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#1 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 09:38 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I've been very determined to exclusively BF this little one, but now my friends have me second-guessing myself.  They all pump and point out that it's super convenient if you want to go somewhere without the baby for more than 30 minutes at a time.  I hate the idea of using bottles, but I know I have to decide what the long-term plan is going to be soon after birth because babies will refuse the bottle if you wait too long to introduce it.  So I guess my question is: Is exclusive BF realistic or should I just assume that I will end up pumping sometime down the road (and prepare myself now)?  And if I do end up pumping, how can I make peace with the fact that we're not exclusively BF'ing?


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#2 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 09:49 AM
 
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exclusively breastfeeding is completely realistic if you don't have to return to a job and don't plan on needing lots of time away from the baby in the beginning. Eventually, you may choose to pump some, but I don't think you HAVE to choose that now or even plan on it. With my middle child, I worked from home so I don't think I ever needed to give him expressed breastmilk. I know I pumped, but I believe I ended up donating 100% of that milk. With my 3rd kid I was apprenticing and attending births, so I did pump to be sure we had some in the freezer. She wasn't a big fan of bottles, so she drank from a cup until she was a bit older and then she enjoyed bottles too (although, still favored nursing!). I will be working very shortly after this kiddo comes, so I will need to pump and have milk in the freezer for when I get called to a birth. We will just have to wing it, either the kid will take the bottle or not. If not, then my husband will have to try a cup out. If that doesn't work, he might have to call one of our lactating friends.... we will figure it out when we get to that point.

 

I don't have anything super emotionally attached to the idea that this baby needs to take 100% of feeds directly from my breast, so the idea that a few feeds here or there may need to come from a bottle just doesn't phase me. I find it more convenient to feed the baby directly from my breast when we are together, so that is what we will be doing, but I also will feel no guilt if my baby has a bottle of expressed breastmilk once in a while when I am off at a birth.


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#3 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 10:02 AM
 
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i'm a SAHM/WAHM, so i have the luxury of not needing to leave my babies for any amount of time- i adamantly bring my nursling along with me if i need to go somewhere.  i don't pump, and we don't own any bottles, and it's worked fine in our family.

 

that said, i have had a newborn who could not nurse due to extended hospitalization, and i did get cozy with the pump.  so i have that humble frame of reference, too.  given the choice, though, i much prefer to be pump free.


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#4 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 10:06 AM
 
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I didnt EBF with DD, but she rarely ever had milk from a bottle and I rarely pumped. Are you planning to be away from the babe for longer than an hour during the first 4-5 months? If so, then I would say that it would be nice to have some milk in the freezer. DD never really took a bottle, but she did take a sippy cup at 4 months. Before that I would pump occasionally and fill up ice cube trays of milk for her to suck on when DH was watching her. Basically, I only pumped when she slept too long and I noticed that she had skipped a feeding. I never had more than 20 oz in the freezer, but it was a nice backup.

With this one, I plan to pump more because I have no idea how things will work with DD. I feel like there might be times where she needs my time and attention and DH might need to feed the newbie. If I have extra, I may give it to DD in a sippy cup if we are out of regular milk or freeze it for popsicles for either of them. Ill be totally satisfied if I can just pump an extra 4 oz a day and freeze it.

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#5 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 10:51 AM
 
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IMO, being EBF does NOT mean that the mother doesn't pump.  At all.  My kids have never had an ounce of formula and I consider them EBF even though they would drink the occasional bottle of pumped milk.  In fact, if the term of EBF is their frame of reference that there was never a bottle...I'd likely get very snarky with them.  *I* consider EBF to be exclusively BREASTMILK fed.  Otherwise it's just one of those insipid "mommy war" things that the SAHMs use against the WOHMs.  Ugh. 

 

For both kids I pumped once a day for the first year to donate so I felt nothing wrong with giving my kids a couple of ounces here or there so I could leave them for a few hours.  Sometimes the adult partners just want a meal alone and providing a bottle to *potentially* use isn't a bad thing.

 

I was planning on returning to work following my daughter's arrival so we started testing out bottles around 6 weeks and she never had any nipple confusion.  With my son I was at home and he didn't get his first bottle of breastmilk for months (maybe 5ish?).  Again, no nipple confusion.  This isn't a decision that has to be made today.

