Talk to me about C-Sections... - Page 3 - Mothering Forums

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#61 of 104 Old 04-15-2005, 10:04 AM
 
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You know, nothing was said about rupture rate with the use of inducing agents, we were talking about the rupture rate period, which is still out on one laywer vs two. I know plenty of OBs and three midwived in redneck AL that will attend you no matter how you are sutured.
Also, my "research" about subsequent csections and recovery time was not based on my personal experience. I wasn't comparing csections to vaginal birth recoveries but subsequent, elective csection ones. Also, just so you know, most good surgeons REMOVE the old scar tissue and adhesions from the previous cesarean.
The OP asked for SUPPORT to make her exeprience better. It doesnt seem she wants to risk having a vaginal birth and have a colostomy the rest of her life. Instead scare tactics have been used and really off the mark comments have been made about planned cesarean sections (which are pretty darn safe).
The last I checked, Mothering wasnt meant to be used to harass or belittle other folks choices. This woman has a need, a valid medical reason for a cesarean section -- as do many of us here. Keep that in mind when you post, some of us may not be willing to take some risks like you are all for the sake of natural family living or to have a vaginal birth, maybe our lives, children lives, or our bodies rank above an ideal.

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#62 of 104 Old 04-15-2005, 10:35 AM
 
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I also had an emergency c-section with DS due to some complications... thankfully we both turned out fine and in retrospect it was the right call for us. Kudos to my MWs and doula for recognizing it was time to change strategy.

I had preeclampsia so I was a mess regardless... but I think the section was hard for me because I went through three hours of pushing before we had to stop. I felt that I had failed somehow as a mom and while now I know that it absolutely not true I had in my head this image of an ideal, natural childbirth and that was not what I had. So I would encourage you to picture yourself having the section, hearing the baby's cry, holding your husband's hand, nursing your child in recovery..... and I think you will be more content with your birth than I initially was.

Definately stay on top of your pain meds, get moving as soon as you can (and get that shower!), ask a ton of questions, and stay in the hospital for your full stay. I had a nurse I disliked, and was getting itchy to come home when one day some doc (probably just a resident or intern) stopped in, checked my chart, and said, hey, you look pretty good, ready to go home? I said, I think so - next thing I know we're getting discharged. Long story short, we wound up back in the ER two days later because my BP was through the roof.

I had a visiting nurse come after I was home because of my preeclampsia, which was fantastic. She asked me how I was doing with the pain and I told her that I still had a lot of discomfort. Well, she got on the phone to my doc and told them to refill my percoset. Lesson learned! No need to be in pain, take the meds they give you --

GL!
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#63 of 104 Old 04-15-2005, 08:28 PM
 
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Originally Posted by OnTheFence
The last I checked, Mothering wasnt meant to be used to harass or belittle other folks choices. This woman has a need, a valid medical reason for a cesarean section -- as do many of us here. Keep that in mind when you post, some of us may not be willing to take some risks like you are all for the sake of natural family living or to have a vaginal birth, maybe our lives, children lives, or our bodies rank above an ideal.

Kim
Kim, there wasn't any belittlement or harassment going on. Stafl and I have both been through c-sections, we hardly need to recall certain issues when we post when we have been through them ourselves.

I believe we both recommended seeking other opinions from the medical community, not an arbitrary homebirth as you seem to think. I also provided the ICAN link which has more information.

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#64 of 104 Old 04-15-2005, 11:16 PM
 
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The OP asked for SUPPORT to make her exeprience better. It doesnt seem she wants to risk having a vaginal birth and have a colostomy the rest of her life. Instead scare tactics have been used and really off the mark comments have been made about planned cesarean sections (which are pretty darn safe).

Kim
Kim,
The title of the thread is "talk to me about c-sections..." and I think the moms who went thru them were doing just that. We were being HONEST, not using "scare tactics." I didn't get into how my epi wore off and I felt the surgery. I didn't get into how at the exact moment my daughter was born, I was dry heaving into a plastic recepticle from the meds. The fact is, cesareans can be vey rough for some women.

