Anyone refused a c-section successfully? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 27 Old 01-27-2013, 08:03 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I've been thinking about something my doctor told me a few years ago and wonder if it's ever really happened.

 

We were talking about cesareans and the fact that the hospital he uses won't allow a VBAC, but he said that once you are in heavy labor they can't send you off and that you would have to agree to the surgery. So theoretically, you could go into labor, wait until you are fairly far along, and then just refuse the surgery. He also said they would bug the crap out of you to get you to agree, but that there was nothing they could do to actually make you do it (assuming you were still conscious). This was in Washington state, BTW.

 

I delivered vaginally with this doctor, and the "rules" were hep-lock and constant in bed monitoring. I told the nurse to hep-lock herself and threw the monitor about five minutes after it was placed as it was way too tight. No one batted an eye. The nurse also told me that I would have to give injections as "by law" they had to use them once they prepared them. I told her that it was her choice how to use them, but I never asked for any for my baby so she needed to deal with that on her own. She apologized and left, two kids ago I would have felt bad and let her stick the baby :-(

 

Anyway it's all just made me think about all the interventions I've agreed to in the past that I thought I "had" to do. Wondering if anyone was brave enough to try my doc.'s idea, and if it worked out. 

 

I am absolutely not trying to shame, or belittle anyone who felt that they were tricked into a c-section or anything else. It took me four births to figure out that they aren't going to hold you down and put those stupid baby monitors back on if you are just going to rip them off and throw them again :-)

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#2 of 27 Old 01-27-2013, 02:45 PM
 
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Being empowered to request, deny, question procedures, medication, tests and judgement is within our rights! Thank you for taking care of yourself. I found a lot of great information about stuff with the hospital and c sections on csectionrecoverykit.com. I got a binder and it really helped, plus breastfeeding is so important, so you want to be able to do the best for you and baby! Right on.....
 

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#3 of 27 Old 01-27-2013, 02:53 PM
 
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If the doctor did not offered you c-section and  the child is brain damaged and dead....then what? You would sue the hospital and the doctor an rightfully so. The doctor knows that c-section, while having risks of its own, lowers maternal and neonatal mortality. They offer and suggest it to you because statistics are on their side.  Of course you can refuse but there is one more thing to think about. Epidural carries fewer risks than general anestestia. So, waiting until you are  unconscious is not necessary is the best path for you and your baby. Further more, why would you fall unconscious? A fetal demise can happen  with mother being OK for time being.

 

Why not talk to the doctor and see what are the reasons for proposed surgery?

 

I am not sure being rude to a nurse who was doings her job is the best actions. Imagine you came to a coffee shop your talk a baristato go and "latter yourself".  How we treated is very much influences by our attitude as well. Of course, we all came across rude and uncaring healthcare workers, but majority of nurse and doctors are there because they love to care for people.  I came across people in the hospitals and clinics were were rude and found that dealing thought official channels, rather than coming down to their level of rudeness was a better way to deal with them as it changes the institutional culture.

 

If you suffer a complications, the  minutes that it take to start an IV could mean difference between life and death  of your baby or yourself.

 

Compare to the birth itself, heplock is minor nuisance.  IF the nurse was not following your directions regarding heplock, I suggest you write a letter about your experience to Patients Relations and see how hospital can assist patients  with birth plans. For examples, if you do not want IV in the certain hand, they can put a alert braces on that hand on admission. They already have bracelet like that for mastectomy patients.

 

I am curious to know why did you decide to go to the hospital rather than UC or HB since you are are not interested in treatment provides in the hospital?

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#4 of 27 Old 01-27-2013, 05:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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And if you refuse c-section and the child is brain damaged and dead....then what?

 

Why not talk to the doctor and see what are the reasons for proposed surgery.

 

How classy it is  to  be rude to the nurse who had done nothing bad to you. If you God forbid suffered severe complication, the  minutes that it take to start an IV could mean difference between life and death  of your baby or yourself.

