm not in too many social situations to really gauge interaction, but I definitely think the area I live is quite diverse! At least by population alone, and what I observe out and about. At my church, its definitely mostly white. Moms groups (AP) mostly, but not ALL, white. Interestingly.. in our neighborhood, there's NO other white kids besides mine! At least not who I've met/seen around. This is out of like, 4-5 families I think? dd plays with the neighbor kids almost every day. It rocks. I'm especially pleased since when we first moved in and she saw them playing outside, and I was going to take her out to introduce ourselves, she said "I don't want to play with black kids!" and it stunned me silent because I just don't know where she got that :( Well, she has fully recovered from that attitude :D She doesn't care what color her friends are now, I can barely get the kid to come inside for meals. 


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#7 of 24 Old 09-09-2011, 12:28 AM - Thread Starter
 
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so i am a little lost here. i guess i am bringing up two different points?!!! someone help me out with this.

 

one is diversity. that is the presence of different kinds (of people) in this case within a certain geographic area.

 

what word should i use for interaction - between the communities?

 

i guess i am not so much talking so much about diversity - but more about the intermingling of the diverse group with different groups other than their own. 

 

i cant think of one word that means the intermingling of different groups. 

 

here i have purposely limited the definition to traditional definition of diversity. i am not even going to the other groups of people. 

 

you know you dont really need to mix socially to figure out the intermingling.

 

for instance there are about 50% white, 15% black and asian and 20% hispanic. i dont see this reflected for instance in our schools. i expect to see at least half of dd's classmates to be non white. nope not happening. some kind of churches have more black membership and some white. i have yet to see anyplace which reflects the statistic above. 

 

dunno is it wrong of me to want to see the same % in all our social institutions - like schools, churches, coffee shops?!!!

 

or even just one place. one event. but its either black, white or asian. 

 

funnily enough dd and i have a v. v. v. diverse social life - including two daddies and also another family of two mommies, disabled, etc. so she is exposed to a lot of it (hadnt planned it that way but its how it all worked out). and i definitely think it plays a v. important role in her life. the reason why she learnt her continents and countries were because someone was from there or had families from there so they became personal places for her. i think the idea that how can you 'hate' someone when they are your family is happening here. i think it really helps her not be so prejudiced. 

 

and if someone is trying to cross the divide by being outside the box they are punished.... so much going on there. i dont mean couples. that is an accepted norm. but if one wants to adopt some cultural 'norms' - like an asian wear baggy pants 

 

i dont want to have a 'everyone happy getting along with everyone situation'. and it doesnt mean there should be no italian town, or china town, etc. its wonderful to have a russian bakery or a thai bakery or an asian grocery store. but why dont we see many non russians going into the russion grocery store for instance. 


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#8 of 24 Old 09-09-2011, 07:59 AM
 
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I live in a very diverse city, but there are definitely "ethnic" neighbourhoods, as well as areas that are very mixed. I think it is natural for people to anchor themselves in familiar communities for safe harbours where they can enjoy their well-loved, traditional cultures. The "melting pot" concept always seemed wrong-headed to me. Blending and blurring together in order to create some bland, monolithic environment is something out of dystopian fiction. Of course, with diverse cultures, the huge difficulty is in building strong bridges between communities, providing equitable access and opportunities, and defining an overall, mutually agreeable system of values and rules. I don't have specific answers, but I'd rather live in a place that respects and even celebrates the differences rather than tries to erase them. Not that that is what you are suggesting, OP, just that I see that as an undesirable result of the "melting pot".

 

 

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#9 of 24 Old 09-09-2011, 04:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post

 

but I'd rather live in a place that respects and even celebrates the differences rather than tries to erase them. Not that that is what you are suggesting, OP, just that I see that as an undesirable result of the "melting pot".

yeah you are right. i dont want to erase the differences. i want them to meet more to blend. but it seems to me the shaded venn diagram is very slim where i am. i want to see more shading. there was a old car show near us. the type of cars mostly owned by hispanics. and the people who came to the show were mostly hispanics. during labor day weekend there was a gold rush day celebration (WHY choose a painful and inglorious time in history to raise funds i dont know) with lots of free events. i hardly saw any blacks or asians there. 

 

i want to see more of the edges blurred. i want to see it reflect in education where we look at different ways others do it and try it out in our schools. 
 