When someone asks what it is truly like to have a surgical birth, it doesn't help to gloss thing over. I don't think that's what the OP was asking for. We kept it real, mama. Surgery is hard on your body, no matter how you look at it.

April is Cesarean Awareness month. Raising awareness about the experience of surgical birth is paramount, no matter what kind of birth someone ultimately has.
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#65 of 104 Old 04-16-2005, 01:41 AM
 
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mamabugx3 - If you are still with us, How long ago was your reconstructive surgery? If it's been over a year, I don't see how that puts you at risk if you go into labor or have a vaginal delivery. You should be totally healed by now. Are you just taking one doctor's word for it that you must have a cesarean or have you sought a second opinion from a doctor or midwife in a different practice? Have you spoken with your surgeon about it? Have you read your medical records?

If you do have to have a cesarean, it's not the end of the world, but it isn't the glorious wonderful birth some women on this thread are portraying. Being a planned cesarean means that you have the control, the power to decide how you want it to go that many of us did not have with our surgical births. I didn't mean to scare you with my experiences, you asked for them so I gave it to you straight, and I actually left out the worst of it. I just want to make sure that you have done the research and have all the facts before making your decision. Your health care, especially during pregnancy, should be in your hands. You get to call all the shots. If you aren't fully informed you can't make an informed decision. Never take one doctor's word for anything. Always seek a second opinion. Most insurance companies pay 100% for 2nd opinions, but sometimes you have to call them and get it approved first. I'm terribly sorry we took this thread so far off topic. Best of luck to you.
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#66 of 104 Old 04-16-2005, 04:40 AM
 
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mamabug, after reading more about your special circumstances I had some questions. Is your Dr recommending more corrective surgery AFTER this child is born? Do you intend for this to be your last child? Is your Dr talking about hysterectomy?

Well, IMO the less surgery the better. Is it possible, if they do perform a cesearan that they do any other procedure you choose at the same time? How long does that take? If it takes awhile perhaps you would like to have surgery later so you can bond with child. Would Dr recommend that? If they do perform more procedures rather than just a c-section at once, will that require general anesthia?

What are the chances of a repeat prolapse??

I dunno...I think you need to do a lot of research and have a long list of questions for your Dr.

I think a vaginal birth is possible but I think, if I were in your shoes, I would prefer to be in a hospital if you decide to try that route.

Most OBs will say c-section following any vaginal repair surgery, as they are concerned that labor and birth will damage the repairs. If you would like to have a vaginal birth, given your circumstances, I would recommend you contact ICAN and see if they have info they can give you.



I didn't speak much about my c-section because it was an emergency and I was in shock, since you are in a different situation, it is HIGHLY unlikely your experience would be similar.

It is standard to be given morphine after a c-section. I would say no to the morphine. It is bad. I disagree about the staples. I had staples and my scar is practically invisible. I think that may be more of a natural healing and skill of surgeon thing. I tend to heal up pretty well as far as that sort of thing goes.

I *do* have an autoimmune disease which I was not aware of at the time and it is plausible that could have affected my recovery.

The main thing I recommend is if you have stairs in your house that you may not do housework or laundry while healing (yes, 6-8 weeks) trying to be too active following major surgery will cause prolonged bleeding.

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#67 of 104 Old 04-16-2005, 12:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by stafl

If you do have to have a cesarean, it's not the end of the world, but it isn't the glorious wonderful birth some women on this thread are portraying.
Excuse me, but I know several women who would take considerable offense at this remark. Their births *were* glorious, and it is inappropriate to gauge everyone's cesarean experience by one's own. Someone who feels safer having a cesarean should have a cesarean; any reason a woman wants any kind of birth is a valid reason. No woman should have to make excuses for the choices she makes in her reproductive care and birth experience. It's one thing to say "My csection was pretty awful and if you can avoid it I think you should," and quite another to say that anything other than an "emergency" cesarean is unnecessary and not a good birth. There are plenty of women who have had traumatic, damaging vaginal births who, in retrospect, would have preferred to be anesthetized and operated on. There is more than one way to have a baby and become a mother. Invalidating someone's great experience because of the mode of delivery helps no one.