 

Compare to the birth itself, heplock is minor nuisance.

 

Why even bother going to the hospital if  you are doing to refuse everything anyway? If you are going  to be rude to healthcare providers why deal with them at all? Why not do homebirth or UC?

Hmmm, seems I touched a bit of a nerve.

 

I am not a super classy gal when people are trying to stick me with needles repeatedly as I am already pushing a baby out. It's just not something I can multi-task :-)

 

Anywhoo, this was specifically as it relates to blanket-policies in hospitals such as no VBAC for any reason ever regardless of personal medical situations. I am assuming that one would know the risks beforehand, and might still want to try for one at a hospital that had such a policy.

 

Just wondering if it had really happened in real life. Sheesh

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#5 of 27 Old 01-27-2013, 08:38 PM
 
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All following said in all due respect.  This was written in a pondering tone, not a threatening one.  Meant for thoughtful discussion, not attacks. 

 

 

Rarely is a medical professional, doctor, nurse or otherwise trying to "trick" anyone into anything.  But that is honestly up to the perception/needs of the patient, the good/bad/poor bedside manner of the healthcare provider, and it can only be agreed that every situation is different.  I don't believe that every patient is dumb, nor do I believe that every physician has horns.  

 

That being said, informed consent is what you are looking for.  This is necessary for all surgical procedures, excepting in cases of true emergency (such as trauma).  Procedures such as placing an IV for antibiotics (say you are GBS positive) or vaccinating your child, do not fall under informed consent, but you will likely be asked to sign a waiver.  

 

Smaller hospitals are probably more likely to refuse VBACs, because they do not have the personnel or experience to deal with obstetric and pediatric emergencies, should they arise.  For example, if they only have home-call anesthesia and no NICU...you can bet your bottom dollar they will beeline you to a controlled c-section.  

 

Definitely, definitely ask about the hospital's policies before you decide to give birth there.  Or even if you are going to homebirth, still check in the case of transfer.  (Especially in this case, because you can be guaranteed that things will feel beyond your control.)  Ask for copies of the waiver, if need be, and file them with your birth plan, because then you will be confident that they exist.  And one thing I think this forum is great for...find an advocate.  A doula, your husband, sister, mom, etc.  Someone who knows what you want and will be a willing and vocal voice.  

 

The big caveat to this, is that I don't advocate refusing everything your healthcare provider suggests.  I'm pro-vaccine, pro-IV, etc. etc. but I also believe in an open and honest dialogue with the people I take care of (I'm not an OB).  If you don't trust your doctor, nurse, etc. then walking into the hospital is guaranteed to be a scary and awful experience.      

 

 

And finally, it's not an easy question.  

Scenario 1:  VBAC, labor is prolonged, baby showing signs of distress, mom refuses c-section:  baby is born and is perfectly fine.  

Scenario 2:  VBAC, labor is prolonged, baby showing signs of distress, mom refuses c-section:  baby has hypoxic injury and cerebral palsy.  

 

How do we tell the difference between these situations (with, obviously, a million possible shades of grey)?  We can't.  That is the question.  

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#6 of 27 Old 01-27-2013, 09:31 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you Epsion for your thoughtful reply.

 

I agree with you completely, and would have the same thoughts if labor was long and/or distress was apparent.

 

My doctor's idea was for a completely healthy, low risk, everything going fantastic refusal of c-section even if you had one previously. I honestly don't think I could do it myself as labor stalls for me if I am stressed and I would imagine the arguing over policy would stall me out entirely.

 

In my example, I had was fine with a hep-lock with the understanding that it would be placed in my right arm, as the last two times I had one in my left hand I ended up with nerve damage and an unusable arm for a week or so afterward. No idea why, but I really couldn't afford for that to happen again as my husband was leaving a few days later and I would have the newborn and three other kids to care for.