 

 

 

 

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#6 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 11:12 AM
 
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When my son was little, I was a SAHM and we had no local family and no money for babysitters, so I rarely "needed" to pump since I was basically always with him.  I did pump occasionally and on occasion, it was nice to have some milk on hand.  I think he had a first bottle of expressed milk around 3 months old when I wanted to have some wine at a holiday dinner without worrying about how it would effect him.  His next was probably a couple months later when he stayed with a friend of mine (his first babysitter ever) for 3 hours while I went out to dinner for my birthday.  There were a couple of other times where I was just so exhausted and wanted to not be touched for a while and had my husband feed him a bottle of previously expressed milk instead.  It was nice to have the option, worth the $20 or whatever for a little hand pump, but I just didn't use it much.

 

Not like titles are actually important, but for what it's worth, I've always considered "EBF" to mean "exclusively fed breastmilk" and not indicative of whether the milk comes from a boob or a bottle.

.


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#7 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 11:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AfricanQueen99 View Post

IMO, being EBF does NOT mean that the mother doesn't pump.  At all.  My kids have never had an ounce of formula and I consider them EBF even though they would drink the occasional bottle of pumped milk.  In fact, if the term of EBF is their frame of reference that there was never a bottle...I'd likely get very snarky with them.  *I* consider EBF to be exclusively BREASTMILK fed.  Otherwise it's just one of those insipid "mommy war" things that the SAHMs use against the WOHMs.  Ugh. 

 


^yeahthat^

 

None of my kids have ever had formula, but they have had pumped milk out of bottles and I certainly considered them EBF.  

 

My first would never take a bottle.  Personality or we waited too long, I have no idea, but I could *never* leave her.  And yanno, that was ok for a while, but it got old after 5-6 months.  My other kids were given bottles early on by daddy, and I was able to get away on occasion, and he felt much better knowing that if I had to be gone, he had a way to feed the child.

 

And my third had a posterior tongue tie and we had a lot of latch issues until it was fixed, he drank pumped milk for a bottle for most of his first two months.

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#8 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 11:33 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by coldandsleepy View Post

Not like titles are actually important, but for what it's worth, I've always considered "EBF" to mean "exclusively fed breastmilk" and not indicative of whether the milk comes from a boob or a bottle.

.

 

I agree.

 

My first two kids got their first bottle of pumped breastmilk within the first week of their lives.  However, by the end of the first month, we all figured out that it was just a lot easier for me to feed them "from the tap" rather than having to pump, store, clean everything, etc.  When we tried to give bottles again later on, neither of them would take it (and I threw out a lot of frozen breastmilk!)  So I think it's VERY important to be consistent if you do decide to teach them how to use a bottle, so that they don't 'forget' how to do it.

 

With DS, I never bothered to try with the pumped milk, since I knew that it would be a very rare occasion that anyone other than me would be feeding him.

 

With this baby, I'm going to pump some, and see if the bottle thing works.  If not, I'll be pumping for when baby transitions to a cup, since I now know that at least 2 years of breastfeeding is optimal (something I didn't know with the previous babies.)

 

I will say that when I DID pump, in addition to breastfeeding, I had a little bit of trouble regulating my supply early on.  My body thought I needed to make more milk than I actually DID need to make, and I got engorged more often.  Just something to think about.


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#9 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 11:45 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AfricanQueen99 View Post

IMO, being EBF does NOT mean that the mother doesn't pump.  At all.  My kids have never had an ounce of formula and I consider them EBF even though they would drink the occasional bottle of pumped milk.  In fact, if the term of EBF is their frame of reference that there was never a bottle...I'd likely get very snarky with them.  *I* consider EBF to be exclusively BREASTMILK fed.  Otherwise it's just one of those insipid "mommy war" things that the SAHMs use against the WOHMs.  Ugh. 

 

For both kids I pumped once a day for the first year to donate so I felt nothing wrong with giving my kids a couple of ounces here or there so I could leave them for a few hours.  Sometimes the adult partners just want a meal alone and providing a bottle to *potentially* use isn't a bad thing.

 

I was planning on returning to work following my daughter's arrival so we started testing out bottles around 6 weeks and she never had any nipple confusion.  With my son I was at home and he didn't get his first bottle of breastmilk for months (maybe 5ish?).  Again, no nipple confusion.  This isn't a decision that has to be made today.

