Are There Benefits to Ignoring Our Children? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 11 Old 04-03-2013, 12:12 PM - Thread Starter
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Find out what Mothering blogger Sarah Clark has to say in her newest article "The Benefits of Ignoring Children (Sometimes)."

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#2 of 11 Old 05-09-2013, 04:52 AM
 
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In which sense you asking about the benefits ignoring children I didn't understand.

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#3 of 11 Old 05-09-2013, 07:55 AM
 
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I think if you read the article you will understand exactly what she is talking about. Read the article then come back and add your comments! Best!!

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#4 of 11 Old 05-09-2013, 08:23 AM
 
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I agree with the article. Obviously, this wouldn't apply to an infant and the author makes that clear. I work with children and I'm often taken aback by the lack of inner-resourcefulness some of these kiddos have. They need to have an adult tell them what to do all.the.time. Sometimes we need to give kids the freedom to just be and learn to work things out for themselves.

&
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#5 of 11 Old 05-09-2013, 03:04 PM
 
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I totally agree.  When I was 4 to 5 I went to 'lumberjack daycare'.  I went to work with my dad and ran wild in the woods, climbed on wood piles, and danced around the fire.  I took naps on the floor of the garage amidst a pile of mongrel puppies.  Best. Days. Ever.  EVER. 
 

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#6 of 11 Old 05-31-2013, 12:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tracyamber View Post

I think if you read the article you will understand exactly what she is talking about. Read the article then come back and add your comments! Best!!

 

ROTFLMAO.gif

The title of the thread certainly caught my attention, and I did go into it with a similar attitude, before turning towards the article in the post. Despite the (intended?) eyebrow-raising title, the author does indeed address an important matter with a quite logical explanation of the reasoning behind the offer for the overprotective parents to take it down a notch or two. The encouraged sense of competition in our daily activities will require of the children to grow up strong physically, mentally as well as in terms of emotional intelligence, all of which is developed though interaction and exploration, learning the responsibilities and costs of ones' actions.

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#7 of 11 Old 06-01-2013, 01:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Memebee View Post

 

ROTFLMAO.gif

The title of the thread certainly caught my attention, and I did go into it with a similar attitude, before turning towards the article in the post. Despite the (intended?) eyebrow-raising title, the author does indeed address an important matter with a quite logical explanation of the reasoning behind the offer for the overprotective parents to take it down a notch or two. The encouraged sense of competition in our daily activities will require of the children to grow up strong physically, mentally as well as in terms of emotional intelligence, all of which is developed though interaction and exploration, learning the responsibilities and costs of ones' actions.

Funny thing is My ds refuses to be ignored.......:( I think when he gets a bit older things will change..he is 2!

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#8 of 11 Old 06-01-2013, 01:55 PM
 
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Originally Posted by tracyamber View Post

Funny thing is My ds refuses to be ignored.......greensad.gif I think when he gets a bit older things will change..he is 2!

I doubt it! My son's a teen, and *still* refuses to be ignored! He is also determined to make this world a better place. I hope he succeeds!
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#9 of 11 Old 06-02-2013, 11:53 AM
 
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I doubt it! My son's a teen, and *still* refuses to be ignored! He is also determined to make this world a better place. I hope he succeeds!

Well then, please give strategies as to how you deal with it...........I will drive myself crazy if I have 10 plus more years...lol!!

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#10 of 11 Old 06-02-2013, 08:06 PM
 
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I keep in mind that I want him to be the best *adult* he can be. If his behavior is something that will be good when he's an adult (like persistence or leadership) then I support it. Whining is not helpful so I explain that it is the whining I object to, and will not reward it.

It's kind of difficult to explain, but I hope you get the idea, and I've answered your question.
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#11 of 11 Old 06-02-2013, 09:27 PM
 
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pek64~ Yeah, you're right on! Thanks for that perspective!!!

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