 

It was in my birth plan, and the doctor knew but things were happening so quickly that the nurse kept trying for the wrong hand--that's when I refused and I was surprised they just let it drop. I was exhausted and couldn't make the words to explain it, and doctor was tired and must have forgotten why I didn't want it in the "normal" place. This was just meant as an example of something I was told was "non-negotiable", and yet when it came down to it I was allowed to refuse it (not that I think that was a good choice, but at that point I had been awake for days and was out of it).

 

**I am guessing this was the wrong forum for thins, and I apologize. I didn't even see the VBAC section when I posted this, maybe it could be moved so as not to offend anyone further?

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#7 of 27 Old 01-27-2013, 10:33 PM
 
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I"m not offended by your question at all(though I agree it may be better placed in the VBAC forum).  I think you were asking for honest stories of situations where a woman was denied a VBAC without good reasoning and I would be interested to hear those stories.  I've heard this suggested many times from various people since our hospital does not allow VBACs.  I would mostly have to agree with what you just mentioned about the potential for stress.  I just can't imagine having the presence to try to argue with people while in that situation and not being super stressed by it.  On top of that my last birth was a HBAC transfer for CS so I technically did "show up pushing" as people like to suggest.  Trying to get in a car while in the pushing stage was awful, the car-ride was awful-it's not a situation I would CHOOSE to repeat.  Though I've pushed for 3 hours with both of my labors, perhaps if I thought the baby would be out in 10 minutes I might feel differently.

 

In reference to some of the attitudes regarding health care providers above I would say that I don't believe that they are evil. I do believe it is largely a CYA medical culture right now and people are doing as they were trained.  I don't agree with all of it though and it is my right to have informed consent which is rarely something I have seen modeled in a hospital setting.  In an ideal situation respect would go BOTH ways.

For instance, I am declining the glucose drink during this pregnancy.   I was very happy to have an open discussion with my doctor about it so we could arrive at a solution we were both comfortable with, without stepping on the other person.


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#8 of 27 Old 01-28-2013, 12:18 AM
 
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All following said in all due respect.  This was written in a pondering tone, not a threatening one.  Meant for thoughtful discussion, not attacks. 


Rarely is a medical professional, doctor, nurse or otherwise trying to "trick" anyone into anything.  But that is honestly up to the perception/needs of the patient, the good/bad/poor bedside manner of the healthcare provider, and it can only be agreed that every situation is different.  I don't believe that every patient is dumb, nor do I believe that every physician has horns.  

That being said, informed consent is what you are looking for.  This is necessary for all surgical procedures, excepting in cases of true emergency (such as trauma).  Procedures such as placing an IV for antibiotics (say you are GBS positive) or vaccinating your child, do not fall under informed consent, but you will likely be asked to sign a waiver

What do you mean by this? Informed consent certainly *is* required before an IV can be inserted or a vaccination given.

And, OP, that nurse was talking bollocks. There is no law anywhere that I am aware of which says you must give a drug once it's been drawn up. It's a bit of a pain if it's a narcotic which needs to be accounted for but it can still be done.

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#9 of 27 Old 01-28-2013, 01:11 PM
 
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I am curious to know why did you decide to go to the hospital rather than UC or HB since you are are not interested in treatment provides in the hospital?

Someone has to UC /HB or accept whatever treatment the hospital offers? headscratch.gif

 

Maybe she wanted to be in the hospital "just in case" or could not afford a homebirth…it should not be "accept a standard American birth" or go HB/UC.

 

OP…I have never had a C-sec…but I have managed to avoid interventions I did not want.

 

The way I did this was:

 

-Have a doula.  I think this helped me avoid an unnecessary cascade of interventions.

-avoid lying in bed and looking like a patient

-taking off "for a walk" when they wanted to put me on a oxy drip (the walk did indeed get labour going, and there was no need for oxy when I returned)


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#10 of 27 Old 01-28-2013, 03:16 PM
 
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Thank you Epsion for your thoughtful reply.

 

I agree with you completely, and would have the same thoughts if labor was long and/or distress was apparent.