 

 

 

 




So, basically you are saying that any mom who thinks that there is some merit in "no bottles, no artificial nipples" is just a SAHM perpetuating a mommy war? How obnoxious. There are plenty of people who have differing opinions of what EBF means, and some people do think it means breast only. Just because a mom does EBF in that way does not mean that they are trying to start a mommy war. There are plenty of moms who have had the experience that artificial nipples= bad latch or nipple confusion. IMO, sometimes moms who are absolutely against giving formula wind up giving it when they are pressured by doctors and family because the kiddo is already taking a bottle and if a latch is bad or something isnt going well with the nursing then you can just pump and feed. When you dont have enough frozen milk or cant pump enough milk its often really easy to be pressured into giving formula. While I think there are a lot of issues between SAHMs and WAHMs, this is the first Ive ever heard of a mom thinking that EBF= no artificial nipples being a SAHM "using something against WAHMs." I feel like its gotten to the point where every time a mom has an opinion that cant be applied to someone who works, they are being accused of perpetuating some war. Its totally fine to bottle feed. Its totally fine to use pacifiers. Its also totally fine to think that those things are not great for your kid and choose to exclusively use only the nipple attached to your breast to feed and pacify your child. None of those opinions are SAHM vs. WAHM unless the mother chooses to make that the issue.

As I said before, I didnt EBF and I used pacifiers too, but I know moms who didnt and who think that EBF= breast only and I see nothing wrong with that being their opinion.

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#10 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 12:04 PM
 
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My point started with "IMO" and I would never dream of telling my working friends that pump their butts off to provide for their children that they aren't exclusively breast fed.  If mom feels the child is EBF that's good enough of a definition.  My snark would be applied because it sounds like OP's friends would judge and I would have no issue explaining to them why *I* think they're wrong.

 

 I don't have an issue with formula or pacifiers.  Basically, if parents feed, house and love their kids I'm good.  Don't beat your kids and I don't judge...that's pretty much my style.


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#11 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 12:48 PM
 
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I'm glad this conversation has come up because it's been something I've been thinking about a lot this past week.  I was talking about it with my mom last night, as a matter of fact!  I will be a stay at home (trying to work some too!) mom, and I had intended to get some kind of a pump so that DH and I could go out on a date here and there.  DH has also expressed his interest, more than once, in being able to feed the baby sometimes too and having that bonding time.  I read, I believe in Ina May's Guide to Natural Childbirth, that about 3 weeks is the best time to introduce the bottle to avoid nipple confusion.  When I was at the store, I saw how expensive the electronic pumps are, and then there's this little manual pump for $30!  I thought surely I won't need more than that.  My mom made a couple of good points about the pump.  She said to just get a really good one, or rent it from the hospital, to help with engourgement.  Also, she was home for the first 3 months with both of my little brothers, but she preferred to pump and use a bottle for feeding out in public. I also feel like as long as the baby is only eating your breast milk, than you are in fact EBF.  Exactly like with cloth diapering, we do our best, KWIM?


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#12 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 01:12 PM
 
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Getting back to the point...

My personal opinion, as I do not know your future work situation, is to keep ALL options open.  You don't know what is going to work best for you and the baby until the baby gets here and everyone involved gets into a routine.  Making a decision like "I will never pump" right now is putting yourself into a corner that could lead to unnecessary stress and tears when you're sleep-deprived and your kid's been crying for 2 hours straight and you don't know what else to do.

 

These have been mentioned, but it's good to repeat...  there are other reasons for pumping:  If you have a funky supply that needs smoothing out, if you've got a boob that's producing substantially less than the other, if you have a lot of foremilk and not enough hindmilk, if you like to plan for the unknown (like should you end up away from your kid for a longer period than you planned...or end up in the hospital, god forbid, especially under anesthetic).  Some women like to pump so their husbands can feel more included in the taking care of the baby (might not be your thing, who knows, but it might be welcome if you haven't slept in a while and are at your wit's end).

 

I would suggest researching places around you that rent pumps.  That way, you're not completely committed to paying the full price of a pump (and the heart attack that goes with it).  Maybe after a couple months, see how you feel.  See what you think you need.  Then purchase, if you feel inclined...or don't.  Or you can get a pretty cheap hand pump, and have it around "just in case".

