Terrified of upcoming C-section. Please share your positive C-section outcomes/resources!! - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 20 Old 04-16-2014, 11:41 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hello everyone-

I am 25 weeks along in my first pregnancy. Two ultrasounds have confirmed a complete placenta previa--my placenta is literally dead centered at the bottom of my uterus and completely covering my cervix, so while this complication can resolve, the chances of this one fully resolving and allowing for my planned homebirth is very slim. I was told to switch to a doctor (away from the midwife I had been seeing) since I am considered high risk and will likely need a C-section.

 

I am really sad at the loss of what I hoped and envisioned would be an uncomplicated natural birth. But I've realized I am very scared of a C-section. I'm afraid that I'll give birth early (they won't let you go full-term or start labor with placenta previa; it's common to be delivered around 36 weeks). I'm afraid the baby will be premature or need to stay in the hospital. I'm afraid of not bonding as well with my baby b/c of the whole scary/abnormal situation, that breastfeeding could be more difficult for us, and that caring for my baby as I recover from the C-section will be hard.

 

There aren't a lot of positive stories about C-sections out there...most of my life I've read the opposite which is why I wanted a non-intervention homebirth so badly.

 

If you have any positive experiences you can share that might help ease my fears, please do take the time to share it. Or if you know of any good books or resources that might help me ease these fears, that would be very helpful. These last few days have been tough and my mind is full of worries now, whereas I previously didn't have any fears about labor and delivery.

 

Thank you so much!!!

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#2 of 20 Old 04-16-2014, 12:58 PM
 
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My second c section wasn't as bad as the first. The second was planned so I didn't go into it exhausted which I think made a difference with recovery. I never had a natural birth so I can't compare. I did get to see baby once they were out. It was brief but once out of the OR we were reunited.
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#3 of 20 Old 04-16-2014, 01:24 PM
 
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I had a c-section for placenta previa about 4.5 years ago, so I had to hit this.  I'm so sorry you're going through this.  I hope you have a really boring time of it, and a baby in your arms after a planned section.  It's the best option in your case.

 

I found my c-section really calm and peaceful, although I had been terrified going in.  It was 100% necessary, it saved our lives, and it was done by caring and skilled people who did everything they could to help both of us.  Would I rather things have gone otherwise?  Absolutely.  But there are worse things than landing in the safety net, and I have no regrets.  DD was pretty premature (delivered at 32w4d), and spent 32 days in the NICU.  This completely sucked, except that a few weeks before her due date, we walked out of the hospital with DD, who is preposterous and wonderful and mischevous and all the things children her age are supposed to be, and the love that we have for her cannot possibly fit in such a small container as her sweet little self, or the greater metropolitan area in which we live. 

 

We did not bond instantly.  I was a wreck, actually.  In the ten months before DD was born, I got pregnant, miscarried, got pregnant again, and then got smacked by a nasty complication.  I was really emotionally distant from the whole situation for a long time.  I had PPD, and by the time we brought home a normal newborn, I was already as tired as if I'd been staying up all night with a baby for a month.  It was very painful then.  In the long run, it turns out to have mattered far less then I feared it would.  There is a tendency in NCB literature to present the first moments after birth as all important, but in fact, it is the accretion of moments over months and years that creates and nurtures strong emotional bonds. 

 

Breast feeding was also harder for us - DD was born too early to breast feed at birth, which is hopefully a problem you won't have.  There is no denying that it's easier to nurse a baby in your arms then it is to nurse a baby in the NICU, but it's not impossible.  (Also, I would encourage you to prioritize getting the baby home over avoiding formula - the baby has to take all feeds by mouth to get home.  If you can do that with breastmilk in the NICU, awesome.  But if bottles mean you can leave earlier, I think exclusive breast feeding is easier to accomplish in your own house.)

 

What would help you feel better?  Would it help you to tour the NICU at the hospital where you're planning to deliver?  Can you discuss the things you want with your doctors, and make plans that suit you?  Can you bring an extra support person so that you aren't alone if your partner needs to follow the baby to the NICU, and you can run messages back and forth?