 

I think its the "labor is long" that gets most people.  Honestly, it gets me, because it's not my field and I don't know the literature.  I wanted to come back and correct/add this, because the big "if" that I left out was the 3rd scenario...baby doing well, but nothing is happening.  (i.e. "stuck" at 4 cm dilation)  How long is okay to stay like that?  Can we always assume that cephalopelvic disproportion, poor fetal presentation, etc. is the culprit therefore, automatic c-section?  I have no idea!  Are these reasons communicated well to the patient?  I'm sure not always.  

 

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I do believe it is largely a CYA medical culture right now and people are doing as they were trained. 

 

Sad, but true.  :/

 

 

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What do you mean by this? Informed consent certainly *is* required before an IV can be inserted or a vaccination given.

And, OP, that nurse was talking bollocks. There is no law anywhere that I am aware of which says you must give a drug once it's been drawn up. It's a bit of a pain if it's a narcotic which needs to be accounted for but it can still be done.

 

I'm sorry, I should have clarified.  "Informed consent" as in I'm legally responsible and required to go over the full procedure, the risks and benefits of the procedure plus any alternatives, and the patient has to express understanding by signing a form to prove that we've had the discussion.  And you're right, informed consent should include the discussion and not just the form.  

 

For better or for worse, I've never had a nurse or doc talk about the "risks and benefits" of an IV before jabbing it in my hand.  Because vaccination is considered a "routine" in this country, a discussion about the risks and benefits should occur, but it does not always.  (Not to hijack, but this is a good resource.)

 

 

I agree, I've never heard of anyone trying to pass off the "we have to use this drug" once it's been drawn up.  Sounds like someone is trying to cut corners. 

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#11 of 27 Old 01-28-2013, 07:04 PM
 
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What do you mean by this? Informed consent certainly *is* required before an IV can be inserted or a vaccination given.


And, OP, that nurse was talking bollocks. There is no law anywhere that I am aware of which says you must give a drug once it's been drawn up. It's a bit of a pain if it's a narcotic which needs to be accounted for but it can still be done.

I'm sorry, I should have clarified.  "Informed consent" as in I'm legally responsible and required to go over the full procedure, the risks and benefits of the procedure plus any alternatives, and the patient has to express understanding by signing a form to prove that we've had the discussion.  And you're right, informed consent should include the discussion and not just the form.  

For better or for worse, I've never had a nurse or doc talk about the "risks and benefits" of an IV before jabbing it in my hand.  Because vaccination is considered a "routine" in this country, a discussion about the risks and benefits should occur, but it does not always.  (Not to hijack, but this is a good resource.)

Then what you are referring to is written consent. Informed consent does not require a consent form. The consent form is used for major procedures as evidence that consent was given. However, from a legal standpoint, certainly in Australia, it is not ironclad protection for the person/people who should obtain informed consent before proceeding.

Consent is equally valid when given or refused verbally.


ETA - no idea why my latest response is inside the quote box. I've bolded it for clarity.

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#12 of 27 Old 01-28-2013, 07:08 PM
 
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Then what you are referring to is written consent. Informed consent does not require a consent form. The consent form is used for major procedures as evidence that consent was given. However, from a legal standpoint, certainly in Australia, it is not ironclad protection for the person/people who should obtain informed consent before proceeding.

Consent is equally valid when given or refused verbally.

ETA - no idea why my latest response is inside the quote box. I've bolded it for clarity.

 

I agree.

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#13 of 27 Old 01-28-2013, 10:21 PM
 
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If the doctor did not offered you c-section and  the child is brain damaged and dead....then what? You would sue the hospital and the doctor an rightfully so. The doctor knows that c-section, while having risks of its own, lowers maternal and neonatal mortality.

 

My goodness! Since when? Surgery only increases maternal mortality. And in some instances it does provide a percentage decrease in neonatal mortality, but babies are harmed during surgery too. For example, in this month's issue of Comtemporary OB-GYN, there is an OB who is being sued for choosing to perform a Cesarean when vaginal birth was imminent because the delay in delivering the baby (it would have been faster to just catch the baby) resulted in permanent brain damage.