 

For what it's worth, I breastfed, but also introduced a bottle around 2 months, due to needing a babysitter, after nearly going nuts from not having a date night with my DH and my DD cluster-feeding.  I could have some time (it was brief, don't get me wrong, but very nice) to be an adult and not just a milk factory.  It saved my sanity and my kiddo never had nipple confusion, one way or the other.

 

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#13 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 02:00 PM
 
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I also think it's best to keep an open mind regarding pumping.  I worked outside the home full time from the time my son was 9 wks - 11 months old so I had to pump for when I was away from him.  We introduced a bottle at 1 month old as advised by my LC's. That first month as a new mom and trying to figure everything out was truely exhausting!  The pump did help incredibly with oversupply issues, engorgement, and foremilk/hindmilk imbalances as well.  We also travel quite a bit and it's nice to be able to feed baby a bottle of pumped milk in the carseat instead of having to stop every 45 minutes (in which case we never would have made it anywhere).  I could not physically reach leaning over trying to breastfeed with him in the carseat.  My husband and I have always considered parenting an equal partnership and for us that included feedings after 1 month.  When I took a break from work at 11 months, my son never had another bottle again (and wouldn't take one after a couple months) so fortunately we never had to worry about weaning him from the bottle.  I always had a huge supply of milk in the freezer (since I produced enough for 3 kids!) and it was reassuring to have that available in case of an emergency.  While I would LOVE to never have to sit down to pump, wash bottles and pumping supplies, etc I would still choose to pump some even if I was a SAHM.  I completely consider my son EBF even though he had pumped milk.  I'm actually quite proud of the fact that he's never had formula (although no judgement for those that use formula). 

 

I used Ameda Purely Yours electric pumps (I have 2) and while they are expensive brand new, it's perfectly safe to buy one used and buy new tubing, etc.  There is a little piece that makes it impossible for milk to contaminate the motor or tubes.  The Medela ones are not this way as far as I know.  I got my second one for work/car off craigslist for super cheap from a mom that used it for 2 kids, I've used it for 1, and it's still going strong!  Just FYI.
 

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#14 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 05:55 PM
 
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Despite being a SAHM, all my kids have gotten some pumped milk. Ds1 had barely any because I had a really awful pump from the 80's. With ds2, I bought an Avent hand pump because my mother dragged me (& him) on a 8+ hour drive each way to inter my grandmother's ashes when he was a few weeks old. And despite my mother's lip service to stopping for him, we stopped once, when we picked up my sister & she got mad about how long it took to nurse ds2. If I hadn't had the pump, the poor kid would have been screwed. Whenever I travel with her, I make sure to have some pumped milk because she just will not stop for me to nurse.

 

Anyway, the other reason I pump is because I can not make myself nurse on public transit & since we don't have a car, that sometimes means I have a hungry baby on a bus/train. I try to limit how much I take transit, especially the first few months, but sometimes it just can't be helped. I also like to have some in the freezer in case there's a situation where I can't nurse. This time, I bought a milk saver so I'm hoping that I won't need to actually pump very much, since I leaked a huge amount with ds3.


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#15 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 06:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks everyone, your comments have helped me tremendously and have given me a healthy perspective!! joy.gif 


Happy housewife and mom to big Z, born at home 1/2012. m/c 07/14 @ 5w and happy to get back to trying!  
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#16 of 26 Old 11-15-2011, 06:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Conchobhar View Post

Getting back to the point...

My personal opinion, as I do not know your future work situation, is to keep ALL options open.  You don't know what is going to work best for you and the baby until the baby gets here and everyone involved gets into a routine.  Making a decision like "I will never pump" right now is putting yourself into a corner that could lead to unnecessary stress and tears when you're sleep-deprived and your kid's been crying for 2 hours straight and you don't know what else to do.

 

These have been mentioned, but it's good to repeat...  there are other reasons for pumping:  If you have a funky supply that needs smoothing out, if you've got a boob that's producing substantially less than the other, if you have a lot of foremilk and not enough hindmilk, if you like to plan for the unknown (like should you end up away from your kid for a longer period than you planned...or end up in the hospital, god forbid, especially under anesthetic).  Some women like to pump so their husbands can feel more included in the taking care of the baby (might not be your thing, who knows, but it might be welcome if you haven't slept in a while and are at your wit's end).

