Hello Vaccinating Parents! - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 61 Old 09-14-2013, 01:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
MichelleZB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)

This is a roll-call thread! I'm a mom of one 21-month-old son, and he has all of his vaccinations according to the Canadian schedule.

 

Introduce yourselves!

teacozy likes this.
MichelleZB is offline  
#2 of 61 Old 09-15-2013, 09:39 AM
 
teacozy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Hogwarts
Posts: 1,387
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 249 Post(s)
Hi Michelle!

I have an an almost 18 month old son who is vaccinated on the US schedule.

He's healthy as a horse, has never needed an antibiotic and has only ever gone to the doctor for well baby check ups. Well, that's not completely true. He rolled off the bed once when he was 6 months old and got a little bloody nose and goose egg and I brought him in as a precaution.

Other than that he's been perfect smile.gif

“The good thing about science is that it's true whether or not you believe in it.” ~ Neil deGrasse Tyson 
teacozy is offline  
#3 of 61 Old 09-15-2013, 10:28 AM
 
Dakotacakes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 152
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Mom to a 2 1/2 year old boy vaccinated on the US schedule. He has been blessed with daddy's immune system and has nott been sick much at all. Never needed medicine yet. Had one ear infection at 4 months but otherwise only well baby visits. Will be getting a flu shot in a few weeks
teacozy likes this.
Dakotacakes is offline  
#4 of 61 Old 09-15-2013, 12:27 PM
 
prosciencemum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,729
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)
I've got 2 - they're 6 and 3 now. We moved from US to UK with the eldest, so her schedule's a mush of those two. Younger one on UK schedule which has some vaccines US doesn't and not others it does. The recommended timings differ a bit too. smile.gif

Should we ask to transfer some of the more "on schedule" feeling threads from the other board, or better to start afresh and just link back (eg I'm thinking the "my kid just had a shot thread"), or the ones about why people on schedule might want a support board from MDC.
teacozy likes this.

Mother of two living in UK. Daughter (2007) born in USA, son (2010) born here. I'm pro natural birth, midwife care, breastfeeding, co-sleeping, baby wearing and a keen advocate of cloth diapering. I'm a full time working research scientist (physical sciences) and I'm pro-vaccine.

prosciencemum is online now  
#5 of 61 Old 09-15-2013, 03:01 PM
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Hello! I have one daughter aged 2 years and a bit. She has had all the vaccines on the US schedule (except rotavirus, which her doc said she would order and didn't). We did space them a little, but I feel I belong here more than in selective/delayed because my default is to be in favor of vaccines and I may tweak a few, versus defaulting to being scared/worried about vaccines. 

erigeron is offline  
#6 of 61 Old 09-16-2013, 06:52 AM
 
pepperedmoth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I totally think you belong here, erigeron:love

 

Hi! I'm Rosemary. Expecting my first in March. Obviously no vaccinations yet, but if I could vaccinate in the womb I probably would. :thumb

 

prosciencemum, I don't really have an opinion one way or another on transferring threads vs starting new ones and linking back . . . 

 

Pleased to meet everyone and SO HAPPY that we have our own space!

pepperedmoth is offline  
#7 of 61 Old 09-16-2013, 07:53 AM - Thread Starter
 
MichelleZB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
You do belong here, Erigeron! As we're learning here, schedules differ from country to country so our kids might be getting things in different orders or different timings. Actually, perhaps we should start a thread about the different schedules!

I "delayed" my son's 12-month shots. When we came in, he was quite sick with a cold so they told me to come in later. The next appointment available was 6 weeks later.

When they get them isn't an exact science. The main thing is to get those antibodies working.