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#14 of 27 Old 01-28-2013, 10:25 PM
 
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What do you mean by this? Informed consent certainly *is* required before an IV can be inserted or a vaccination given.

And, OP, that nurse was talking bollocks. There is no law anywhere that I am aware of which says you must give a drug once it's been drawn up. It's a bit of a pain if it's a narcotic which needs to be accounted for but it can still be done.

 

In US hospitals, informed consent is not required before an IV is given. They can just walk in and go, "We're going to do your IV now." They do not have to address risks and benefits, alternatives, etc.


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#15 of 27 Old 01-28-2013, 11:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Someone has to UC /HB or accept whatever treatment the hospital offers? headscratch.gif

 

Maybe she wanted to be in the hospital "just in case" or could not afford a homebirth…it should not be "accept a standard American birth" or go HB/UC.

 

OP…I have never had a C-sec…but I have managed to avoid interventions I did not want.

 

The way I did this was:

 

-Have a doula.  I think this helped me avoid an unnecessary cascade of interventions.

-avoid lying in bed and looking like a patient

-taking off "for a walk" when they wanted to put me on a oxy drip (the walk did indeed get labour going, and there was no need for oxy when I returned)

A doula is something I would absolutely do if heaven forbid I get pregnant again wink1.gif

 

My first birth was a classic case of interventions spirally out of control, and very very nearly ending in c-section--hence my ongoing interest in what would have happened with the three births afterward if that would have happened.

 

I gained 70lbs with the first, almost entirely water and almost all (like 55lbs worth) in the last few months. No protein in urine, blood pressure was fine the whole time. Had to do NST's three times a week in the last month and go in for repeat blood tests and urine tests as well. (Another doctor friend told me they were probably testing for "street drugs" as that was what she would do?) Lovely, I was not sure what they were testing for and was so very scared at the time I didn't think to ask.

 

I gained the same with the fourth, also a girl and we just didn't worry about it. Both boys were only 20-25lb's so I guess girls puff me up?

 

Induced on birth date, pressured into an early epidural, yelled at by my OBGYN for having to come in early--to a scheduled induction--because the nurse thought I was 6 cm dilated when I was only 2 or so. OBGYN spent the entire labor fighting with the nurses, leaving to make real estate deals for 45 minutes after I had been pushing for hours and came back and vacuumed baby out all the while grumbling that if this didn't work we would need to do a c-section because she couldn't just hang around all night. **I had been in pitocin induced labor for less than 12 hours at this point, and baby was doing great**

 

It was a complete nightmare, and yes doctors like this really do exist and she seemed very sane at all our previous appointments.

 

So yes, in the next few cases I tried to avoid the hospital until I was ready to push! Yet, I really like doctors in general--I just can't stand up to the few "bad" ones while deeply in labor.

 

And, for the record, I would do a homebirth if I could have a midwife and my husband hasn't repeatedly threatened divorce if I even think about it. Trying to not push in the car is not a fun experience, as I am sure others would agree. DH's terrible at births, and volunteered to not attend the last so it shouldn't really be his choice--but I am not interested in fighting about it.smile.gif

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#16 of 27 Old 01-29-2013, 12:38 AM - Thread Starter
 
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If the doctor did not offered you c-section and  the child is brain damaged and dead....then what? You would sue the hospital and the doctor an rightfully so. The doctor knows that c-section, while having risks of its own, lowers maternal and neonatal mortality. They offer and suggest it to you because statistics are on their side.  Of course you can refuse but there is one more thing to think about. Epidural carries fewer risks than general Anestassia. So, waiting until you are  unconscious is not necessary is the best path for you and your baby. Further more, why would you fall unconscious? A fetal demise can happen  with mother being OK for time being.

 

Why not talk to the doctor and see what are the reasons for proposed surgery?