Another suggestion for the OP- if you have friends who can organize a Meal Wagon, bringing you dinners, I would suggest you ask them to start bringing them *after* your partner returns to work, if applicable. The first couple of weeks are often not as difficult as when the mother is left on her own, and her partner is then trying to manage work and coming home to more work. Friends of mine for whom we've done it this way have said it was better, and really took the edge off getting back into the swing of things.

If it is at all within your means get someone in to clean. A clean nest makes a happy mama hen. If you have friends who will do this for you, great, but you might find it less tiring when you are not in the mood for company to have hired help.

As far as the surgery being scary, handling that is different for different people. I would not necessarily be frightened because I am the kind of person for whom more knowledge is reassuring, so I would read the obstetrical textbooks and really get into the nitty-gritty. For some, having headphones on and some sedation, and knowing as little as possible would be the way to go. When you have figured out which style best suits you, prepare as much as possible.

If you can hire a doula and your OB will permit an extra support person in the OR this can be a big help. Most OBs will say it's up to the anesthesiologist, the anesthesiologist will then say it's up to the OB or the nurse, etc. If you are firm but nice they will accomodate you. Someone who has been to a few csections can really help talk you through it, and then when the baby is born, your partner is free to be with the baby during the exam, cleaning etc (some hospitals require the baby to go into the warmer, because birth is so rapid, and then to the nursery for observation until you are sewn up). Meanwhile you are not left alone during what for many is the most uncomfortable part of the surgery, because it takes about an hour to be sutured and fixed up and moved to the recovery room. A doula keeping you company and filled in on what's going on "behind the curtain" can help. A hospital might be more willing to let the doula stay for this part than a husband or other family member, in my experience.
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#68 of 104 Old 04-16-2005, 01:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by stafl

If you do have to have a cesarean, it's not the end of the world, but it isn't the glorious wonderful birth some women on this thread are portraying. Being a planned cesarean means that you have the control, the power to decide how you want it to go that many of us did not have with our surgical births. I didn't mean to scare you with my experiences, you asked for them so I gave it to you straight, and I actually left out the worst of it.
Excuse me, but my last cesarean was probably less painful and just as wonderful, with a faster recovery than a lot of the homebriths I read about on this forum. So yes, for some of us, and trust me there are thousands of women who have had glorious wonderful surgical births. Yes, I know some of you hate to read or hear that but YES, it is possible.

My first csection was a horrible, traumatic experience (I posted about it in the Csection support thread) but my last one was yes, glorious and wonderful. So I have had two experiences on the opposite end of the spectrum. I have to say that my last csection, the surgical portion was PAIN FREE. Yep, and I had an epidural. I did have tugging and pulling sensations, I could still move my legs, but I had no pain. I also had no other drugs, pre-op or during my surgery. This included zofran or phengran for that matter. I was completely alert and aware.
I went into the hospital at 10:30 in the morning, after I took a long shower, had my legs shaved, fixed my hair, and yes, put make up on -- which I rarely wear because I wanted to look good for the pictures. I figured I might as well feel good and look good too. I brought my birthplan and the plan for my baby. I talked to the nursery nurse and the anest before hand. The worst part was before I was ever cut -- the IV. I have small veins and it took two tries. This was something I was expecting though. The epidural was not as bad as I had expected. The worst part was the shot they gave me to numb the area they were going to do it in. Even though I was nervous, it wasn't that big of a deal (nothing compared to the spinal I had had five years earlier)
My csection from start to finish was 30 minutes long. It was a wonderful experience with two great OBs, understanding nurses, and with two very important support people, my husband and my sister. The OB who delivered him pulled him up over the sterile field and showed him to me and after he was briefly checked out, they wrapped him up and put him on my chest. My arms were not strapped down so I was able to hold and touch him. My husband then took him to the nursery to be weighed and measured -- which I was perfectly fine with. My baby was alert and was for more than two hours after my csection, his apgars were 8 and 9, I had him in recovery with me the ENTIRE TIME. We had skin to skin contact and I tried to latch him on but he really had no interest in nursing at all, he just wanted to look around.
I kept my epidural in until the next morning. I was able to easily sit up in bed with no pain and little discomfort, the biggest problem for me with the tape on the bandage because it tugged on my skin. My back itched from sweating in the bed (hormones) and that seems pretty minor to me. Once my baby decided to nurse (13hrs later) he nursed like a champ, and in the 48 hrs we were in the hospital lost only 2oz. Not bad if you ask me. As soon as my epidrual and cath were removed I immediately got a shower and used the bathroom. I started walking around the room that morning, with very little discomfort and then walking the halls that afternoon. I took pain meds, demoral, around the clock for the first day or so and then I rotated that with extra strength tylenol. Most of my nurses would forget that I even had a csection because I was up and around and having such little discomfort.
I had one bad nurse the entire time I was there, and she wasn't all that bad. I was given everything I wanted anytime I asked for it. I was in a pleasant and often jubilant mood my entire stay.
My toughest part of recovery was getting up and down out of the bed at home, so I slept in a recliner for several weeks. I was driving 8 days later, I was having sex a few weeks later. I was in better shape than many mother's I had been labor assistants for, so yep, I had a wonderful experience. I contribute a lot of that to planning, having a good support system and an OB that was willing to make the experience wonderful and making concessions for me. I plan a repeat performance in 8-9 weeks. Do I believe the OP can have a similar experience, absolutely.