I think the main thing is that, in general, we all
1) have a basic understanding of how vaccines work
2) view them as generally safe
3) view them to be generally worth the risk to help prevent diseases
4) view the medical recommendations surrounding them (like schedules and dosage) to be generally well enough conceived
5) believe that society benefits as a whole with a vaccinated population

I don't know, is that a pretty good summary of how we feel as a group?
prosciencemum and pudlenka like this.
MichelleZB is offline  
#8 of 61 Old 09-16-2013, 07:55 AM - Thread Starter
 
MichelleZB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Btw: re vaccinating in the womb. If your vaccines are up to date, Pepperedmoth, your infant will benefit from that. S/he will get your antibodies through your breast milk.
prosciencemum likes this.
MichelleZB is offline  
#9 of 61 Old 09-16-2013, 08:45 AM
 
Katie8681's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Northern Cali
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

My son, 2, is vaccinated on the US schedule. Where I live I'm an exception :)  


At home amongst the redwoods treehugger.gif with my husband and my son, born 7/5/11 familybed1.gif  Instant CNM, just add caffix.gif !

Katie8681 is offline  
#10 of 61 Old 09-17-2013, 08:33 AM
 
cwill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I have a 20 month old son, vaccinated on schedule.  He's had one ear infection in his life.  Otherwise no illness, no allergies, no rashes...

 

Vaccines were a hot topic for me before I even had kids.  My background is in infectious disease with a bit of immunology thrown in and pseudoscience used to really make me rage.  I'm much less passionate when it comes to trying to teach the internet about science these days, but it's still a strong interest of mine. 

Fillyjonk and prosciencemum like this.
cwill is offline  
#11 of 61 Old 09-17-2013, 10:58 AM
 
chickabiddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,483
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by erigeron View Post We did space them a little, but I feel I belong here more than in selective/delayed because my default is to be in favor of vaccines and I may tweak a few, versus defaulting to being scared/worried about vaccines. 

 

This is me as well.  I have an 11yo who is fully vaxed although we did do the infant shots one at a time to check for reactions, which resulted in delays for some of them.  I am also torn about the HPV vax and am probably going to delay that one at this point (eta: if anyone wants to try to talk me in or out of that, I won't consider that unsupportive, because I am truly seeking information and preferably from a pro-vax p.o.v..)

 

My daughter is amazingly healthy.  She has had one sick visit -- strep -- to the doctor, ever (there have been well-child checks and a few visits for injuries, but only one related to illness), and she has had perfect attendance in school for the past three years.


Carseat-checking (CPST) and WAH mama to a twelve-year-old girl.
chickabiddy is online now  
#12 of 61 Old 09-17-2013, 10:58 AM
 
pepperedmoth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 222
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichelleZB View Post

Btw: re vaccinating in the womb. If your vaccines are up to date, Pepperedmoth, your infant will benefit from that. S/he will get your antibodies through your breast milk.

 

Thanks, Michelle! I knew that, but it was tucked away in one of those inaccessible cortical folds . . . now I'll remember, and it's reassuring indeed. 

 
I am indeed up to date on all my vaccines. I live in an area with high non-vaccination rates, and I'm definitely worried about my little one contracting pertussis (a lot of that goes around in Vermont) in those vulnerable first two months. 
 
Yay for breast feeding!
pepperedmoth is offline  
#13 of 61 Old 09-17-2013, 11:01 AM
 
chickabiddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,483
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)

Yes, definitely, nurse that baby!  You will pass on your antibodies, and if you are exposed you will make even more antibodies to pass on.

prosciencemum likes this.

Carseat-checking (CPST) and WAH mama to a twelve-year-old girl.
chickabiddy is online now  
#14 of 61 Old 09-17-2013, 08:45 PM - Thread Starter
 
MichelleZB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickabiddy View Post
 

 I am also torn about the HPV vax and am probably going to delay that one at this point (eta: if anyone wants to try to talk me in or out of that, I won't consider that unsupportive, because I am truly seeking information and preferably from a pro-vax p.o.v..)

 

So, why are you torn? What are the points against the HPV shot? Is it just too expensive?