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#4 of 20 Old 04-22-2014, 07:19 PM
 
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:(My last csection was a failed vbac. Besides the circuis of it being emergent it was great. quick, I got baby on my chest and wheeled out of the OR, they checked him really quick and gave him back for skin to skin. Breastfed immediately, did the breast crawl. No problems bonding or anything. There are a lot of positive csections stories. Probably won't find them in abundance on this site
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#5 of 20 Old 04-26-2014, 06:37 PM
 
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I've had two c-sections, 7 and 9 years ago. With my first I had a long difficult labor before the c-section, but my pelvic bone was apparently too narrow to push her through. It was kind of traumatic because it wasn't planned and I had had the awful labor beforehand but even still it was all just fine as soon as I held her. The way she came I to the world didn't matter, it only mattered that she was safe.

With my son it he c-sec was scheduled and much easier to recover from. I was scared, but it went very smoothly. It was so much easier than the labor I had with my first child. I went in, relaxed, and didn't feel a thing! I remember thinking that the worst part was the catheter before the surgery lol. I had absolutely no issues with bonding, nursing, recovering, etc. I was even able to care for the new baby and m almost 2 year old alone a week after his birth.

If I had a choice I would choose a more natural birth, but I didn't and it sounds like you don't either. Honestly, all these years later I barely remember their births, I just remember holding that precious baby in my arms.
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#6 of 20 Old 04-26-2014, 08:37 PM
 
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I had a completely natural birth with my first, everything was perfect. When I became pregnant again and found out it was twins I made sure to find a doc that would deliver the twins vaginally. Everything was going wonderf until they found TTTS. A placenta issue with the girls! We had to be flown out of state for emergency surgery in utero and with that went any possibility of vaginal birth. So then came the C section. I didn't want it at all but had no choice! The procedure itself went fine. One of my girls passed away the next day and the other one spent 70 days in the NICU. So here is my advice to prepare. Things I wish I had looked up prior to and things that worked for me. 1- if you are have to find a doctor, take the time to research NICUs also. The set ups are different in different hospitals. If at all possible find one with private rooms or at least cubbies, where you can stay with baby overnight and/ or have some privacy. 2- have a plan for the possibility of direct nursing not being an option at the beginning. I started pumping 3 hours after my c section. First few pumps sessions of 15 mins each yielded no milk whatsoever. Not a drop! Don't worry about that. Keep going! Pump every 2 to 3 hours. Give baby the freshest milk you can. 3- if you are pumping don't be afraid to say - no formula! Baby can be fed breast milk on a bottle just as easily! 3- always use slow flow nipples when feeding baby through bottle. ( helps with the transition to breast). Put baby to breast as soon as possible. 4- be clear about what the goals are for the doctors( for the baby) to start nursing snd be ready to go home and stay on them. 5- for you, get support for the belly. I felt like my inside were falling to the ground every time I moved for the first 2 days. It was awful! On the third day upon dismissal from the hospital, they have me a belly support thing. Made all the difference and I wish I had it from day one! So if they don't give you one right away, ask for kne and if not, send someone to buy one! It is a difference maker. 6- research and information. Get informed as much as you can so you will have less surprises. Formulate a plan B and a C so you are ready for anything! On a more encouraging note, lots of babies are ready to go home right away after being born at 35 weeks, so stay positive!
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#7 of 20 Old 04-26-2014, 08:53 PM
 
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Don't be afraid.  My sister had to have C-sections with both her children.  Bringing a baby into the world is beautiful no matter how they arrive!  My sister had no problems bonding with her babies, and both were very healthy.  That said, I had a natural birth and a baby who ended up in NICU after birth.  It was the last thing I expected.  No birth can really be "planned".  My natural birth experience was not a great one, and I was unprepared for the reality of it, I think too many people make natural birth sound like a fairytale and its not!  in addition, I have a friend who was in your same boat, and her placenta moved just enough for a natural birth just a week before baby came!  she was shocked because she had been so prepared for a C-section.  So, I must say it again, no birth can really be planned.  just look forward to the moment you have that baby in your arms, and you wont care how he/she got there, I promise!  you will be ok! blessings!:joy

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#8 of 20 Old 04-26-2014, 09:07 PM
 
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Yeah I was told the same thing. 25 w is way, way to early for doom and gloom about pp. I question the advice you are receiving.

That being said, my sister has had four (3 planned) with smooth recoveries and breastfeeding success. Her dh acts as her advocate to get the baby to her as soon as possible and he is well educated on early bf, which is her primary concern
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#9 of 20 Old 04-27-2014, 02:05 AM
 
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I have had two caesars. Neither planned nor wanted but also not traumatic. I was able to hold and breastfeed both girls with 10 minutes of them being born. I also had both of them in recovery with me.

