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#31 of 43 Old 02-13-2011, 06:04 PM
 
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Hey Marci,

I've been to the home where your little man is being cared for. When we were there, I did not see any formula. They seemed to be feeding the babies powdered whole milk, but maybe we just didn't see it. There are a fridge, running water and electricity - which means the home is middle class by Ugandan standards - but it's also very simple. Think one bare lightbulb in a room, concrete floors and walls, several people sharing each bed. The women caring for the children seem to be working very hard to do their best. We're connecting them to a woman who works with malnourished babies to hopefully get them some training how to care for these kids. Maybe that will help your little guy to be healthier by the time he comes home!

 

Have you asked them if you could buy them formula? It's very expensive in the US, so if you could have someone bring it over for you it would be less expensive.

 

It's normal for babies over 6 months in Uganda to stop drinking formula and to switch to cows milk. For another baby who is currently in that home (she weighs 9 pounds at 8 months), we taught them how to make F-100, what the world health organization suggests for refeeding malnourished babies. We also bought them olive oil to add to cereals and encouraged them to feed her bananas, cooked potatoes and other soft foods. Avocado is available and not expensive in Uganda too. Another great oil for them to add to things is coconut.

 

We're trying to figure out the whole formula thing back home too! I am going to try to relactate and to pump as much milk as possible. If baby girl wants to breastfeed, that would be great, but even if she doesn't I'm planning to give her breastmilk. We have lots of friends having babies soon too, so I'm hoping a few would sign up to donate a couple bottles a week. Beyond that, I think we'll use organic formula if we need to, but probably also transition to lots of healthy solid foods quickly.

 -Sara

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#32 of 43 Old 02-13-2011, 06:19 PM
 
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The recipe for F100 made with whole dried milk is 110 g whole dried milk, 50 g sugar, 30 g oil and 20 ml of an electrolyte/mineral solution with water added up to fill 1000 ml. We could not find a good way to get them the electrolyte/mineral solution, so we just gave them instruction for making the rest of the F100.

 

We weren't able to as precise as I would like to, as I have no idea what types of measuring cups they have! But one way or another, if they are adding sugar and olive oil to the formula, the baby will be getting more calories...

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#33 of 43 Old 02-14-2011, 06:26 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks SO much Sara. I'll chat with you about his care later.

And thank you all so much for the good thoughts and perspective. It is good to know that there are things we can do to make bottle feeding a benefit!


Marci

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Married to my best friend, homeschooling, gardening,

running a camp for at-risk kiddos and walking a narrow path.

 

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#34 of 43 Old 02-15-2011, 04:24 AM
 
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Having been a mom who had exclusively breastfed for 2 years and continued to nurse dd for what seemed like forever afterward, it was a real challenge for me to think of formula feeding my adopted son.  I did do the Goldfarb protocol successfully, while we were waiting to adopt ds. I induced lactation and pumped every two hours, getting a little at a time.  I had NO idea if ds would take to the breast, I didn't even know how old he would be when we were finally able to adopt him, but I put away the bits of milk in the freezer and it became, ultimately, quite the gold mine!

 

Anywho... DS was from Rwanda and we got him at 7 months.  He was 10 pounds at that time, and severely malnourished.  He had been fed formula at the orphanage, and I arrived with leaky breasts.  He would NOT take to the breast and while I absolutely did use formula in country, I was so relieved to get home and be able to thaw the breast milk for him.  Milk went into the bottle, we bottle nursed,and voila!  I was elated that he was getting the good nutrition, and it was important for me to know that I could directly nourish my child.  

 

It was sooo much work and emotionally draining to induce lactation.  And I was so glad I did it.  I felt so powerful being able to give him something from my body (I was not physically able to birth or later carry a child) finally, and I know that he benefitted from getting whatever amounts of antibodies and yumminess that he did.  I still needed formula, and that was okay.  But man did I feel great about giving what I could of my breastmilk.

 

I'm offering this only because I know how much I benefitted from reading the variety of responses and experiences here when I was waiting to adopt.  I certainly agree that in adoption you do what you need to do, and honestly you have to let go of a lot.  Breastfeeding was one of those things that I needed to mourn the loss of.    But I found a way, for me, to nourish him a bit from my own body, and that was really important and meaningful to me starting out with him.

 

None of this is to imply that in these situations, breast is best or even possible.  For me, it was best.  And it was such a relief to read here and know that it is okay to formula feed, that babies turn out... that what really grows this adopted child is love!

 

Much luck to you!

 


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#35 of 43 Old 02-15-2011, 07:36 AM
 
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hug.gif Jaya that is so sad he was so malnourished, poor baby.


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#36 of 43 Old 02-15-2011, 11:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by crystal_buffaloe View Post

This is just some gentle encouragement to avoid Nestle/Gerber formulas (unless, of course, that is all the baby will tolerate). Store brands are nutritionally equivalent, and by buying them you won't be lining the pockets of companies with unethical business practices.  

 

By the time the baby is 8 or 9 months old, you'll be able to offer high-fat, high-calorie solid foods as well, and full-fat goat or cow's milk yogurt might be a good supplementary food.


Formulas are not included in the boycotts of the above mentioned companies. Nestle Good Start is actually a good choice for some babies as it is gentle on their tummy.

The best formula choice for any baby is the one that they thrive on and that isn't always the most politically correct brand.
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#37 of 43 Old 02-16-2011, 10:43 AM
 
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Bolding mine.

 

     Quote:

Originally Posted by TCMoulton View Post
 
Formulas are not included in the boycotts of the above mentioned companies. Nestle Good Start is actually a good choice for some babies as it is gentle on their tummy.