 

I am not sure being rude to a nurse who was doings her job is the best actions. Imagine you came to a coffee shop your talk a Bristol go and "latter yourself".  How we treated is very much influences by our attitude as well. Of course, we all came across rude and uncaring health care workers, but majority of nurse and doctors are there because they love to care for people.  I came across people in the hospitals and clinics were were rude and found that dealing thought official channels, rather than coming down to their level of rudeness was a better way to deal with them as it changes the institutional culture.

 

If you suffer a complications, the  minutes that it take to start an IV could mean difference between life and death  of your baby or yourself.

 

Compare to the birth itself, hep lock is minor nuisance.  IF the nurse was not following your directions regarding hep lock, I suggest you write a letter about your experience to Patients Relations and see how hospital can assist patients  with birth plans. For examples, if you do not want IV in the certain hand, they can put a alert braces on that hand on admission. They already have bracelet like that for mastectomy patients.

 

I am curious to know why did you decide to go to the hospital rather than CU or HBO since you are are not interested in treatment provides in the hospital?

At this  point, I think you must be being deliberately obtuse. The topic was "what if you are a fantastic candidate for a VB AC and end up at a hospital with a blanket rule against it?" And yes, we travel and move and no many other who do the same--this stuff happens.

 

I'll address you once more, since you have changed the post.

 

No one said you should be rude--I didn't even remember telling my nurse to "hep-lock herself", she told me later and I explained what I was trying to say. It was fine, we laughed about it and I apologized for not being able to explain it. Again, that was just an example of something that was supposed to happen and then they let me refuse--even if I didn't make any sense and didn't intend to outright refuse it.

 

All the nurses then apologized for leaving the door wide open and treating THREE separate husbands to a nice glimpse of a completely naked lady birthing her baby (when I ripped off the monitor I also ripped off all my cloths for some reason)  I was  aware that the door was open, and saw all the guys make a double take, but couldn't find the words to ask them to close it. Stuff happens, and I am sure they weren't leaving the door wide open out of spite--I hadn't even "been rude" to the nurse when the door was left open smile.gif

 

This was a crazy fast last stage of birth, and by the time anyone really knew what was happening baby was popping out. No one knew how far along things were, as the monitor only showed weakish contractions and I was still talking and laughing through them until my water broke.

 

Maybe you give birth in a completely calm manner and would therefore have the ability to calmly relay all requests--good for you, for real! I do think that most medical staff would understand that many unmedicated mommy's who are pushing out children can be short with their words, and I assume nurses especially have an understanding of that--I am not sure that barristas would :-)

 

I do think c-sections are a valuable tool, and would not dream to dispute that. This was a hypothetical question posed by my doctor, not an indictment on a medical procedure in general. I hope this clears up the confusion--and it really is very off-topic

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#17 of 27 Old 01-29-2013, 05:09 AM
 
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Just curious... seeing as though you have 9-10 months to plan for the delivery of your child, shouldn't your homework about where you're going to deliver have already been done? I mean, how can you just "end up" at a hospital that does not routinely offer VBAC? If it were me, I'd make sure the OB that is caring for me AND the hospital he/she has priviledges at does do VBAC's. Otherwise, I would switch doctors, therefore, switching the hospital I'd be giving birth at. Health insurance constraints could make this difficult. If you live in a rural area and the local hospital does not do VBAC's then I guess you have to make a decision based on that. However, again, that should be known well ahead of time. OP, you said you move around, even still with an impending birth, shouldn't you stay in one spot for your care and delivery? Or, move somewhere temporarily just to be closer to your ideal situation? That could be difficult especially if finances are tight. All I'm saying is that where you are going to deliver should be determined well ahead of time, and you should already know if they will be able to accommodate your ideal birth plan so there are no surprises. There are so many variables to consider, but that would be the first item on my list.