With DD1 I had some problems with breastfeeding but I don't believe they were related to the c/s. My milk came in within 3 days each time as you would expect and I had no supply issues.

My advice would be to discuss with whomever has the power to facilitate, or thwart, you about what you want. This is probably a paed or paed nurse in the US. They will be the one who has your baby so they need to know you want him/her on your chest etc. if you think this is likely to be a problem then see if you can talk to them in advance. If not, on the day should be ok.

I'd also suggest that you have regular, adequate pain relief. Pain can inhibit your milk production and reduce your mobility. Where I work, women have a PCA/PCEA for the first 24hrs. They have PR ibuprofen in theatre and start regular oral paracetamol (6hrly) and diclofenac (8hrly) OR ibuprofen (6hrly) as soon as they can eat. After the PCA comes down they have an opioid (usually oxycodone) 4th hourly as needed. For most women this allows them to be mobile and comfortable and able to care for their babies.

And, finally, it's ok to grieve. Even if your c/a is totally essential and you agree to it and are grateful you live where it is available and safe, it doesn't mean that you want it and don't wish that things could be different so you and your baby could experience and have the benefits of natural birth.
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#10 of 20 Old 04-27-2014, 04:37 AM
 
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Yeah I was told the same thing. 25 w is way, way to early for doom and gloom about pp. I question the advice you are receiving.

I totslly agree that 25 weeks is early for doom and gloom, and there's time for placental movement, but:
1. A really centered previa really won't shift enough.
2. Everyone told me it was too early to think about c/s for previa my entire pregnancy. End result: I lost the chance to make a lot of meaningful choices, and my emergency surgery occurred in the hospital with the closest NICU to our house. That happened to be a good hospital, and everything was eventually fine. Nonetheless, I felt that by refusing to think negative and discuss contingency planning, the CNMs I'd been seeing hung me out to dry.

No one told me how likely early delivery was. I was seeing a therapist and talking about my need for a healing natural birth - I could have asked her to discuss c/s with me if anyone had acted like it was appropriate to consider it. I could have toured some NICUs and gone in with more information. I could have packed a go bag. I could have used the time to prepare. If anyone I was talking to had admitted I might need that.

That said - it is absolutely fine to insist on one last ultrasound for placental location, even right before c/s. Placentas do shift.
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#11 of 20 Old 04-27-2014, 08:56 PM
 
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Nikole, I went through the same thing 7-1/2 years ago.  

 

I was incredibly disappointed and scared about the previa when I found out.  I really disagree with the PP who told you 25 weeks is too early for "doom and gloom."  First, 25 weeks is pretty darn well-along to know if you have a complete, centered previa.  Those don't usually move. Think about it - the placenta's "movemaent" is a lot because the uterus is getting bigger, different parts of it at different rates, so the relative positions of things can change.  They told me that a placenta like my daughter's, which was just about centered over the cervix, wouldn't move, and it didn't.  But I also don't agree with the "doom and gloom" part.  I wanted a natural homebirth.  I had had a lot of medical experiences before my pregnancy, and I actually work in medicine, and I HATE the loss of personhood and the loss of power and control over yourself that can happen in a hospital.  At first, I lay awake at night dreading that.  Here's this thing that's supposed to just be a part of life, and I'm going to have to go into a damn hospital.  It didn't happen the way I wanted it, that's for sure, but by the time it rolled around I was resigned to a cesarean.  I realized what I wanted most was a baby, not a birth.

 

The absolute inevitability of the cesarean shifted my thinking fairly quickly.  In some of the seminal modern midwifery texts there are accounts of ancient midwives figuring out how to get mothers through this alive at pretty good rates.  No mention of any babies surviving, for the obvious reason it would be impossible.  So there was just no point to me in thinking about the homebirth I had wanted anymore, so I didn't.  At first, I was going to be headed to the "high risk" clinic here where they see you like every week the whole time.  I asked around and found an MD OB whom I actually liked.  She didn't do tons of extra tests and visits and didn't make me go to the high-risk clinic.  She said if I started to bleed get my butt in, but placenta previa isn't associated with any increased risk of blood pressure problems or gestational diabetes or really anything, so I didn't need the extra visits and the med students oooing and ahhhing and a gazillion exams.  My homebirth midwife kept seeing me, and the OB left checking my BP and weight to her (very cool!).  The OB said she hoped to be able to get the baby right up on my breast in the OR.

