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-   -   Hurrah for wonderful firsts! (http://www.mothering.com/forum/165-adoptive-foster-parenting/1317599-hurrah-wonderful-firsts.html)

Smithie 06-14-2011 01:31 PM

 

Update on page 3



I guess our license went through, because we Got The Call. The placement didn't sound permanent, but it met all of our criteria for possible permanence (age, gender, history) so we decided to go for it and see how things developed. 

 

His name is J. The CPS worker is on-scene executing the removal order, and will call you before drop-off.

 
OK. 

 

Twenty minutes later...

 

We can't find him.

 

Huh?

 

We found the baby and he's going to his foster family right now. We'll call you later tonight or tomorrow if we find J.

 

IF YOU FIND HIM? Is there another option besides finding him? Is there an indication that something bad has happened to him?

 

No, the parent just won't cooperate with law enforcement.

 


 

J, wherever you are tonight, I hope you are safe and well. candle.gif 

 

 

 


queenjane 06-14-2011 04:15 PM

I had a little 1 yr old girl once, they couldnt find her for awhile. The mom had given birth in the hospital to the youngest (who was maybe her fifth kid??) and he tested positive for drugs so they wouldnt let her take him home and said she had to turn over the other children. She hid them, where they dont know but they assume with relatives. It took them awhile to find all the kids, and i got the 1 yr old for a couple months.


Smithie 06-14-2011 06:16 PM

I'm hopeful that this case will resolve in that way - that J is hidden with maybe-sketchy but non-dangerous friends or relatives, and the social workers or cops will find him soon. 

 

Mom is going to jail, so the kids have got to be somewhere, and we're hoping to foster J for a few months minimum while they shake the family tree for suitable kinship matches, and/or line up an adoptive home that will take both the boys together. That's not us, but maybe it's the foster family that just took the toddler, or maybe it's somebody who's only taking post-TPR or TPR-track placements. Though it's not clear if the sibs are full or half, or if they've customarily resided together, so that may change how the workers prioritize placing them together in the long term. 

 

All this assuming that they find him. praying.gif


kayleesmom 06-15-2011 05:39 PM

praying the find J soon.


Smithie 06-15-2011 06:18 PM

 

He's been found. He's here. He's wonderful. He's temporary, I'm almost sure - a relative has already expressed interest in taking both boys. 


WifeMomChiro 06-15-2011 06:38 PM

I pray they find him safe and sound soon.

 


Smithie 06-16-2011 05:59 AM

 

He's found!

 

He had a hard time going to sleep - I had to crash on a camp cot in the hall, since the law in its infinite wisdom doesn't allow foster parents to room-share or bed-share with the shellshocked toddlers in their charge. Otherwise, pretty much the easiest transition in the history of foster care. 

 

 


Lakeeffectsnow 06-16-2011 06:17 AM

I'm glad they found him.  You are over sharing personal information of a foster child, it may be in violation of your agreement.  It sounds like you are excited and need someone to talk to about it.  Even my 87 year old great mother is on the internet these days. Nine year old kids have Face book accounts.


Smithie 06-16-2011 07:49 AM

Thanks for the advice, I'll edit. Hope those who are interested had a chance to read...


Polliwog 06-16-2011 08:10 AM

I don't know what you shared since I wasn't here but usually as long as you don't post identifying information or pictures, you'll be fine. That varies by location, though.

 

Smithie, it's a shame that kids can't be in a foster parent's room there. DD's crib was in my room for most of her first three years.


Smithie 06-16-2011 08:38 AM

I think what I posted was legally/contractually fine, but why not be cautious, eh? The last thing I need to is tick off these people (meaning workers, biofamily, whoever). 

 

I believe kids can room-share with an adult only until the age of 1 here. In any case, I had a had enough time getting my biokids to abandon the notion of cosleeping and go back to their own beds, and if I'd been in the room myself I'm pretty sure it would have been impossible. 


Smithie 06-16-2011 05:00 PM

One more night! 


Polliwog 06-17-2011 08:20 AM

My daughter was supposed to be here less than two weeks. But the relatives didn't pass the screening.


Smithie 06-17-2011 08:40 AM

 

Even if these maternal relatives don't pass, for J's sake I have to hope that he can placed long-term in the same home as his little brother. But if little brother gets a paternal kinship placement with a family unrelated to J, then I'll switch mental gears and start thinking about keeping J until reunification is resolved either way. 