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#18 of 27 Old 01-29-2013, 06:45 AM
 
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Even when procedures are introduced as a statement rather than a request for consent, that is just how they are used to speaking bc many women seem to want the secure feeling of being told what to do. Being informed and calm when possible got me a lot of "exceptions" to hospital policy. Coming in as late in labor as possible and doing my best to act confident even if I didnt feel it put hospital personell in a less litigious, paranoid state and I was better able to assess what suggestions they truly felt were vital and what was routine.
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#19 of 27 Old 01-29-2013, 08:12 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by erinmattsmom88 View Post

Just curious... seeing as though you have 9-10 months to plan for the delivery of your child, shouldn't your homework about where you're going to deliver have already been done? I mean, how can you just "end up" at a hospital that does not routinely offer VBAC? If it were me, I'd make sure the OB that is caring for me AND the hospital he/she has privileges at does do VBAC's. Otherwise, I would switch doctors, therefore, switching the hospital I'd be giving birth at. Health insurance constraints could make this difficult. If you live in a rural area and the local hospital does not do VBAC's then I guess you have to make a decision based on that. However, again, that should be known well ahead of time. OP, you said you move around, even still with an impending birth, shouldn't you stay in one spot for your care and delivery? Or, move somewhere temporarily just to be closer to your ideal situation? That could be difficult especially if finances are tight. All I'm saying is that where you are going to deliver should be determined well ahead of time, and you should already know if they will be able to accommodate your ideal birth plan so there are no surprises. There are so many variables to consider, but that would be the first item on my list.

All your points are true, and I wasn't actually in this predicament, it was just something my doctor brought up! We were talking about my issues with births and all the rules that hospital have, and also about a few friends who were flat out refused VBAC's just as a policy at the hospital they were at. I've been friends with my doctor for over twenty years, so we chat.

 

Even though I did have 7 months to plan (baby was supposed to have been miscarried according to my first two monthly ER visits for copious bleeding) when I finally got confirmation I was still pregnant we were in the process of moving from Japan to Germany (husband actually moved a week after I left with the kids) and in the middle of this, I needed to take one of my kids to the states for a medical condition. If we hadn't had to go to America I could have easily delivered in country number three, all within the space of one pregnancy. Instead I stayed with all the kids and delivered at a hospital that let us hit the children's hospital and have a good life at the same time. I actually don't think I've been able to start "official" prenatal care before six months pregnant with the last three, just by way of travel and moving. Life happens

 

The huge point you should take from this is, that it's actually not that odd for people who work internationally, or for military spouses, to deal with drastically different hospitals and birthing rules when they are sometimes forcibly moved from the hospital they conceived near. It's also not that odd for a hospital to change their policy mid-pregnancy. I know I would have never thought of this, had I not moved so often myself.

 

I know when we lived in America full time, the health insurance issue was very limiting so I imagine people could get trapped at a hospital they didn't love and that would be the best they could do. Sometimes the only thing we can do is go against the flow-- which is what my doctor,who in the ideal situation was fine with a VBAC, but couldn't do one legally at his hospital, was suggesting. I just wanted to know if anyone had ever done this successfully. 

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#20 of 27 Old 01-29-2013, 08:24 AM
 
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I know when we lived in America full time, the health insurance issue was very limiting so I imagine people could get trapped at a hospital they didn't love and that would be the best they could do. Sometimes the only thing we can do is go against the flow-- which is what my doctor,who in the ideal situation was fine with a VBAC, but couldn't do one legally at his hospital, was suggesting. I just wanted to know if anyone had ever done this successfully. 

Insurance aside, people do deliver in hospitals they do not intend to fairly frequently.  I wanted to deliver my second at a very low risk hospital, but my blood pressure went high and I was post dates…off to major hospital I went.

 

A friend of mine went into early labour  2 hours from home.  She delivered at a hospital she did not intend to.  

 

I think people need to have tips for "how to manage hospital births" in their back pocket in case they do not end up at the hospital of their choice, or their chosen hospital does not live up to its expectations for one reason or another.