MichelleZB is offline  
#15 of 61 Old 09-17-2013, 11:31 PM
 
Fillyjonk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 825
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)

All mine were vaccinated on schedule pretty much. My younger ones have been later and later off schedule, mainly because I'm disorganised, not because of any antipathy toward to schedule. I'm very pro people making the right decision for their kids. When my oldest (now 10) was a baby, I remember a good friend absolutely agonising over the MMR. She actually did have an older kid who developed autism, seemingly just after the shot. She was 90% sure that it was a huge co-incidence but back then the MMR was news. It was a heartbreaking level of doubt. OTOH, we both moved in very low vax circles, and I've always reasoned that if you react to the MMR, logically you are likely to have a stronger reaction to live measles (I don't think there's any evidence for this, btw, but I'd take that as evidence of the MMRs safety). FWIW I was happy that by having my kids vaxed, the onus was a little less on her to get it done because I can see how that would be be a truly agonising decision (although ultimately she went for the jab-and her daughter was fine). I think there are good reasons beyond pure medical indicators for not contributing to herd immunity. At the end of the day though not wanting your child to take the minuscule risk inherent in any vaccine, yet letting them benefit from herd immunity, seems a bit selfish to those who genuinely can't have the vaccine. I'd rather my kids went through five seconds of pain and the tiny, tiny, tiny risk of adverse effects to improve the prognosis of another child who was immunocompromised as a result of chemotherapy, say. 

 

Actually my kids have had extra vaccines. The older two just missed out on the meningitis one and I had them done privately, because I think meningitis really is scary in this age group. I've had it myself-measles complications as a kid. It always makes me laugh when people say its only kids with poor diets that get complications, btw. My parents ran a whole food shop!

 

Oh and my kids are never ill either! I've never understood the idea that vaccines weaken the immune system. I mean I just don't get the logic. We introduce far, far worse toxins than anything in vaccines to our bodies quite routinely, say because we like to drive around in a car.

teacozy likes this.

Raising Geek_Generation_2.0 :LET ds= 10 ; LET dd1= ds - 2; LET dd2=dd-2; IF month=0.67 THEN LET ds = ds+1; 
Fillyjonk is offline  
#16 of 61 Old 09-18-2013, 09:39 AM
 
chickabiddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,483
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MichelleZB View Post
 

 

So, why are you torn? What are the points against the HPV shot? Is it just too expensive?

 

I'm pretty sure it's covered by my insurance, but even if not, cost is not a factor.

 

First is that it's too new to have a long-term safety record I feel completely comfortable with.  Second is that at age 11, I don't think she needs it yet.  But I know she needs it before she *needs* it, ikywim, and that's why I'm torn.


Carseat-checking (CPST) and WAH mama to a twelve-year-old girl.
chickabiddy is online now  
#17 of 61 Old 09-18-2013, 10:22 AM
 
cwill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I don't know much about HPV as it is fairly new and it won't be on my vaccination radar for another 9 years.  It's been approved and in use for 7 years, is that right?  And in development for like 30 some?  How long a track record would make you comfortable?  (This is something I've been thinking about lately with the recent TDaP-for-every-pregnancy recommendation.)

 

Are there specific aspects about this vaccine that are different from others that give you pause?  Just the virus itself?  Or the reports of adverse effects?

cwill is offline  
#18 of 61 Old 09-18-2013, 10:54 AM
 
Katie8681's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Northern Cali
Posts: 676
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)

As a midwife I see the consequences of HPV allll the time, and this is actually one of the vaccines I'm most eager to give my kid. I have a son but 1)it's good to decrease the number of HPV+ people out there and 2)it's not just cervical cancer HPV causes but throat, anal, penile, and probably others as well. I want to know how long protection lasts but if it gets people through the years when they are more likely to have multiple partners, even if serially monogamous, then I'll be happy. I plan to start the series when he's 11.

teacozy likes this.

At home amongst the redwoods treehugger.gif with my husband and my son, born 7/5/11 familybed1.gif  Instant CNM, just add caffix.gif !

Katie8681 is offline  
#19 of 61 Old 09-18-2013, 11:53 AM - Thread Starter
 
MichelleZB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickabiddy View Post
 

 

I'm pretty sure it's covered by my insurance, but even if not, cost is not a factor.