 


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#10 of 24 Old 09-10-2011, 09:04 AM
 
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Interesting questions, meemee.  I live in a large city consisting of five different boroughs and each borough has its own character.  I view Manhattan as fairly homogenous simply because it has the highest concentration of wealthy people, which consists of overwhelmingly white (non-hispanic) white people, both blue blood type and professionals.  Not to say that there aren't middle income, working class and poor who live in Manhattan, but real estate prices often dictate who lives where and real estate in Manhattan is pricey.  I live in Brooklyn, which along with Queens, could be viewed as the biggest 'melting pot' in the world.  Even in Brooklyn, however, neighborhoods tend to be based on ethnics, religion and race.  For instance, we have several large neighborhoods here which are almost strictly orthodox Jewish.  Asian neighborhoods tend to cater to Asian services as well as Hispanic neighborhoods.  People tend to mark their territories based on services they need in their own communities and their first language.  

 

My own neighborhood is interesting in that it was once strictly Norwegian, then the Italian Americans moved in, now it is a huge mix of Italian Americans, Arab Americans, Latinos (mostly Mexican) Asians and other types (of all backgrouonds and race) who have migrated here based on affordability and lay of the land.  I've seen the change in the last 20 years.  A lot of Arab Americans (either Muslim or Egyptian Coptic or Christian Lebanese) have moved here because of the way the neighborhood looks - it is right on the sea and I've been told many times over that the place reminds of them of home (either Alexandria or Lebanon).  

 

Unlike twenty or thirty years ago, when black and white neighborhoods were strictly segregated, I would say that the borders are starting to merge and blend.  Some of this is due to economics, some is due to social change, some is due to demand for housing all over the city, and I would even argue that 9/11 brought a lot of New Yorkers together in a way that would be absent if it had not happened.  We may have differences but we stick together when the going gets tough.  Maybe that's human nature but to witness it first hand in the last 10 years is a marvel to watch.  

 

(Edited to say that I may have painted a somewhat rosey picture above about diversity in my town.  It is not so rosey in a lot of respects but it is a heck a lot better than it used to be in terms of race relations.  When I moved here 20 years ago, things were much different, and worse, as far as relations between groups.  It has gotten better but we still have a long way to go).


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#11 of 24 Old 09-10-2011, 11:36 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post


i want to see more of the edges blurred. i want to see it reflect in education where we look at different ways others do it and try it out in our schools. 
 

 

 

Blurring the edges can be very difficult. I spent my day yesterday with a homelearning group that I belong to. I've known all of them for less than three years, most of them for only about a year, and one of them I just met yesterday. I was completely comfortable, and we were all very relaxed and easy together. That's because, although we come from somewhat different parent cultures (all white, and all North American, but a variety of regional backgrounds, socioeconomic upbringings, education levels, etc.), we all have similar family cultures in key ways. Within that framework of similarity, we can explore our differences in viewpoints and attitudes. There are different religious/spiritual values (eg. I'm not particularly spiritual, and one of these friends starts every day with a series of spiritual rituals and has had extensive shamanic training), approaches to food (I'm a fairly mainstream eater in many ways, one of them is vegetarian, one is a TF'er ,and one eats only organic and is moving towards TF), some parenting/family values (one tv-free family, two no guns families - we do watch tv, and my kids are allowed to play with guns, one allows swords, but only foam, one mom weaned her youngest at 15 months, one is still nursing at almost 4, etc. etc.). The differences are interesting, and we're all completely cool with one another's approach to things. But, we began to interact in the first place, because of our similarities, not our differences. We're all homeschooling families, and we're all at least somewhat unschooly (one family are radical unschoolers, but the rest aren't). We're all very "live and let live" types. We're looking for certain qualities in the people we spend time with, and have found them in this particular group.

 

I know this doesn't bear directly on your question, meemee...I think I'm getting there (was thinking about this yesterday at our meetup).

 

Cultural differences can make it really difficult to socialize and interact freely. Have you read some of the threads about manners and etiquette here over the years? Even between posters who were all born and reared in North America, the different opinions as to what constitutes acceptable behaviour are very noticeable. These are largely regional issues, with probably some socioeconomic aspects thrown in to the mix. When you add in the bigger regional differences that come with having been born and reared in a completely different country, with a radically different cultural tradition, possibly/probably different dominant religious views, etc., there are minefields everywhere. While I don't think it's a great idea to only expose oneself to people who think just like one, it can be very complicated to spend time around people with a completely different cultural expectation of behaviour.

