3 beautiful waiting kids in Uganda... - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 12 Old 07-18-2012, 10:06 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm not sure if this is ok to post here -- I looked for the rules for this forum but couldn't find them... mods can remove if necessary...smile.gif

 

There are 3 waiting kids in Uganda, and the two older ones need a family quickly before I do something crazy and try to adopt them wink1.gif... here is a link to their featured profiles on Reece's Rainbow:

http://reecesrainbow.org/?s=africa

If anyone wants more details, here are links to the two different agencies you can use to adopt these kiddos... both program directors are great, from what I have heard from people who know these things... the kids are with the first agency, Amazing Grace Adoptions (http://www.agadoptions.org/international.php), but for NON-Christian families or single women, their files can easily be transferred to Across the World Adoptions (http://www.atwakids.org/uganda.html)-- the directors for these two agencies are a married couple, and they are very trustworthy, thorough, and ethical.... kids have been thoroughly vetted for adoptability, but I don't know their background beyond what is written on the RR site...

for more information about adopting HIV+ kids, go to http://www.projecthopeful.org/

spread the word, these kids have been waiting far too long!!!


We're Tiffani , Mark , Lucy (9/99) , Dexter (8/01) ,and Zachary Marvin (3/07) and Naomi Rose (6/09), home 11/10, by way of Ugandan adoption.

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#2 of 12 Old 07-23-2012, 09:57 AM
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I think it's fine to post this here. If anyone has any concerns about these agencies they can post to say so. 

 

Thanks! smile.gif


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#3 of 12 Old 10-03-2012, 09:14 AM
 
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International adoption is illegal in Uganda, so this seems really fishy to me.

 

My mother spends a month every year in a Ugandan orphanage and the only way to "adopt" kids there if you live outside of Uganda is to pay their school fees, health insurance, and buy them clothing and school supplies. 

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#4 of 12 Old 10-03-2012, 12:05 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mamma Mia View Post

International adoption is illegal in Uganda, so this seems really fishy to me.

 

It's not illegal. It's just difficult. Here's information from the U.S. State Department in an effort to provide facts from a legitimate source.

 

http://adoption.state.gov/country_information/country_specific_info.php?country-select=uganda


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#5 of 12 Old 10-03-2012, 12:15 PM
 
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International adoption is illegal in Uganda, so this seems really fishy to me.

My mother spends a month every year in a Ugandan orphanage and the only way to "adopt" kids there if you live outside of Uganda is to pay their school fees, health insurance, and buy them clothing and school supplies. 

Hmmm that's interesting considering the OP has actually adopted children from Uganda.

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#6 of 12 Old 10-03-2012, 03:20 PM
 
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Yes, they say that on the internet, and I hope that if it's true they did so my ethical means, but the reason Uganda has outlawed (at least in the past) international adoption is because Ugandan children have the right to grow up in their own culture with their own people. International adoption is essentially an extension of western colonialism in Africa.

 

I'll ask my mother about this because she will be in Uganda in a few weeks. As I understand, it is very frowned upon for western people in particular to adopt Ugandan children, I'll ask her what folks in the streets and in the orphanages think about it.

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#7 of 12 Old 10-03-2012, 04:54 PM
 
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Yes, they say that on the internet, and I hope that if it's true they did so my ethical means, but the reason Uganda has outlawed (at least in the past) international adoption is because Ugandan children have the right to grow up in their own culture with their own people. International adoption is essentially an extension of western colonialism in Africa.

 

I'll ask my mother about this because she will be in Uganda in a few weeks. As I understand, it is very frowned upon for western people in particular to adopt Ugandan children, I'll ask her what folks in the streets and in the orphanages think about it.

 

I am NO expert on Uganda adoption and Tiffani will probably be able to provide accurate info. However, the information you state above isnt correct. Adoption IS difficult in Uganda, because there is a 3 yr residency requirement before you can adopt. However, judges have the leeway to waive this and allow the adoption without it. I would imagine having an agency that is very experienced in this area will be important to reducing the possibility of a failed adoption. I would also imagine that for certain special needs children the restrictions are made looser, as in most countries, because its believed those children have more difficulty being cared for in their home country and are in greatest need of medical care and permanancy.