 

First is that it's too new to have a long-term safety record I feel completely comfortable with.  Second is that at age 11, I don't think she needs it yet.  But I know she needs it before she *needs* it, ikywim, and that's why I'm torn.

 

It's been approved and in use now for about 6 years, right? How long should a vaccine be in use before you are comfortable with it? Of course, before it was approved, it went through clinical trials for safety.

 

Of course, this isn't an entirely "new" drug. It's a vaccine. Same mechanism as all the other vaccines, different virus. It works like every vaccine: you're exposed to a mild form of the virus, and then your body fights it, forming antibodies that will be able to attack a stronger version should you ever be exposed again. So... I guess I want to know what kind of adverse effects this particular vaccine would have that other vaccines wouldn't. Is there another reason to be concerned about this one, but not about all the other vaccines your daughter has had? If she has been fine with most of her other shots, what would make this one different?

 

Did you have similar doubts about other newer vaccines, like chickenpox or rotovirus? Or did you do those?

teacozy likes this.
MichelleZB is offline  
#20 of 61 Old 09-18-2013, 12:14 PM
 
chickabiddy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 3,483
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)

Rotavirus was not yet introduced when my daughter was born in 2002, so we did not do it.  I had similar concerns about varicella but eventually decided it was worth it.  I'll probably decide in the end that HPV is worth it as well.  My main concern is that it still feels new to me.

 

Can I say how happy I am to be able to discuss this with other people whose default is to vax, instead of the opposite?


Carseat-checking (CPST) and WAH mama to a twelve-year-old girl.
chickabiddy is online now  
#21 of 61 Old 09-18-2013, 01:07 PM
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I feel kind of the same way about Gardasil tbh. I am glad my girl is still so young and there will be more data available by the time she is old enough. Varicella vax has been out for almost 20 years now so I feel a lot better about that one. (I remember exactly when it came out, because I had just been exposed to chicken pox when we found out about it... fun.)

erigeron is offline  
#22 of 61 Old 09-18-2013, 01:33 PM
 
cwill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 560
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie8681 View Post
 

As a midwife I see the consequences of HPV allll the time, and this is actually one of the vaccines I'm most eager to give my kid. I have a son but 1)it's good to decrease the number of HPV+ people out there and 2)it's not just cervical cancer HPV causes but throat, anal, penile, and probably others as well. I want to know how long protection lasts but if it gets people through the years when they are more likely to have multiple partners, even if serially monogamous, then I'll be happy. I plan to start the series when he's 11.

 

I'm excited too, to be able to give it to my son; but like erigeron, I'm also glad it will have a longer track record by the time he gets it.

 

From what I've seen so far however, it seems on par with the safety of other vaccines.

cwill is offline  
#23 of 61 Old 09-18-2013, 07:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
MichelleZB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by chickabiddy View Post
 

Rotavirus was not yet introduced when my daughter was born in 2002, so we did not do it.  I had similar concerns about varicella but eventually decided it was worth it.  I'll probably decide in the end that HPV is worth it as well.  My main concern is that it still feels new to me.

 

Can I say how happy I am to be able to discuss this with other people whose default is to vax, instead of the opposite?

 

Yay!!!!! Feeling the love here at Vaccinating on Schedule!!!

 
Being concerned about something new can be an emotional reaction. I have the opposite emotional reaction: I will rush with enthusiasm at anything new, and I have to remind myself to calm down and think things through!
Fillyjonk likes this.
MichelleZB is offline  
#24 of 61 Old 09-19-2013, 10:49 AM
 
Fillyjonk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 825
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)

I'm interested that several of you are planning to give the HPV to your sons. Could you tell me a bit more about this? I'm in the UK where its routine for girls but not for boys. I'm assuming we'd have to pay privately for it, but that's ok-I assume it is available privately. Could anyone tell me a bit more about the reason for giving it to boys? And I assume it is at the same age-here 14 seems to be the default?


Raising Geek_Generation_2.0 :LET ds= 10 ; LET dd1= ds - 2; LET dd2=dd-2; IF month=0.67 THEN LET ds = ds+1; 
Fillyjonk is offline  
#25 of 61 Old 09-19-2013, 11:40 AM - Thread Starter
 
MichelleZB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)

I'd love to! It is something I looked into.