I was not aware of this. What is the reasoning? If it is because it is the only formula some babies will tolerate, I agreed with that in my post.

The best formula choice for any baby is the one that they thrive on and that isn't always the most politically correct brand.

Hopefully, probably, there is more than one formula choice that would allow the OP's son to thrive. She will most likely not be feeding him the same concoction they are in the orphanage (for very long, if at all), but that doesn't mean she has to start her search with Nestle because "it is gentle on their tummy." She has many other good options, including nutritionally equivalent store-brand formulas, organic formulas, homemade formulas, inducing lactation, donor breastmilk, goat milk and other supplementary foods as appropriate for this particular baby, or some combination of these.

 

Avoiding Nestle/Gerber is not about being "politically correct"; it's about protecting women and babies all over the world from businesses that put profit margins above health.


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#38 of 43 Old 02-16-2011, 09:08 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TCMoulton View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by crystal_buffaloe View Post

This is just some gentle encouragement to avoid Nestle/Gerber formulas (unless, of course, that is all the baby will tolerate). Store brands are nutritionally equivalent, and by buying them you won't be lining the pockets of companies with unethical business practices.  

 

By the time the baby is 8 or 9 months old, you'll be able to offer high-fat, high-calorie solid foods as well, and full-fat goat or cow's milk yogurt might be a good supplementary food.




Formulas are not included in the boycotts of the above mentioned companies. Nestle Good Start is actually a good choice for some babies as it is gentle on their tummy.

The best formula choice for any baby is the one that they thrive on and that isn't always the most politically correct brand.


It would seem that they are included.  Although they may not be the largest target, they are certainly one of the biggest reasons behind it.  Again, if Nestle is the only thing a baby will eat to survive, give it to them.  But as crystal_buffaloe said, they should definitely be at the bottom of the list of considered options if their corporate responsibility matters to you.  The only thing I saw on this list that I think might be an error are the Cheerios, I thought they were owned by General Mills, unless GM belongs to Nestle as well.

 

http://info.babymilkaction.org/nestleboycottlist

 

http://info.babymilkaction.org/nestlebriefing

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#39 of 43 Old 02-17-2011, 05:34 AM
 
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They are business partners and I believe they have 50 cereals together. Cascadia farms is organic and they are owned by GM too. FYI General Mills uses a ton of GMO ingredients as well so Cheerios we used to eat are not the same...


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#40 of 43 Old 02-17-2011, 06:19 AM
 
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The bottom line is, that you need to do what's best for your baby first. If it's breastmilk, great. If it's formula, great. If it needs to be Nestle, then that's how it needs to be.

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#41 of 43 Old 02-17-2011, 07:00 AM
 
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I breastfed my DS and while I would not have considered myself a "lactivist" my DH would probably beg to differ. I did have to realize that in the foster world, I was going to have to use formula. I had no clue what age placement we would get, when we woudl get them etc. I held DD 99% of the time I was giving her a bottle (there was a few one off times we were on a road trip or something). I always held her bottle. DD initially faced away from me for her bottles, but eventually it became a very nice relaxing time and she started to want to face me and even at 15 months when she stopped bottles, I was still holding her and holding her bottles. It can be very bonding. She would hold her bottles for other people, just not me and it was okay. Sometimes she likes me to still hold her sippy cups. Now, my new foster daughter is different, she wants/needs to be held very very close to the chest for bottles and it has to be the "perfect" position. I don't mind, I actually enjoy it and it can be a bonding experience. I look at her just like I did DS when he was nursing and her big brown eyes connect to me. It also takes her 20-30 minutes to finish a bottle.

I had a can of good start she didn't like it, she likes the enfamil. Funny how they can have strong preferences at such a young age.


Carly, mama to DS C (5th grade), DD Miss M (07/09, fostered 1/10, adopted 08/10), and Little Miss C (11/10, fostered 01/11, adopted 11/12). Foster Son, Mr. A, age 11 placed 10/13.
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#42 of 43 Old 02-22-2011, 07:05 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie View Post

The key is being willing to try different things.

I have three biokids, and for various reasons none of them have nursed a full year. One could tolerate only goat milk - all dairy formulas made him ill. One could tolerate only cow's milk - she spit out all formulas and goat's milk. One is apparently allergic to cow's milk and spits out goat's milk, but continues to drink dairy-based formula with gusto at 20 months.

So, if there was an 8 month old baby joining my family, I'd have a can of Earth's Best powdered formula, a can of Meyenburg powdered goat milk, and a can of cheapo Wal-Mart powdered formula on hand when he came home, plus some glass bottles with silicone nipples. If none of those three worked, I'd branch out into the world of liquid formulas and refrigerated goat milk.


Earth's Best formula and Wal-Mart's cheapo store brand are made by the same company, PBM nutritionals. (They also make Vermont Organics). Wal-Mart even sells an organic formula in their store brand.
PBM also makes the store brand formulas for Sams, Target, Walgreens, and BRU. They make standard formulas with DHA, formulas with DHA+prebiotics, soy, sensitive (which has broken-down proteins like Good Start), and I think a lactose-free one as well. Not all stores stock all varieties; around here Target usually has the best selection.


I wouldn't do the WAP formula. The WAPF page says you have to know the specific breed of cow, get the milk raw, and know that the cow is not diseased. Even if I wanted to do it, that would pretty much be impossible.


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#43 of 43 Old 02-22-2011, 06:31 PM
 
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Weird. Around here at least, the Earth's Best and the Wal-Mart powdered formulas are a different color and smell different when mixed. This is why I hate processed food.
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