 

http://adoption.state.gov/country_information/country_specific_info.php?country-select=uganda

 

There were 207 adoptions of Ugandan children to the US in 2011.


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#8 of 12 Old 10-03-2012, 05:05 PM
 
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Yes, they say that on the internet, and I hope that if it's true they did so my ethical means,

 

Are you talking about Tiffani? if so, thats a pretty offensive thing to say. "they say that on the internet"...what, she's lying?? She is a longtime member of this board and we all went through the wait and struggle to adopt her children with her, and rejoiced when they finally came home.


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#9 of 12 Old 10-03-2012, 05:50 PM
 
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But don't you see, Katherine? They're NOT home! They're being held hostage by their oppressive colonial overlords! If Tiffany really cared about them, she would return them to the orphanage posthaste! It will be so much more culturally authentic!

(/sarcasm)
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#10 of 12 Old 10-03-2012, 07:08 PM
 
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But don't you see, Katherine? They're NOT home! They're being held hostage by their oppressive colonial overlords! If Tiffany really cared about them, she would return them to the orphanage posthaste! It will be so much more culturally authentic!
(/sarcasm)

 

duh.gif  of course!

 

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#11 of 12 Old 10-09-2012, 04:59 PM - Thread Starter
 
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LOL!  I don't have time to come around here much anymore, so I missed all of this until now, but yes, I can assure you that I did in fact adopt two children from Uganda, and WE GOT VERY LUCKY (because despite all my research, we were still fairly naive) and their adoptions were totally, 100% ethical, unless you count the very fact that our adoption being "successful" was something that probably led to more adoptions happening, and now there is definitely a market for babies in Uganda, which is horribly unfortunate.  Lots of bad reports of coercion, etc, and I think the only reason I feel so confident about our kids is because of all of the circumstances surrounding their abandonments, their babies home, the lawyer we used, the fact that we adopted in 2009/2010 before the big rush to Uganda happened and it became profitable for many parties.... but I don't recommend Ugandan adoption anymore at all for people who are wanting young, healthy babies or toddlers.  Ugandans are beginning to adopt in increasing numbers (yay!) and there are more efforts happening toward family preservation, etc.... It is just too risky and fueling the fire to hop on that lengthy waiting list for young healthy babes, no matter how long you are willing to wait....

 

BUT, if someone is interested in a child with special needs, or a child over the age of 5, then Uganda can be a wonderful place to adopt from, provided that you do your homework and partner with the right people. I know far more than I ever wanted to know about ethical problems in Ugandan adoption, and I'd never recommend any agency or situation that wasn't "doing it right" -- there are lots of agencies and lawyers operating in Uganda, but I'd only trust a very small few.  And even then, I'd hire a 3rd party investigator to make sure the child's story checks out.  

and you're right, it is illegal to ADOPT from Uganda without living there for 3 years, but because of the large numbers of orphaned children (a number which is nowhere near as large as those '147 million orphans' types would have you believe, but there are definitely still orphans in need of families -- they just aren't usually babies ;-)) the courts typically allow for families to obtain legal guardianship and then finalize adoptions once home.  

 

Mamma Mia, what orphanage does your mother work with?  I can tell you that most Ugandans think it's great that Americans want to adopt Ugandan children, and they will routinely ask you to take their kids. Not saying that anyone should do this, and I was thankful to be with a Ugandan woman who scolded people who hit me up to take their kids, but most Ugandans think it's fine, and we were thanked many times for "taking" the kids.  There is another segment of the population, however, who are a bit more knowledgeable about what happens when kids start being adopted in large numbers, and I'd agree with them that Ugandan adoption is more than a little out of control right now.  Thankfully, there are people who are working with the gov't to ensure that not only are babies homes and lawyers held to high legal standards when doing legal guardianship cases, (the US embassy does it's best as well, with fairly thorough investigations, though I know a lot of kids slip through the cracks that maybe shouldn't be brought to the US, depending on your point of view) but also to increase family preservation measures to try to get many of the "orphans" back with their families.  Uganda has been talking about becoming a Hague country, so that will help, but things are slow moving, of course.... 