 

I would suggest researching places around you that rent pumps.  That way, you're not completely committed to paying the full price of a pump (and the heart attack that goes with it).  Maybe after a couple months, see how you feel.  See what you think you need.  Then purchase, if you feel inclined...or don't.  Or you can get a pretty cheap hand pump, and have it around "just in case".

 

For what it's worth, I breastfed, but also introduced a bottle around 2 months, due to needing a babysitter, after nearly going nuts from not having a date night with my DH and my DD cluster-feeding.  I could have some time (it was brief, don't get me wrong, but very nice) to be an adult and not just a milk factory.  It saved my sanity and my kiddo never had nipple confusion, one way or the other.

 

 

THIS!!

 

DDCC here, but I am a CLC so I do have a lot of BF counseling/experience outside of being a mom who has "EBF". To me, EBF means exclusively breast milk. If I have clients who exclusively pump, to me, they are still EBFing moms. I BF my 2nd child after a horrible first attempt at BFing with my first and never pumped. I was a SAHM and never needed to. I didn't have family around to watch him and never left him, so there was basically no need for me. I feel like I was lucky for not having to pump, but with this baby, I work PT so I will have to. IMHO, people can give you advice until the cows come home, but you will see what works best for you and your baby. Pretty much every LC you meet will tell you to avoid this and that, but I BF and used a paci for my high needs baby and he did just fine. It worked for us. 

 

 

Also, I work for the WIC program, and we give away free breast pumps and also have them available to loan free of charge. Something to keep in mind if it's available to you. 

 

ETA: My best advice would be to get off to a good start breastfeeding nursing your baby at the breast. Again, it's not always possible depending on our lives. After that, do whatever works for you. The baby is going to be better at removing milk than any pump will, and he/she will be learning how to be a pro at BFing without you having to worry about pump pieces/parts, etc. Some people love pumping, some people hate it. Do whatever works best for you and your baby! 

 


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#17 of 26 Old 11-16-2011, 09:57 AM
 
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I hated pumping, and since I was going back to work I got a lot of pressure from people to start early 'just in case' mostly because they wanted to get to feed Rocket themselves.  It was frustrating.  Truly the pumping itself wasn't really that bad, just inconvenient and adds to the piles of dishes.  It did come in handy to have a little leeway if I wanted to take an extended car trip (as someone mentioned) or if I wasn't feeling well.  We had no issues with confusion.  He certainly preferred nursing to bottles, but he ate.  My husband really enjoyed being able to give Rocket a bottle if he wanted to let me sleep in or catch a nap or take an uninterrupted bath.  I don't see it as a gateway to formula just because a child will accept a bottle.  That seems like a stretch.

 

I have a friend who pumped exclusively.  I found it pretty weird to be asked to give her son a bottle while she went into my bedroom to pump.  She couldn't imagine being tied down to nursing, but also wanted to make sure her child had the best possible food.  **shrug** To each her own I guess.

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#18 of 26 Old 11-16-2011, 10:08 AM
 
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I know many, many people who exclusively nurse their infants and do not use bottles. In all cases they are SAHM. It is common and realistic and doable if you choose. There is no race to the finish line with bottles. Many people who use them do successfully introduce them later and if they are not successfully introduced the mom can find periods of time away if she needs it.

 

If you don't anticipate them being a big part of your life I wouldn't worry about it. In my experience, the pressure usually comes from family members. (Not my family, they think it is bizarre that a nursing mom would want to deal with a pump if they can avoid it.) Train them to do something truely useful instead, like wash diapers and sweep the floor.

 

I work full time and have pumped many many times to exclusively ebf. Bottles are only ever given when I am not around and unavailable. I find the "convenience" argument hilarious. Clearly these people have never used a breast pump. I don't consider myself less of a nursing mother because of it.

 

 

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#19 of 26 Old 11-17-2011, 09:13 AM
 
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I BF two babies before this one and *attempted* pumping with both kids but it just never worked out for me. I'm still not really sure why. I bought a manual pump and an expensive one but I could never pump a good amount of milk. It was such a hassle to try to pump for 20 mins and get nothing.. I ended up giving up on it after a month or so both times. The downside of not pumping is that you are literally glued to your baby. 