Kim
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#69 of 104 Old 04-16-2005, 01:11 PM
 
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<<< There are plenty of women who have had traumatic, damaging vaginal births who, in retrospect, would have preferred to be anesthetized and operated on. There is more than one way to have a baby and become a mother. Invalidating someone's great experience because of the mode of delivery helps no one. >>>

This was my sister in law who had a fourth degree tear. She had a very traumatizing long and painful vaginal birth with her first child (28 years ago). When she got pregnant seven years later, she was devestated thinking she would have to have another vaginal birth. She actually went to a doctor who was willing to give her a csection and that is what she choose to do. She will tell anyone that her csection experience was much better than her natural vaginal delivery, with a quicker recovery. There are lots of women in mainstream parenting who feel similar and its not because they are uneducated morons, some of them are often very aware of risks and benefits of one vs the other.
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#70 of 104 Old 04-16-2005, 03:15 PM
 
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"If you do have to have a cesarean, it's not the end of the world, but it isn't the glorious wonderful birth some women on this thread are portraying."

Actually, LizD handled this comment perfectly, but I have to add that it can be as glorious as you want it to be. If you have a positive attitude and can work properly through all of your feelings it can be as wonderful of a birth as any other.

Some people have permanent damage to their bodies from vag deliveries and some of us have had their babies die in a homebirth. As a mom that has had such an extreme experience I refrain from sharing all the details with expecting moms because its a rare horrific thing and many homebirthers especially will only want to probe and figure out what mistakes were made. Sometimes the worst just happens. I hate the fact that I have to have babies surgically but I can cry about it or I can work on focusing on the positives.

I was a homebirther with my first 2 and it wasn`t about my perfect experience, it was about the most gentle beginning for my baby. My c/s was the only truly gentle beginning and it was beautiful for my baby. He didn`t cry at all during the hospital stay, he was treated so gently from the moment he was carefully placed on my legs and then in my arms after he was born. My milk came in at 24 hours because he was in bed with me suckling the whole time.

Those of you who had hellish c/s experiences, I`m not discounting your experience at all. I can`t understand because I haven`t been there, but I respect your feelings. I had a hellish vag delivery but I don`t push people to reconsider vag delivery at all, its still the most normal and safer most of the time. The OP is somebody who had 3 vag deliveries so I`m sure she knows what she wants now.

Married Catholic mami : to 5 boys, : 9 6 3 : 5 mo. 5/6/02-6/22/02 (HIE)
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#71 of 104 Old 04-16-2005, 03:25 PM
 
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I agree that when possible vaginal delivery is best...however that said I will answer your direct question with my own experience.