 

One example that comes to mind is something I hear categorized under "open, warm, friendly", etc. I've heard people comment on these qualities being associated with several different cultures, and have noticed it myself with several people (my former Sri Lankan coworker, a couple of Mexican people I've met, several of the Filipino people I've worked with and/or lived near). These people seem to come from a more open, warm, and welcoming, in many ways, culture than my own. And, I love that. I really do. But - and it's a big but - I'm naturally fairly reserved until I get to know people well. I once saw a documentary that said that Canadians have the biggest "bubble" of personal space of any nationality, and I think mine may be even bigger than average. So, the warm, welcoming cultural impulses present in people of several ethnicities cause them to unknowingly invade my personal space all. the. freaking. time. I know it's a cultural difference. I know they're not being rude or doing it intentionally. But, they're still in my space! That makes me tense and uncomfortable. And, it's a very difficult thing to communicate to someone, without seeming to brush them off/push them away. Likewise, my Sri Lankan friend brings a gift every time she visits - even if it's a very casual visit. It would probably never occur to me to do that (I'm familiar with host/hostess gifts, although my circle has never really gone in for them much - but she takes it to another level). I can't help but wonder if she'd have felt somewhat rejected if she'd invited me over and i'd showed up without anything, yk? (For several reasons, I've only met with her on "neutral" ground or at our place, and haven't been invited to her home.) Again...it's a potential wall, but it's a difficult one to bring into the open without upsetting people.

 

I have no desire to avoid people from different cultural backgrounds than mine, but I'm also very bad at meeting people, anyway. The only way I've found to do that is to ease in through mutual interests, background, etc. In the last few years, that's been the homelearning community. And, so far, at least, the vast majority of the people I've met throught that route have been white, American/Canadian, and of Western European background (usually at least a couple of generations back...my maternal grandmother came here from England when she was 16, but my other non-white ancestors have been here for about two hundred years). There really haven't been any people of other ethnicities to meet, let alone interact with.

 

I had an actual point, but now I can't remember what it was, so I'll just post this as a random ramble, I guess. Random rambles are my specialty, anyway.


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#12 of 24 Old 09-12-2011, 12:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Storm Bride i absolutely love.gif you

 

but i am also very envious of your articulation skills. i wish i had some tooredface.gif

 

you brought up some great points (talking about the 'not-obvious' diversity issues is its own can of worms) and i was trying to find a good way of describing the  "open, warm, friendly" culture and you found the perfect words for me.

 

but unfortunately i have to get back to my hw and so i will come back to this a little later.

 

meshing of two cultures is not easy i understand. but if kids are not exposed to them at school when will they ever learn? i guess for me its v. important to have the interaction at a young age or even college because after that i notice its not really easy because of all the social walls one builds up as an adult.


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#13 of 24 Old 09-12-2011, 08:33 PM
 
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I would say it is very real here lots of different ethinicities here fr sure:)

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#14 of 24 Old 09-20-2011, 06:12 PM
 
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Weighing in late on the conversation.  Has anyone seen this?

 

http://www.salon.com/news/politics/war_room/2011/03/29/most_segregated_cities/slideshow.html

 

Maybe "diversity" is a meaningless concept where there's segregation 


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#15 of 24 Old 09-20-2011, 09:16 PM
 
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I live in a very diverse area, about 30 minutes outside of San Francisco.  

 

When I go to the playground behind my house there is almost always one hispanic family, one black family, one asian family and us (we're caucasian.)  The children that come to the playground without parents, 8 or 9 year olds, are always in mixed racial groups (asian/black/hispanic/white.)  Though there are less whites people in the neighborhood so sometimes there is not a 'white kid' running around.  The neighborhood itself is historically and predominately black.  My immediate neighbors are a mix of India Indian, Caucasian, asian, black and Persian.  It is not a closely nit neighborhood on my particular street mainly because it is on a busy road, but we all know eachother.  Socioeconomically the neighborhood is a mix of working class and business class with an average house value probably around 300K (this is afterall the bay area).  The elementary school that we are zoned for is predominately black and I think 15% caucasian, the rest mostly made up of hispanic and asian. 