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#20 of 26 Old 11-18-2011, 05:56 AM
 
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Originally Posted by imakecutebabies View Post

I BF two babies before this one and *attempted* pumping with both kids but it just never worked out for me. I'm still not really sure why. I bought a manual pump and an expensive one but I could never pump a good amount of milk. It was such a hassle to try to pump for 20 mins and get nothing.. I ended up giving up on it after a month or so both times. The downside of not pumping is that you are literally glued to your baby. 



When I lost my job I stopped pumping regularly, and then sort of tapered off to not pumping.  Later we decided to go out for our anniversary.  Rocket was with my parents,  they had the last of my freezer stash (he was eating lots of solids by then anyway) I figured I'd pump while he was gone.  It Just. Didn't. Work.  I was so engorged, I looked like a porn star and I thought my poor breasts were going to tear right off!  I called my parents as soon as we woke up in the morning begging them to hurry back.  Frozen peas did nothing.  I literally nursed him in their car in the parking lot of our apartment as soon as they pulled in!

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#21 of 26 Old 11-18-2011, 02:55 PM
 
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So I don't really know how this engorgement thing works... I will be a SAHM and wasn't planning to buy anything more than a little manual pump for that rare trip to the hair salon or a date with DH.  My mom has me thinking that a good electric pump (like from the hospital) is a MUST for early breastfeeding when the engorgement kicks in.  Is this true?  Also, her supply more or less dried up by a year, I think because she was pumping and not feeding on demand.  Is that more or less how the supply works? I need to go buy a book...


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#22 of 26 Old 11-18-2011, 04:26 PM
 
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Originally Posted by element2012 View Post

So I don't really know how this engorgement thing works... I will be a SAHM and wasn't planning to buy anything more than a little manual pump for that rare trip to the hair salon or a date with DH.  My mom has me thinking that a good electric pump (like from the hospital) is a MUST for early breastfeeding when the engorgement kicks in.  Is this true?  Also, her supply more or less dried up by a year, I think because she was pumping and not feeding on demand.  Is that more or less how the supply works? I need to go buy a book...

This was my experience (but remember everyone is different) - My milk came in at 3 days and it was intense!!  I am small chested and stayed that way, but my breasts were so full/engorged that it made it more difficult for my son to latch compared to when I just had colostrum.  A baby's stomach is only the size of a grape when they are newborn so there is no way for them to completely empty the breast at first.  I was intimidated by my pump at first so we just suffered through.  I think it lead to more pain than was necessary.  I wish now I had used the pump immediately to pump off a little of the milk.  It can also help the nipple protrude a bit and help with latch.  We would have both been happier.  I started pumping around 3 or 4 weeks I think.  We survived just fine and had a VERY successful BFing relationship, however, for this next baby, I just know how to make it a little easier.  I know plenty of mommas that never pump or just hand express as needed.  I manual pump would also work just fine to give you a little relief from engorgement.  Cabbage leaves, a hot shower, hot compresses also help with engorgement.  I used an electric pump b/c that's what I had for when I went back to work.  Everyone's situation is different and you just don't know what will work for you until it actually happens.

 

 

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#23 of 26 Old 11-18-2011, 04:56 PM
 
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When you are pumping to soften an engorged breast you only want to pump a TINY bit - until the breast softens enough for the baby to latch on.  If you pump more than that, your body will assume the baby is drinking that milk and it will make more milk!

 

I don't think a hospital grade pump is necessary unless you are exclusively pumping for some reason, and in that case, they do work far better than other pumps.

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#24 of 26 Old 11-18-2011, 05:42 PM
 
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Yeah, the only reason for a hospital grade pump is if you're working & need a lot of milk stored, imo. You don't need a pump AT ALL for engorgement. If it's so bad that baby can't latch on, you can hand express enough to make it so baby can latch. In fact there's some evidence hand expression is a lot better than using a pump, especially early on. (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110718201518.htm)

 

And a good video on how to express by hand http://newborns.stanford.edu/Breastfeeding/HandExpression.html

 

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#25 of 26 Old 11-18-2011, 06:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
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That was an awesome video, thank you!!!


Happy housewife and mom to big Z, born at home 1/2012. m/c 07/14 @ 5w and happy to get back to trying!  
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#26 of 26 Old 11-21-2011, 10:59 AM
 
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I exclusively breastfeed my DD (meaning she only got breastmilk), but I did on occasion, pump so I could have milk stored in case I had to go to the store without her or something.  I would never want to exclusively pump unless I had to... that just seems like too much work.


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