I had 4 vaginal births, then with my 5th baby had to have a C-section 2 months before I due date. I was TERRIFIED (I'd never had any type of surgery before).
Well to be totally honest...it was like a vacation!!

Don't get me wrong I would choose vaginal if given a choice, but we're talking no pain, totally awake and yakking away while your babe is being delivered. The worst part of the whole process was the epidural...and that wasn't too bad, I'd just never had one of those before either.

The recovery IMO is nothing like the horror stories you hear. (I am sure however some that had complications etc probably do have a rough time) My experience was this: For 3 days I was quite sore, not in pain, but sore. I went home on day 3 and dh went back to work on day 5 and I was off pain meds totally by then, doing cooking and everything else. It really wasn't a big deal at all. I'd not be scared again if I needed one...

So it can be 'easy' too! Keep your chin up.
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#72 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 12:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by OnTheFence
The OP asked for SUPPORT to make her exeprience better. It doesnt seem she wants to risk having a vaginal birth and have a colostomy the rest of her life.
OK - time out for a little medical reality here. There seems to be a lot of confusion about what the OP was talking about. She did NOT have a 'fourth degree to the rectum repaired" or anything like that. The OP had a rectocele corrected. A rectocele is a prolapse of the rectum (much like a cystocele, which is a prolapse of the bladder). Imagine something like a hernia where there is a bulging from the rectum into the vagina. The OP is NOT (repeat) NOT going to 'wind up with a colostomy' for the rest of her life should she choose to have a vaginal delivery. With vaginal delivery she might, however, wreck the reconstruction that has been done and as she had mentioned the correction was quite painful and took a long time to heal. Since the OP doesn't seem to be here to address the issue, thought I would put out that clarification.
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#73 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 12:36 AM
 
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I haven't read any of the replies yet...but I wanted to give you my experience...

I had an "emergency" c-section with Willow. I have been told that it was unnecessary. I'm still coming to terms with it.

That being said......It went very well, I healed quickly...and Willow's healthy, I'm healthy...it's all good. I was sore for the first week and a bit swollen...but the swelling goes down and everything heals. As much as I'm all for natural vaginal births and as hippie Earth mama as I am...I know that if I *HAD* to have another c-section...I know I could. It was scary for me because it was so sudden. It'll be scary for you because of your previous surgery...but you can absolutely do this.

One of the things recommended to me was to take liquid chlorophyll drops...it's so close chemically to the makeup of blood that it helps build up red blood cells...(also a good idea <IMO> if you're having a vaginal birth)...anyway...off of my soapbox...

At any rate, here's to a happy healthy c-section!! May you heal as quickly as I did.

You'll do great!

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#74 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 06:06 AM
 
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Someone who feels safer having a cesarean should have a cesarean; any reason a woman wants any kind of birth is a valid reason.
I completely disagree. You should *never* be given an *option* for MAJOR surgery over a vaginal birth. I do not consider that ethical. It is a waste of resources and also contributes to rising insurance costs, not only for initial surgery but also any follow-up surgeries that may be required due to adhesions. Unless people are willing to pay for them outright I don't think you should even be given the option without medical need.

Not a single person here said that a c-section was not a good birth. No one said that.

Do I think the OP has a medical need? yeah, she probably does, she may also need more surgery anyways and may be able to get a few things done at once...er..maybe.

This thread is about the OP who has already *three* vaginal births and could likely have another, people were recommending she find more info. That is perfectly within reason and logical. Not a single person said all c-sections were awful. We were discussing our *own* experiences as in we have been through it.

For instance, the nausea medicine made me vomit so I actually wouldn't recommend the nausea meds, am I wrong? No, it made me vomit so I know that is possible. It is used to treat nausea but obviously it didn't work so well for me. Meds never work for me, I always have some bizarro reaction. I was perscribed zoloft for my IC and it made me hallucinate and kind of crazy. Would I recommend zoloft? No, but it doesn't mean my experience despite being weird, should be dismissed. The epidural didn't take fast enough and they injected pain meds right into my abdomen. That worked quite well actually..*L I would recommend the pain meds right into your abdomen if the epi or spinal doesn't work. Some people may find that crazy but I had already been in labor awhile by then and wasn't really worried about needles.

