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Old 08-13-2014, 09:45 PM
 
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I heard that coconut oil used on the bum won't ruin cloth diapers...anyone know this for sure? Does it wash out? I use a belly butter made from coconut oil (as well as some other hard and soft oils) and it has ruined 2 sets of sheets and multiple shirts.
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Old 08-15-2014, 05:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by CorinneVT View Post
I heard that coconut oil used on the bum won't ruin cloth diapers...anyone know this for sure? Does it wash out? I use a belly butter made from coconut oil (as well as some other hard and soft oils) and it has ruined 2 sets of sheets and multiple shirts.
Corinne, I never had coconut or any other oil "ruin" a purely cloth diaper...synthetics, yes, you can't ever seem to get all the oils out and they start repelling water, but pure cotton, it may take effort, but it can be stripped out if necessary. The oils may harm your diaper covers though, if you use PUL-lined ones.

But a cautionary note about coconut oil: there are a lot more food allergies and sensitivities these days than there ever used to be, and using coconut oil on his skin was how I first knew for sure that my 2nd son (still a nursing baby at the time) was allergic to coconut: I used it to loosen cradle cap on his scalp in lieu of the "baby oil" they used to recommend, and it worked great on the cradle cap, but then he broke out. I had suspected coconut oil because I used it in cooking, but hadn't isolated it sufficiently yet as a variable, to be absolutely sure.

Anyone allergic to nuts, can be alleric to coconut, as it is, in fact, a tree nut. A large one, but a tree nut nonetheless.
My daughter, never allergic to it all these years before, is now reactive to coconut, and that started at going on 10 years old. But oddly enough she can still have almonds. But I don't dare use the "natural" sunscreens on her (or my boys) because they all contain coconut oil or something else my kids are allergic to.

The best thing for diaper rash I have seen, that doesn't harm any cloth or synthetic diapers, that is amazingly effective at keeping skin dry and breathable to heal rashes of all sorts including diaper rash and my own heat rash, is the Disana pure raw silk diaper liners, made in Germany, specifically for the purpose of healing diaper rash. They are about $21 for a 3-pack through Green Mountain Diapers, and I gave them a try, and would recommend them as an alternative to creams, oils, lotions, powders, and goop of all kinds. I even tried French Green Clay for my heat rash, and it didn't work the way these did.

So there is a way to heal and soothe bottom rashes without creams or oils or lanolin or any of that, at least. They do require hand washing and air drying, but I haven't found it any hassle at all compared to smearing on goop and then worrying about it harming diapers or making my laundry difficult. Hope that helps!

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Old 08-15-2014, 05:56 AM
 
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Originally Posted by fruitfulmomma View Post
We have used them with several babies and never had an issue. Wash them real well and leave them out in the hot sun to dry at least one and you should be good. You could also add a bit a tea tree oil to the wash.
Just watch out for having to strip them repeatedly, because sometimes other people use scented detergents, or worse, fabric softeners, and anything synthetic like fleece liners, is ruined forever if it ever comes in contact with fabric softener or oils...I ruined a microfleece/hemp diaper liner, brand new, by washing it with my organic unbleached cotton flat birdseye diapers, because I was still washing them over and over to remove residual natural "cotton wax" that bleaching removes, but it otherwise present in the tan-colored unbleached ones. The cotton wax must have fused with the microfleece stay-dry side of the diaper liner/doubler, and after that, it repelled water no matter what. Groan.

As for tea tree oil, a lot of people wishing to avoid antibacterial ingredients found in antibacterial soaps and such, think of tea tree oil as the answer. There is a little problem with this. Anything at all that kills bacteria, whether it's a synthesized compound or something naturally occurring, must be used at full lethal potency in order to kill ALL bacteria present, or else the risk of the bacteria becoming resistant, is a problem. The problem of bacterial resistance is there whether you are using Triclosan or Tea Tree Oil...if you use it in low doses in almost everything, it's going to give rise to resistant bacteria, because any and all survivors of the sublethal concentrations commonly used in dish and hand soap, laundry, etc, are hardy to it and their offspring will be, too.

So: the advice is, if you are going to use anything antibacterial, tea tree oil included, use it only in situations where you need to fully disinfect, and then be sure to use it in fully lethal concentrations and leave it on for long enough. The little dashes here and there of tea tree oil in everything, are just as likely to create bacterial resistance, as little dashes of other antibacterial agents in everything.