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#21 of 27 Old 01-29-2013, 08:58 AM
 
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The responses on this thread perplex me.  OP, I just wanted to say that I completely understand what you're asking.  Does anyone want to share an experience of being in a hospital that did not allow VBACs but achieving one anyway?  Or maybe even experiences of refusing a care provider's suggestions or demands?  I know there are plenty of stories about not consenting to procedures and the range of responses that the hospital staff had-  from accepting the mom's decision politely or in a supportive manner, to forcing a c-section on a mom verbally refusing all the way to the OR. 

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#22 of 27 Old 01-29-2013, 01:29 PM
 
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You can.  They cannot do anything without your permission.  They will make you sign papers saying you acknowledge you are putting the life of your child in danger, etc.  They will lie, and tell you things are wrong to get you to do what they want.  When you get second opinions, they original lieing doctor will try to decredit the second opinion.  Do your research, so you can more easily identify a lie.  I wish I had.


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#23 of 27 Old 01-29-2013, 01:39 PM
 
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All your points are true, and I wasn't actually in this predicament, it was just something my doctor brought up! We were talking about my issues with births and all the rules that hospital have, and also about a few friends who were flat out refused VBAC's just as a policy at the hospital they were at. I've been friends with my doctor for over twenty years, so we chat.

 

Even though I did have 7 months to plan (baby was supposed to have been miscarried according to my first two monthly ER visits for copious bleeding) when I finally got confirmation I was still pregnant we were in the process of moving from Japan to Germany (husband actually moved a week after I left with the kids) and in the middle of this, I needed to take one of my kids to the states for a medical condition. If we hadn't had to go to America I could have easily delivered in country number three, all within the space of one pregnancy. Instead I stayed with all the kids and delivered at a hospital that let us hit the children's hospital and have a good life at the same time. I actually don't think I've been able to start "official" prenatal care before six months pregnant with the last three, just by way of travel and moving. Life happens

 

The huge point you should take from this is, that it's actually not that odd for people who work internationally, or for military spouses, to deal with drastically different hospitals and birthing rules when they are sometimes forcibly moved from the hospital they conceived near. It's also not that odd for a hospital to change their policy mid-pregnancy. I know I would have never thought of this, had I not moved so often myself.

 

I know when we lived in America full time, the health insurance issue was very limiting so I imagine people could get trapped at a hospital they didn't love and that would be the best they could do. Sometimes the only thing we can do is go against the flow-- which is what my doctor,who in the ideal situation was fine with a VBAC, but couldn't do one legally at his hospital, was suggesting. I just wanted to know if anyone had ever done this successfully. 

Ah, I didn't realize you are/were abroad. When you said that you move around I just assumed it was here in this country. Yes, I can imagine things would be more up in the air if you are working internationally, in the military, etc.


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#24 of 27 Old 10-12-2013, 08:25 PM
 
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My son Joshua was born five months ago. I tried a vaginal delivery but after 4 hours of pushing he was born via c section. He had a large head. I also feel sad about having to do it that way but am happy that he is healthy.
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#25 of 27 Old 11-02-2013, 09:14 PM
 
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An OBS at my hospital told me a story about someone he wanted to induce at 42+ weeks and set up an appointment for it but she said no and went garage sailing instead.  She gave birth at 43 weeks naturally.  My hospital is very pro natural birth.

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#26 of 27 Old 11-04-2013, 04:44 PM
 
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With my 3rd child I tried to do a VBA2C but I never did go in to labor before my scheduled c-section and I really wanted a tubal ligation at the same time so I went with it. But I do believe that both my 2nd and 3rd child could have been delivered vaginally had I really tried harder. It's my fault they weren't but I love them nonetheless (4 yrs old and 11 years old) and loved the birth experience no less. :)


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#27 of 27 Old 01-23-2014, 07:56 AM
 
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My first birth was an emergency c section the second was a vbac it went well my third they wanted to cut me of course I went to a different doctors this time wich I hate .I went into labor at 28 weeks baby was coming out but yet they still cut me but this time up and down im so mad because I have a t on my stomach and I wonder if u Will ever be able to have a baby vbac again?
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