No one said Homebirths were always fantastic, by three vaginal births (one a nightmare that resulted in reconstructive sugery) I think the OP knows that!

Also no one said the OP could definately have a vaginal birth, no one could say such a thing with much confidence, without being her physican and most people just recommended another opinion, not arbitrary vaginal birth despite Drs warnings.

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#75 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 10:17 AM
 
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<<<I completely disagree. You should *never* be given an *option* for MAJOR surgery over a vaginal birth. I do not consider that ethical. It is a waste of resources and also contributes to rising insurance costs, not only for initial surgery but also any follow-up surgeries that may be required due to adhesions. Unless people are willing to pay for them outright I don't think you should even be given the option without medical need.>>>

I guess thankfully we live in a society of choice. Since I am prochoice and all I think how I give birth, whether that be in my living room squatting on the floor or in a OR is my business, and no one should dictate how and when that should happen. I am very supportive of midwives, homebirth, and natural birth AND yes cesarean sections (even elective ones for no medical reason) because its about women and their bodies. What ones medical need maybe, another may not have a medical need. I am not a big proponent of breech vaginal deliveries for first time mothers, but if you want to take that risk, go for it. I had a doctor more than willing to do it with my daughter and I thought she was NUTS. I've had more than a few people tell me with my deformed uterus that I could have a vaginal delivery -- uh huh -- well I am sure glad they are not my doctors, because frankly I am not willing to risk my uterus rupturing or compromise my babies life for a vaginal birth. Some women for whatever reason don't want to labor for hours or experience natural childbirth and that is their perogative. It doesnt make them less mothers because they didn't push a baby out of their vagina. And it also doesnt mean they cant be part of the natural family community. So what you think is "ethical" is subjective in the real world. I am personally for choice, to me that is where my ethics lie. If women who want to have the choice be able to homebirth freely they need to realize they need to support the choice of the woman who chooses not too.

Kim
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#76 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 01:45 PM
 
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I am very supportive of midwives, homebirth, and natural birth AND yes cesarean sections (even elective ones for no medical reason) because its about women and their bodies.
I guess the bigger question is 'if it is elective, should insurance be paying for it?'. Insurance isn't footing the bill for breast enlargement, tummy tucks, liposuction, etc. if they are elective procedures. So why is an elective (i.e. without medical reason) any different? To my mind, it is not.
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#77 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 02:57 PM
 
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I guess the bigger question is 'if it is elective, should insurance be paying for it?'. Insurance isn't footing the bill for breast enlargement, tummy tucks, liposuction, etc. if they are elective procedures. So why is an elective (i.e. without medical reason) any different? To my mind, it is not.
I think it should be covered because its part of the maternity coverage. Lots of elective surgeries are covered by insurance, tubals and vasectomies for instance. Should insurance stop covering them as well? And also it would depend on your insurance, my insurance covers liposuction and tummy tucks. If you have maternity coverage than it should cover whatever birth you desire (even at home) Last I checked I PAID for my insurance premiums, and they are by no means cheap.
If people want to get really picky about birth and the invasion of other people's standards on it, by all means lets do. I have a feeling its not those seeking csections that are going to suffer. Either one of us can argue why the other ones choices cause increased insurance premiums and more costs to the consumer. My SIL as I wrote in another post (maybe not this thread) was FORCED to VBAC because her BCBS insurance would not pay for an elective REPEAT csection. This was in 1995/96. Even though she did VBAC and is now glad she did (even tho she was induced with PIT and AROM) she still feels that her insurance company should not have forced her to do something she did not want to do.
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#78 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 03:16 PM
 
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I've had 2 CS's. The worst part for me was the epi. ugg, needle in the back! I passed out last time. The actual CS was fine, I fell asleep both times, they woke me up as they were born. Even though I was over 100lbs overweight, I was out of the hospital in 2 days, no pain at cs site.