 

So we scheduled it, and I didn't quite make it.  I did start bleeding, and my daughter was delivered emergently.  We had a very weird complication - a huge amount of her blood transfused through the damaged placenta into my bloodstream, most likely right before or during the birth.  It's got a fancy name and I wouldn't worry about it if I were you.  But really, what it meant was that even my altered "birth plan" didn't happen.  My daughter was born in hemorrhagic shock and respiratory distress, and nearly died.  She got an emergency O-negative transfusion and spent about a week in the NICU.  

 

It was awful - very frightening, and very jarring.  It was truly a nightmare.  I had never been more frightened in my life than I was during her first few hours when she was stabilizing.  That anxiety stayed with me a long time.  

 

So that's all the bad.  There was also good.  

 

Although we did have a hard time with breastfeeding because (for good reasons) she had to start on bottles in the hospital and it was a challenge to switch her over to the breast, we got there.  I had read La Leche League publications with stories of women who perservered pumping and doing all sorts of things for far longer than we did (3 weeks after going home).  Those stories gave me strength.  Patience, creativity, and a good lactation consultant.  My milk came in great despite only being stimulated by the pump for those first 3 weeks, and my daughter never had anything except my milk until she was a big old sitting-up by herself baby.  She nursed until she was over 3.

 

I recovered amazingly quickly.  Never had much pain, didn't have much lochia.  Never had a contraction so I didn't have the fatigue of having been through labor.  My incision was really just a nuisance.  It wasn't painful enough to really bother me.  

 

Despite being born a little early with only half her blood, my daughter is a beautiful normal little girl.  She is kind and creative, just a sweet, good person.  We are reading "The Secret Garden" and she is loving it.  She's a good swimmer and especially likes to pretend she is an otter or a seal.

 

I cannot imagine having bonded any more strongly to her than I did when I first really saw her in the NICU.  I knew I would jump in front of a train for her from the moment I saw her.  My mom flew in, and she, my partner, and I spent long shifts holding and rocking my daughter next to her NICU bed.  She wasn't so fragile that we had to worry about tiring her, so she got held as much as many babies.  We really made the best of it.  And I have never felt anything as powerful as what I felt when the NICU doctor, my partner and I were standing around her bed, I said something, and she tracked over to my voice.  "Well, she knows who's 'mama,'" the doctor said, and so did I.  I love my daughter incredibly.  I can't imagine loving her more if we had had a sweet homebirth.  I can't imagine loving her more, period.  

 

You have some advantages being in this situation.  Yes, you lose the homebirth.  You lose a lot.  But you don't lose it in the middle of labor, ex****ted, like a lot of women do.  You have time to adjust to a new set of expectations.  I know women who struggle with feeling that somehow they had failed when for whatever reason have a vaginal birth converted to a cesarean.  For me, and I hope for you, there was no dealing with a sense of personal failure.  There is nothing you or I could have done to prevent or change the previa.  

 

I also think that there's just too much emphasis placed on the "birth" experience.  It's an inadvertent side effect of what I think is a legitimate movement in this country to to take back normal birth.  Normal childbirth is insanely medicalized here and it makes sense that women try to regain control of the process.  Ideally birth is a natural thing, part of life, and belongs to the woman.  Some of us by bad luck don't get "ideally."  But if you're luckier than I was, which by all odds you should be, you ****l may have a comparatively lovely cesarean.  And you will have a baby.

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#12 of 20 Old 04-27-2014, 09:18 PM
 
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I agree that 25 weeks is not to early to be considering and researching your options. While placentas do move (not just through uterine growth, google placental migration) it is very unusual for a completely centred praevia to clear the os. Generally to ones which move are the marginal praevias.

I have had two caesars. I actually found the recovery fairly easy. I think it makes a big difference if you haven't laboured first. Take regular, adequate pain relief. You will be slow-moving but I had no trouble with baby care.