 

I would say that in my neighborhood the different 'races/ethnicities' are truly integrated together.  

 

Personally I find socioeconomic status to be a much harder divide to bridge than racial or ethnic differences.    What I mean is that the people I meet and connect with are much more likely to have a similar household income to me than be the same race as me.


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#16 of 24 Old 09-21-2011, 10:24 AM
 
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I used to teach in a suburb of Boston with students that spoke over 30 languages amongst them. It was very diverse--really and truly. Kids didn't bat an eye at each others' cultural differences, and I LOVED that about the school. Now I teach in Maine and this community is SO white it's a little unsettling, actually. The only diversity in this school is a result of international adoption. All of the parents are white. We try to teach the kids about different people and cultures, but it's pretty superficial without any real life experience.

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#17 of 24 Old 09-21-2011, 10:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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 All of the parents are white. We try to teach the kids about different people and cultures, but it's pretty superficial without any real life experience.

i was talking to a social worker today. and yup he said the same thing as u ecoteat. teaching children without real life experience IS pretty superficial.

 

we ended up talking about bias and segregation (he is a sociology major) and he sees it all at work. 

 

i see it at school myself all the time. my history of mexico is a v. happening class coz we have many actively participating latinas in my class, whilst my history of slavery is a v. 'whitewashed' (pardon my pun) class where the prof has to ask leading questions to get the group to think. she has another class on US history and she has a few blacks and latinas in her class that make the class v. lively.  for instance at our class anyone can talk about la malinche glowingly and no one will bat an eyelid. u say that in my other class and people will 'jump' you verbally. 

 

i have discovered without personal experience many people have strange biases against other groups. 

 

goldingoddess - the divide btw the rich and poor goes back a long way. we see how our president struggles over this. except in certain religions like islam and thus countries i can't see divide going away any time soon. i myself am party to that i did not send my dd to our neighborhood school. not because of the income level but because of the violence that existed. unfortunately i found low income and violence seem to go hand in hand.
 

 


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#18 of 24 Old 09-22-2011, 11:55 AM
 
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I haven't read most of the comments but I wanted to put in my two cents.

 

I have lived in two places in my life that I have felt were truly diverse in every way.  And I have also lived in areas that were "diverse" but the diversity was segregated like you describe.  The two really do feel different.

 

I grew up in Hawaii, where people are completely integrated.  There are certainly communities that immigrants from specific locations moved to and are dominated by certain ethnic groups.  However, the lines are very fuzzy and people from all races live everywhere.  When I went to school, race played no role in friends and social groups.  The only real exception to this was not based on race but could be perceived to be and that was that the military families often were co-located and formed their own social groups.  College in a big city on the east coast was a very difficult culture shock to me, because while there were lots of ethnicities around, they tended to socialize within each other and I found it very confusing.

 

Now I am living in NYC and in the area we are in, I feel more at home like I am back in Hawaii.  Except the culture is very different - lol.  My 1st grade DD has friends from all races.  They completely mix.  She is Irish with flaming red hair.  Her best friends at the moment are 1 African American, 1 child from the Virgin Islands (also African American), 1 child whose family is from Peru, and 1 child whose family is Hispanic (have been here many generations).  I love it to be honest.  I feel so much safer somehow when everyone is mixed together and there are no feelings of "us" and "them".

 

So I guess I am saying that I completely get what you are saying...


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#19 of 24 Old 09-22-2011, 09:52 PM
 
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Not very diverse here, which is odd since we have a huge Military population. Oh well, we're going back to the Northwest soon and I know it'll be the same... just paler.
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#20 of 24 Old 09-23-2011, 09:20 AM
 
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I was thinking that our city is pretty good at integrating the diverse populations. The playground near our home draws black, white & hispanic kids. Ditto the neighborhood branch of the public library. DD's pre-school is mostly white, but not entirely. There are a LOT of lesbian families in our neighborhood. We want her to go to public school precisely because we want her to experience diversity, and our neighborhood elementary school will definitely fit the bill. We live in kind of a "transitional" neighborhood, so I think that's part of it. There's Section 8 housing in our neighborhood, but also lots of owner-occupied houses & apartments. The housing stock in our neighborhood includes a lot of "starter" homes (which is why we're there!).