That's why I don't use it around the house as a "little dash of insurance"...because it poses exactly the same problems as antibacterial-everything for causing resistant strains of bacteria to develop. And I would caution anyone with allergies in their family, about using pure or essential oils of anything, in their laundry...natural or not doesn't matter to allergic sensitization.

Hope I don't sound like a wet blanket. I just know a LOT of casual, low-level use of things like lavender and tea tree oil goes on in the holistic-health community, and most have no idea there are potential problems with it.

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Old 08-27-2014, 07:54 PM
 
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Originally Posted by goingonfour View Post
Corinne, I never had coconut or any other oil "ruin" a purely cloth diaper...synthetics, yes, you can't ever seem to get all the oils out and they start repelling water, but pure cotton, it may take effort, but it can be stripped out if necessary. The oils may harm your diaper covers though, if you use PUL-lined ones.

But a cautionary note about coconut oil: there are a lot more food allergies and sensitivities these days than there ever used to be, and using coconut oil on his skin was how I first knew for sure that my 2nd son (still a nursing baby at the time) was allergic to coconut: I used it to loosen cradle cap on his scalp in lieu of the "baby oil" they used to recommend, and it worked great on the cradle cap, but then he broke out. I had suspected coconut oil because I used it in cooking, but hadn't isolated it sufficiently yet as a variable, to be absolutely sure.

Anyone allergic to nuts, can be alleric to coconut, as it is, in fact, a tree nut. A large one, but a tree nut nonetheless.
My daughter, never allergic to it all these years before, is now reactive to coconut, and that started at going on 10 years old. But oddly enough she can still have almonds. But I don't dare use the "natural" sunscreens on her (or my boys) because they all contain coconut oil or something else my kids are allergic to.

The best thing for diaper rash I have seen, that doesn't harm any cloth or synthetic diapers, that is amazingly effective at keeping skin dry and breathable to heal rashes of all sorts including diaper rash and my own heat rash, is the Disana pure raw silk diaper liners, made in Germany, specifically for the purpose of healing diaper rash. They are about $21 for a 3-pack through Green Mountain Diapers, and I gave them a try, and would recommend them as an alternative to creams, oils, lotions, powders, and goop of all kinds. I even tried French Green Clay for my heat rash, and it didn't work the way these did.

So there is a way to heal and soothe bottom rashes without creams or oils or lanolin or any of that, at least. They do require hand washing and air drying, but I haven't found it any hassle at all compared to smearing on goop and then worrying about it harming diapers or making my laundry difficult. Hope that helps!
Thank you Goingonfour. I'm hoping not to have to use anything, but I will be careful. Also hoping to do diaper-free/EC as much as possible so hopefully that will prevent a lot of rash problems.
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Old 08-28-2014, 05:17 PM
 
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Hi everyone, bit late to the convo but I'm planning on using MCN's (Modern Cloth Nappies - I'm Australian and we don't call then diapers) too. I'm due to have my first child soon (EDD: 8 Sep... Eep!), and I did a LOT of research on the topic before committing. Apart from my husband and one friend, I don't have much support for it, but I'm hoping that by being well-prepared, I can be successful *fingers crossed*. At a 'baby expo' here I purchased a full-time set of Cushie Tushies Chameleons. They're a one-size option with lots of flexibility and they look and feel amazing. Assuming my baby is as sensitive as me, I think cloth is the best option for them. I didn't handle it when I was little, but I think it was the bleach you used to have to soak them in (I am so glad we've come a long way since then!). I've also purchased some flushable liners (a good option apparently for when you use rash cream as it protects the nappy) and bio-degradable inserts for easy changing when away/with someone who doesn't understand cloth. I also love the handy YouTube clips they have and great customer service (a local rep visited us in our home to explain everything again and even brought her own 'live model' lol!). Detergent-wise, they have their own which is great (natural and easy!) and our Aussie sun can kill any nasties dead at 15 paces lol! There is no better bleaching agent (and it's cheaper than a dryer, though we have one for wet days). I've even bought their wipes solution and cloth wipes (I've gone all-in!). I'm really hoping we can stick to this as I think it looks/feels better for bubs, is kinder to the environment and saves money (plus I want to prove everyone wrong who sarcastically says, "good luck with that!"). I hope to upload a pic of my stash, but tech doesn't always work fee me lol. Cheers, Ash.
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Old 08-28-2014, 08:52 PM
 
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Has anyone used Tushie Ties style prefolds? I was thinking of adding button holes and a ribbon to the prefolds that I bought instead of using Snappis or pins.
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