as for what the orphanages think about it, I really hate to sound cynical here, but many of the orphanages are finding ways to profit from adoptions, and that is a large part of the problem.  Ugandans should be first in line to adopt, but many babies homes will try to find international families first, because they get $$ and donations that a Ugandan family can't provide.  Other babies homes would rather keep their "orphans" at the orphanage, to attract sympathy from westerners who will donate far more for "orphans" than they will donate to families who are at risk of falling apart.  In the wise words of Mark Riley, who is at the forefront of re-modeling Ugandan adoption, "there is not an orphan crisis in Uganda, there is a family preservation crisis" -- MOST of the "orphans" in orphanages HAVE families, many of them have families who could quite easily take care of them, but since that shiny new western orphanage exists, with 3 meals a day, schooling, and the possibility of life in America, many Ugandan families will put kids in orphanages who shouldn't be there, and they'll lie about their circumstances to try to get their kids adopted.  On the other hand, sometimes a baby or toddler will end up in an orphanage "accidentally" and if the orphanage doesn't do a thorough investigation, the child may be whisked off to america before their parent knows what happened -- here is one example of this happening... http://www.youtube.com/embed/89-6lPA0u84

I don't agree that a child needs to stay in an orphanage in their home country to retain a sense of cultural pride -- our kids are very proud of being from "My Ganda" and we will visit Uganda as much as we can, but our kids had absolutely nobody, and if they had grown up and aged out of their orphanage, who knows what their lives would have been like.  They may have gone on to live beautiful lives, if they were the rare kids who found it within themselves to do that, but statistically speaking, life is hard for orphaned kids, and ours truly were orphaned, with not a single person to call their own.  I do want to hire a 3rd party investigator to see if we can track down any family at all, but the odds are slim.  

anyway, the above posted kiddos are still looking for families, (I think) and their agency is great -- more specifically, the Ugandan coordinator is great, and she has ethics absolutely at the forefront of her mind when trying to find families for kids.

 


We're Tiffani , Mark , Lucy (9/99) , Dexter (8/01) ,and Zachary Marvin (3/07) and Naomi Rose (6/09), home 11/10, by way of Ugandan adoption.

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#12 of 12 Old 10-19-2012, 12:24 PM
 
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Totally agree with everything Tiffani has said. She knows her stuff about UG adoptions. She approaches it from a well-balanced child oriented and ethical improvement stance! It is always an encouragement to me! I think very many adoptive parents that work in Uganda care deeply about that nation of Uganda and that good and ethical choices are being made in the current system. And to say that it is illegal is sort of silly, because, even if you were given guardianship by Uganda of your child if it were "illegal" there would be NO way the embassy would allow you a visa to bring your child home (which does happen far more than many people know). The embassy will not do things it ought not to because a family "wants a child". 

 

All that said... the solution to the "orphan" issue in Uganda is to help support families (like Tiffani stated)... many (not all) children in homes HAVE some form of family... not one that can raise them. More homes need to stop taking in kids and start using their resources, supporters, and funding to sponsor children to stay with their families. It is really quite simple... just not being done.

 

Also, most children adopted from Uganda tend to go back often (honestly more than ANY other adoptees) from my observations... mainly because their parents haven't adopted from Uganda "just to adopt," but because many of us have had prior experience in Uganda... and just LOVE it and are invested in the place and people in more ways that just through adoption. Adoption is very positively viewed by all the locals I met... and I got "off the beaten path"... spent time with a wide variety of people outside of traditional expat and adoption areas.

 

Our son continues to learn his birth language, culture and we eat the food at least monthly. We are wanting to go back (just to visit) next fall once we get a passport.

 

Lastly I think it is a greater "right" to be raised in family than it is in a culture... culture is meaningless with out a family to enrich it.


Marci

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Married to my best friend, homeschooling, gardening,

running a camp for at-risk kiddos and walking a narrow path.

 

Mom to an amazingly fun crew of 5!

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