Assuming your babe is born at about 36 weeks there is a good chance she won't need to much time in nursery. Obviously term is ideal but I have certainly looked after 36 week babes who just needed a bit of extra help with their temperature regulation and who took a bit longer to get the hang of sucking. I don't know how your hospital is set up but where I work these babies are often "admitted" to special care but actually spend all their time on the ward with mum. They are allocated a SCBU nurse each shift and s/he comes over as needed to check on the baby and we can call them or mums can walk over with them if they need anything. We also have lactation consultants 7 days a week who go to recovery to help initiate breastfeeding with all the booked caesars. Might be good to find out what resources your hospital has.

You could also talk to them about things like having the baby put straight onto your chest and going to recovery with you if they don't need NICU care straight away. Those things can help with bonding and breastfeeding.
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#13 of 20 Old 04-28-2014, 01:29 PM
 
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Katelove, thanks for correcting me about the migration.  My understanding was that most of the late "movement" was because that lower section of the uterus expands proportionally more late in the pregnancy, but you are absolutely right about the placenta creeping around - I didn't know it was as much as it is.  

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#14 of 20 Old 04-28-2014, 02:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I just wanted to thank all of your for your encouragement and replies. I am feeling a lot better about the whole situation and have received a lot of support. I'm finally in a mental place where I can visualize having a C-section without crying about it all the time. I realize it is fortunate to know and to be able to mentally prepare for it. In other good news, I am continuing prenatal care with my midwife and she will act as my doula in the hospital, using her backup doctor for the surgery assuming nothing changes/moves. Her doc (vs. a brand new one), whom I have seen and is familiar with me and my goals, will likely be very sympathetic in my situation and I know also gives the baby directly to mom after birth assuming it has no issues. I am also attending a LLL meeting next month to get more information on pumping, possible breastfeeding complications to be prepared for given the circumstances, etc. So all in all, this time has really been a blessing and will help me be as prepared as possible for almost any situation, which is a real plus side.

 

Thank you again. <3

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#15 of 20 Old 06-08-2014, 12:21 PM
 
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I agree that going into a planned section has its advantages as far as cesareans go. I had mine after 36+ hours of a labor which I found incredibly painful, difficult and traumatic, and I was beyond exhausted. I won't lie either, much as I wanted it all to end and was relieved that it was going to be over soon....I was still terrified. I'd never had surgery before that! I was amazed how fast they worked. It goes super quick and your baby is born! And, despite all the challenges of my son's birth....after all was said and done....it was a sublime magical moment when my son was handed to my husband and held up to my head, forehead to forehead meeting for the first time "outside". I don't think being in an operating room took one bit of that first moment's magic away. Not at all! Luckily I was in a certified "baby friendly" hospital and they very quickly wiped him off and put him right on my chest and he stayed there the rest of the afternoon. Since you have time, try to find a hospital where they will do this if your baby is healthy and normal, rather than whisk him/her away for many minutes or more.
Best of luck! I see you started this thread awhile back, it looks like the date is just around the corner!

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#16 of 20 Old 06-09-2014, 11:05 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you. We just had our 32-week ultrasound last week and there was no change in the placenta position. I've also had 5-6 bleeding episodes and almost daily spotting for weeks. I am fortunate to have not had anything bad and to not be on bed rest! But we know now to plan for sure for the Cesarean. I am really really sad still. I thought I was getting over it and accepting it, but I have a really hard time picturing it. I am very anxious in hospitals and during procedures. I just hope I can get over those fears as much as possible so that my experience isn't traumatic. I am doing my best and trying to focus on the positives.

Luckily, my doc is a backup doc for my homebirth midwife so she really 'gets it.' She is a proponent of immediate and uninterrupted skin-to-skin right after a Csection as well and the hospital where we will delivery is certified 'baby friendly' which will mean less hurdles for us to jump to create the experience we want.

Thank you all for you replies and support.
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#17 of 20 Old 06-16-2014, 03:14 AM
 
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I had a planned C-section in December and it was AMAZING!

So nice and peaceful and exciting. The staff was lovely, I had skin to skin very quickly and it was just magic. I was up and walking six hours later, had very little pain the next day and no pain, but just discomfort the day after that.

There was a lot of family support, so I didn't have to jump up and do housework, etc, but could concentrate on breastfeeding and bonding. Six months later, my baby boy is still EBF and we are incredibly bonded.

The scar looks like a stretchmark, it is just at the pubic line, so not overly visible. It healed VERY fast.