 

Four kids at the pool - whew! Keeps you on your toes! 


Smithie 06-17-2011 01:45 PM

The emergency placement coordinator has apparently had enough of this case. She's kicking it to the regular workers, who will staff it Monday afternoon. I'll take J to the doctor, etc. 

 

Does anybody know if I serum tests for HIV, Hep, etc. are covered by Medicaid? Does that vary by state? I know I can get my ped to order them. 


Polliwog 06-17-2011 02:45 PM

I have no idea if Medicaid covers them but I'd check to see if you're allowed to have tests like that run.


sesa70 06-17-2011 08:13 PM


As far as I know (in Illinois at least) you need special permission in order to have a foster child screened for HIV and Hep. but of course it varies from state to state.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Smithie View Post

The emergency placement coordinator has apparently had enough of this case. She's kicking it to the regular workers, who will staff it Monday afternoon. I'll take J to the doctor, etc. 

 

Does anybody know if I serum tests for HIV, Hep, etc. are covered by Medicaid? Does that vary by state? I know I can get my ped to order them. 



 


Smithie 06-18-2011 06:02 AM

 

Special permission, huh? That should be fun to obtain. But give the high-risk history, hopefully reason will prevail on that one. Oh well, it can wait until a permanent worker is assigned. I'm not really worried about any of the rest of the family getting infected from casual contact, but about getting any chronic illness DXed and a treatment regimen started. Maybe mom will be tested while she's in custody, and the workers will be able to determine from that if testing for the kids is needed. 

 

 


Tigerchild 06-18-2011 04:47 PM

You shouldn't run elective tests/treatments on a foster child (and a temporary placement at that) without permission from the worker.  If you're that worried about infectious diseases, institute the proper cleaning/precautions.  Have gloves available if you need to treat a scrape and you have an open wound on your hands.  HIV is incredibly hard to transmit.  You may wish to think about immunizing your family (not your foster child, though it's likely they already have been) for Hep B.  Educate your children about best practices for first aid/bodily fluid clean up.

 

You may have access to a bloodbourne pathogens class through your agency (if not, they're required for child care workers in many states, so you can find low cost options when that's the case).

 

If you need bloodwork on every child coming in to your home, that's really something that you should make sure the workers know about.  You do NOT want to do it first and ask permission later, which would probably (rightly so) put your license at risk.

 

In any case, operating with common sense precautions is really something you should be doing anyway.  As much as this is unfair, unfortunately medical records get screwed up, information is not/mis-communicated, all kinds of weird stuff is going on.  It's good to get into the habit of using gloves to clean up blood and body fluids in general (it's not weird or impersonal, though until it becomes routine it might feel like it).  And if you do ever take care of a kid who has HIV, chances are a) there's no way you won't know it, because your life will be consumed with the medications (unless things have gotten a lot better than when I last took care of a kid on the meds) and b) YOU and your children are far more dangerous to that child than the other way around.  Hep B made me more nervous than HIV, to be honest.  But even then--it's unlikely to be a problem unless you regularly swap spit with a carrier or share needles.


lauren 06-18-2011 06:03 PM

Sending you hugs, Smithie, on your first placement. I hope you can catch your breath soon.


Smithie 06-18-2011 07:14 PM

Thanks, Lauren! Other than increased noise level there's not much to get used to.

Tigerhild, as I said above, I'm actually not concerned about transmission of illness to the other members of my family. I'm concerned that any serious chronic conditions, for which J is at high risk because Mom is an IV drug user, be identified now so that treatment can begin while J is in state custody. I have a few calls to make on Monday, and I may be able to ascertain vax status from the WIC office, which might as least take Hep B off the table.

Tigerchild 06-18-2011 07:23 PM

To be sure that the baby is protected from Hep B, you need to find out if both the vaccine and the immune globuline was given.  The vaccine alone does not prevent a baby from developing a chronic (carrier) infection in some cases.  Depending on how good health care for indigent folks is in your area, that may not have been given--esp. if the mom did not have a known status as someone who has Hep B.  To my knowledge the HBIG is NOT given routinely.


Smithie 06-19-2011 05:29 AM

 

By "baby," do you mean the younger sib who is also in care (age 18 months) or J (age 4.5)? Or both? Are you saying that a child who receives dose #1 of the regular Hep B vax at birth, plus subsequent shots at the behest of the WIC folks, might still have an infection if mom was a carrier?

 

If so, well, doesn't that suck. greensad.gif But thanks for the information - it will help me ask the right questions. 