 

As I think about this more, I realize that I want DD to be exposed to a lot of diversity, but I'm not sure how well we're modeling that for her. I like it that we can go to the park or the library & she can interact & play with kids of different colors (and I can chat with the parents). But the reality is, our friends are all kind of like us...white, educated, (lower-ish) middle class, lefty-leaning, either lesbian/gay or non-homophobe, mostly non-religious, and tend to be artists, teachers, or to work for non-profits. We shop at farmer's markets & the co-op grocery, ride bikes, compost our kitchen waste, buy local, donate to public radio...I mean really, we're not total clones of each other, but I can see how it might appear that way.

 

So, I embrace diversity in my head, and I like being in an urban milieu where I can "bump into" diversity on a regular basis, but when it comes to the people that I invite over to dinner, or meet for coffee, or "do lunch" with, it's pretty much all folks who are very similar to me. Is that OK? I don't know.

 

Storm Bride's ramble brings up a lot of excellent food for thought. It is a really complex thing.


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#21 of 24 Old 09-23-2011, 11:24 AM
 
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In my actual town, no.  You won't find much diversity (sadly).  There's more diversity in cities nearby.

 

This is one of the reasons I miss Providence.  Lots of diversity, and it's a positive thing (for the most part.)


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#22 of 24 Old 09-23-2011, 11:30 AM
 
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I went to a diverse school but we had the "table" issue too-- Taiwanese at one table, Japanese at another, Orthodox Jews at another. 

 

Where I currently live is very diverse, many ethnicities and backgrounds.  Many schools are segregated since the pricier neighborhoods and school zones tend to be white/asian, the poorer black. hispanic, but there are some schools that are about a 1:1:1 ratio of black, white, hispanic. 

 

I can't remember where but I read an article somewhere that diversity within neighborhoods actually makes people isolate themselves more (like the table phenomena).

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#23 of 24 Old 09-23-2011, 09:48 PM
 
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Not very

 

  • White alone - 140,107 (89.1%)
  • Black alone - 5,471 (3.5%)
  • Hispanic - 4,711 (3.0%)
  • Two or more races - 3,814 (2.4%)
  • Asian alone - 2,414 (1.5%)
  • American alone - 388 (0.2%)
  • Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander alone - 102 (0.06%)
  • Other race alone - 73 (0.05%)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
I really loved it when we went to chicago and there were so many different cultures and foods there

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#24 of 24 Old 09-25-2011, 11:43 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CI Mama View Post

So, I embrace diversity in my head, and I like being in an urban milieu where I can "bump into" diversity on a regular basis, but when it comes to the people that I invite over to dinner, or meet for coffee, or "do lunch" with, it's pretty much all folks who are very similar to me. Is that OK? I don't know.


here's the thing CI. if there was a little more integration you probably would have had other friends. i am absolutely not encouraging the melting pot. a certain amount of segregation (or should i use another term) is necessary but the integration needs to happen at a certain level. when i was working and my friends were limited to around that group i too had v. little diversity in my friends group. but as i started getting more active in activities around me, started going to school my friends circle changed. if i had remained married i would NOT have had diverse friends. my ex's hobbies were expensive ones and mine at that time was the outside which had limited integration. i look at meetup groups around me around certain interests and yes they are usually segregated too. 

 

i guess the reason why i push integration over segregation because of the political divide and thus the divide between the rich and poor increases. 

 

i know in some cities when the freeways were being planned they purposely set it up so that it totally bypassed the ghetto so that it can be its own little corner and people would not pass by there unless they lived in and around the neighborhood. its almost one group wants to keep another group at its place. fortunately for the asians they get the 'easier' route and having access to good education means they are not discriminated against so much. but i look at the blacks, hispanics and native americans - its a whole different story. the low income housing that we have here again follows a policy of segregation. 

 

our local organic farm, the organic stores - a v. v. v. small minority is black. when there are black children who are doing fundraising for their project outside these stores - i notice they are dressed better AND not that many people stop to talk to them. and funnily enough it was a white friend who after stopping and talking to them pointed this out to me. and we are the most diverse city in the country. and thus lies my own feelings around local food. i'm torn about it coz i can take part in it, BUT however everyone does not have equal opportunity to it. 

 

my concern is what we see in our schools, our playgrounds is reflected in our policies. which is sad. 

 


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