 

The reason why they give it to girls is because HPV can cause cervical warts that can develop into cancer. There are two reasons why to give it to young boys:

 

1) It's a herd immunity issue. The reason why we all want to avoid rubella, for instance, is because rubella can be really dangerous for fetuses. That means the people who have to avoid getting rubella are women. In Canada and Britain, they used to give the rubella vaccine to women only for that reason. But doing it that way failed spectacularly. To protect individual people from a disease, you need to reduce its prevalence in a population, and that means routine vaccination of everyone. Once we switched to giving rubella to all infants, it started to make a difference. It will work the same for HPV. Everyone needs to get it to prevent its spread--that's how vaccines work.

 

2) It affects men, too. Men can get HPV warts on their throats, causing cancer. We don't like to discuss about how HPV can be transmitted through oral sex (both on women and men). This is something your son needs protection from as much as your daughter. Here's Dan Savage talking about that. Why did I link to him? Because of the love.

MichelleZB is offline  
#26 of 61 Old 09-19-2013, 08:10 PM
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Gay/bisexual men can also get anal cancer from HPV. 

 

One aspect I like of vaccinating both sexes is more philosophical. Vaccinating only girls makes it out like HPV is a women's problem and men don't need to worry about it. If it is recommended for everyone, that means everyone is being made aware of the disease and how it is spread and their role in it. I would want my son (if I should have one) to grow up to take responsibility for his own sexual health and that of any partner(s) he may have, rather than thinking "Oh, dealing with x isn't my job." It's similar to men being taught to wear condoms rather than assume birth control is a woman's problem.

MichelleZB and pudlenka like this.
erigeron is offline  
#27 of 61 Old 09-19-2013, 08:22 PM
 
cardigan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Posts: 321
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've got a 2.5w old baby boy who will be fully vaccinated (HPV when old enough).
prosciencemum likes this.
cardigan is offline  
#28 of 61 Old 09-19-2013, 08:26 PM - Thread Starter
 
MichelleZB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Ontario, Canada
Posts: 1,001
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 20 Post(s)
Woah, a new little guy!! Welcome!
MichelleZB is offline  
#29 of 61 Old 09-20-2013, 12:18 AM
 
Fillyjonk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 825
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)

thanks both, that makes sense actually. I've never really looked into HPV and in the UK afaik only girls are offered the vaccine so that helps a lot. You are both absolutely right about the transmission vector thing, I'd never thought of it in those terms. And I know from personal experience that it can be an issue in the LGBT community also, and I make no assumptions about what my kids might or might not choose or prefer in their sexual futures. Its a vaccine that's hardly impacted on my radar because its a vaccine that is routinely given in school in the UK and my kids are homeschooled. The vaccine has a fairly low profile as a result though many of my friends have opted out for their girls. OTOH I do accept that the NHS can be quite awful if you want information about things, it can look like a cover up is going on when what's really happening (IMHO) is high volume of patients and high confidence in the vaccine, and it being quite unusual to refuse. My perception is that selective or deliberately delayed vaccination is fairly rare here-I think there are other UK posters on here and I'd be interested in that perspective?

 

Does anyone know what the recommended age is for the vaccine for boys? Round here, girls its 14.


Raising Geek_Generation_2.0 :LET ds= 10 ; LET dd1= ds - 2; LET dd2=dd-2; IF month=0.67 THEN LET ds = ds+1; 
Fillyjonk is offline  
#30 of 61 Old 09-21-2013, 08:52 PM
 
prosciencemum's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 1,729
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 79 Post(s)

There is some discussion of expanding the vaccine to boys in the UK: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-24142695


Mother of two living in UK. Daughter (2007) born in USA, son (2010) born here. I'm pro natural birth, midwife care, breastfeeding, co-sleeping, baby wearing and a keen advocate of cloth diapering. I'm a full time working research scientist (physical sciences) and I'm pro-vaccine.

prosciencemum is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off