Tigerchild 06-19-2011 12:42 PM

IF mom has an *active* Hep B infection, and IF she does indeed pass it to the baby...then yes, the baby needs the HBIG *in addition* to the vax at birth (as well as continuing the series of the vax after).  So yes, even kids who have been fully immunized can still be carriers if they never got the HBIG.  (Keep in mind that the last time I had to deal with this on a regular basis via foster parenting and caring for pregnant women in the corrections system was in the late 90s/early 00s--maybe things have changed, but I don't know.)  The baby/child would likely be a carrier though, NOT someone with an acute infection.  I think a mom who is just a latent carrier (not in an acute infection) is less likely to pass on the infection--but the women I worked with all had active hepB infections, not a carrier with no symptoms type of deal.

 

However, there are a lot of ifs in there.  Only a blood test will reveal for sure if a person is a carrier.  The good news is that many people can be carriers (esp those infections picked up neonatally) and have few if any long term health effects.  It is something that they should be aware of though so they can protect their own kids.

 

So a blood test is worth it even with vax history, IMO, but to be really blunt I think it would be wildly inappropriate to have one ordered without speaking to the worker first.  I think anyone who would do something like that on their own without getting anyone's consent really should have their license pulled.  Not being able to do whatever you want whenever you want (even things that might be 'common sense' to you) is part and parcel of being a foster parent, like it or not.


karne 06-19-2011 12:54 PM

You know, blood work, and even doctor's visits can be pretty traumatic for a child.  The child may have a history with medical procedures, or physicians that is difficult---I guess I am saying that it seems like the first order of business would be to create a safe place, and be a safe person for this young boy who has presumably had a lot of upheaval in the past few days. 

 

Not to tell you what to do, but if I were in your shoes, I would be extra careful to be partnering in a positive way with the worker.  Truly I don't know how this works where you are, but I would be very cognizant of the fact that this little boy may need you to be the safe one, and I wonder if that might mean that the worker would pick up the task of deciding about and implementing the physician visits, as they deem necessary.  Sometimes a split like that can be helpful.  Again, not sure if this is relevant in your situation.


Polliwog 06-19-2011 02:03 PM

Karne, it's standard practice here (and in many other places,) that the foster parent get a medical evaluation of the child when they first come into care (often within 48 hours.) It's rarely the social worker's job unless there's a real reason that it cant' be done. I wouldn't want a social worker to do it for me (although they are welcome to join us.) I want to help the child through these things and I want to build the relationship with the doctor (especially if it's one I haven't worked with before.)


Smithie 06-19-2011 03:35 PM

Yeah, I have until Wednesday to get J to a doctor, and to begin vaxes (unless WIC turns up a shot record that's current). Also, a dental abscess we found this weekend will need to be treated ASAP. If I DON'T initiate medical care, my license could get pulled. But I will certainly speak with the worker and get permission for serum tests. I had planned to bring her (or him) in on that one anyway - they patronize a specific lab for the drug tests (nothing like shaving a patch off a kid's head to make him feel safe and settled!) and write the orders directly to the lab. There may be a similar procedure in place for other common lab tests.

Y'all can calm down. ;-) I'm going to be a proactive foster parent, but I'm not going off the deep end, I promise. I'd just like to accomplish whatever can be accomplished while I'm driving the bus. I think I may actually be very good at this.

Polliwog 06-19-2011 04:28 PM

Does your state have a immunization registry? If so, it's really easy to find out if the kids are up to date.


karne 06-19-2011 06:18 PM



Quote:
Originally Posted by Polliwog View Post

Karne, it's standard practice here (and in many other places,) that the foster parent get a medical evaluation of the child when they first come into care (often within 48 hours.) It's rarely the social worker's job unless there's a real reason that it cant' be done. I wouldn't want a social worker to do it for me (although they are welcome to join us.) I want to help the child through these things and I want to build the relationship with the doctor (especially if it's one I haven't worked with before.)



Thanks Polliwog.  I wasn't sure what was appropriate in the circumstances, but your explanation clarifies that for me. Our situation was a bit different, and it was quite a while ago, so clearly, not applicable.


Smithie 06-19-2011 07:51 PM

Apparently, there is no immunization registry. Official shot records are generated by the child's pediatrician (hah, not likely) or by Public Health if shots were given there. Public Health holds your WIC checks ransom to force vaxing. I am suddenly less upset about that than I used to be.


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