My advice would be to take it VERY easy afterwards, especially if you DO feel good enough to do more things, you know? I didn't do that and ended up with a seizure three days later and back in hospital, but that had nothing to do with the section as I had one 6 weeks before due date as well, it was pregnancy related.

I wish you all the best, sections CAN be lovely, and it DOES feel like birth and you CAN breastfeed.
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#18 of 20 Old 06-16-2014, 08:39 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I had a planned C-section in December and it was AMAZING!

So nice and peaceful and exciting. The staff was lovely, I had skin to skin very quickly and it was just magic. I was up and walking six hours later, had very little pain the next day and no pain, but just discomfort the day after that.

There was a lot of family support, so I didn't have to jump up and do housework, etc, but could concentrate on breastfeeding and bonding. Six months later, my baby boy is still EBF and we are incredibly bonded.

The scar looks like a stretchmark, it is just at the pubic line, so not overly visible. It healed VERY fast.

My advice would be to take it VERY easy afterwards, especially if you DO feel good enough to do more things, you know? I didn't do that and ended up with a seizure three days later and back in hospital, but that had nothing to do with the section as I had one 6 weeks before due date as well, it was pregnancy related.

I wish you all the best, sections CAN be lovely, and it DOES feel like birth and you CAN breastfeed.
Thank you so much for taking the time to share that positive experience. The more time that passes, the more accepting I am becoming. I am trying to focus more on the excitement of meeting my baby vs. HOW the baby arrives. Thank you again. So glad yours went well for you, too.
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#19 of 20 Old 06-20-2014, 10:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nikolem2 View Post
If you have any positive experiences you can share that might help ease my fears, please do take the time to share it. Or if you know of any good books or resources that might help me ease these fears, that would be very helpful.
A while back, I came across a really interesting book called 'Choosing Caesarean'. I still haven't had a chance to read this in its entirety, but I read the introduction and flipped through and read some other bits (yes, I'm one of those people who stands there in bookstores reading books...) The book is actually aimed at women who want a Caesarean rather than a vaginal birth, or at least are thinking about that option, but it strikes me as something you might find helpful.

The book makes the point that Caesareans get a very bad press because so many of the studies lump together emergency and elective Caesareans but in fact these are entirely different. Which, when you think about it, makes sense. Emergency C/Ss are typically done after hours of difficult labour, when the woman's body is already exhausted, and they have to be done in a hurry. So, looking at all C/Ss as though they were all the same makes elective CS look far worse than it actually is. In fact, one really big advantage of elective C/S is that it's the surest way of avoiding emergency C/S. You also avoid ending up with a forceps birth, a vacuum birth, or vaginal tears/damage to the pelvic floor. Because of this, when the outcomes for women who have planned prelabour CSs are compared to women who try for vaginal births they're actually much more closely matched in terms of their pros and cons. I was absolutely fascinated, as this way of looking at it had simply never occurred to me.

Now, that in itself isn't much help to you - after all, even a planned CS does have disadvantages as well as advantages and isn't what everybody wants, and the fact that it has some advantages doesn't at all change the fact that it isn't the way you wanted things to go. That sucks for you and I'm not at all trying to convince you otherwise. But what I loved about that book, and what I hope will be helpful to you, is the change in perspective from the way CS is normally presented. I know that all the way through my pregnancy, everything I was reading made vaginal birth out to be the best option that everyone should be aiming for with CS being a poor second-best, and the messages I received around it were very much this damned-with-faint-praise thing of 'well, it isn't necessarily going to be that terrible...' and I was convinced that if I ended up with a CS I would have missed out on this wonderful vaginal birth experience and had to make do with second best. So it was an absolute revelation to me to have it, instead, presented as a different but equally valid alternative option that, in fact, quite a lot of women were quite legitimately deciding was right for them. It was such a different perspective. And, of course, it also has a chapter of stories of women who had elective Caesareans and were really pleased with them - so, if that's still what you're looking for, check that out.

One anecdotal experience to add - that of my sister, who had her first baby by vaginal birth and her second by elective section and found the section much better. If you want, I can get in touch with her and ask her for her thoughts on all the things she preferred/liked about it.

Good luck with your birth and I hope it's a wonderful one - and, more importantly, the doorway through to an awesome motherhood experience!
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#20 of 20 Old 06-25-2014, 10:17 AM
 
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I want to PM you later when I'm at my PC. I'd love to share my experience with you. If I should forget, feel free to nudge me.

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