The 2nd cs though, the doc had to remove alot of scar tissue from the first CS, I was in the room about 4 hours I think. she cleaned up all the scar tissue from the first cs, and then injected dye into my kidneys to make sure she didn't cut into it.

no nursing problems, no problems at all from cs. Just remind yourself you are giving birth, just a different way.
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#79 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 07:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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``Hey My surgery was done like one year ago exactly. I took along time to heal. My sugery site tore once and got a bit infected. Then I was always coming down with bladder infections. So, healing was slow and at times very, very painful. Btw- I don't want to come off as a mom who is looking forward to a c/section. I am a very natural mom who seldom even takes Tylenol. I have been cloth diapering for over 8 yrs now, breast feed, and we co-sleep. I also carry my babies. I had all three of my prior babies vaginally, and two were natural with no epi's. I had significant damage, and have made my peace with the fact that my body was broken twice, is still in the process of healing from its surgery. I haven't taken ANY offense to anyone's opinions or stories Actually, I find it educating to read these posts when I get the chance. I am getting a second opinion in a week and a half, so who knows? thank you all so much for being so diverse and informative

Mommy to five wonderful earthlings, and one on the way supporter Humble Wife and Mother Learning to live through Jesus!
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#80 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 08:10 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mom2six
OK - time out for a little medical reality here. There seems to be a lot of confusion about what the OP was talking about. She did NOT have a 'fourth degree to the rectum repaired" or anything like that. The OP had a rectocele corrected. A rectocele is a prolapse of the rectum (much like a cystocele, which is a prolapse of the bladder). Imagine something like a hernia where there is a bulging from the rectum into the vagina. The OP is NOT (repeat) NOT going to 'wind up with a colostomy' for the rest of her life should she choose to have a vaginal delivery. With vaginal delivery she might, however, wreck the reconstruction that has been done and as she had mentioned the correction was quite painful and took a long time to heal. Since the OP doesn't seem to be here to address the issue, thought I would put out that clarification.
\

I haven't been online, since my dh was stung Friday numerous times by aggressive bees and has not been feeling well. That said, I thought I did mention the tearing. In case I didn't, I had BAD tearing with my dd. I am not sure the exact 'degree', but basically my behind and all the inside of my vaginal area was repaired. This contributed to my rectocele and vaginal wall later prolapsing. I was unable to have bowel movements, sex, urinated without feeling, and had horrible back pain. My third pregnancy resulted in more tearing, and there I was in the O.R.six weeks postpartum having a surgery to correct that among other things. I never said I was going to have a colostomy bag if I delivered vaginally again. However, I can understand how this may happen to other women who have had severe rectal damage. Fwiw, two doctors have told me that this area will tear again. I am waiting on an appointment for another opinion. Not too many doctors around here unfortunately. : For anyone who has had ANY kind of rectal---and you know it hurts----vaginal or perineal repair, I symphatize with you. My pain humbled me in so many ways. It would hurt to belittle, what to a medical stand point may just basically be 'a hernia of the rectum' since it and the other factors left me crying and curled into a ball at times from the pain. Perhaps I should have listed more details of my surgery and the contributing factors, not that I thought that that was significant at the time. My apologies. My question was for information on the subject of C/Sections, since I now carry the risk of having one. I just wanted to have some kind of info on them, whether it was good or bad. This would not be an elective surgery, and I sometimes dream of having a tummy-tuck, since I now have a pooch that could hide my thighs :LOL Mom2Six, you were quite right in saying that it might wreck the surgery. Thank you for educating the others on what a rectocele is. Lots of young moms suffer from them, and unfortunately are too embarrassed to go see the doctor about them. I knew all of the things I was suffering from were not normal, and I refused to be in pain like that. If you feel you have one or a cystocele, PLEASE see your doctor for advice. I have to go tend to my dh. Thank you ladies.

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#81 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 08:50 PM
 
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I hope you didn't think I was saying that your c/sec would be elective! There seemed to be quite a lot of confusion about what we were talking about exactly. Some seemed to think that you were talking about previous tearing and repair and doc was recommending c/sec to prevent future severe tears and yet someone else offered that you were 'didn't want to risk having a colostomy for the rest of your life'. Just wanted to offer info on *what* it was that we were actually talking about.

FWIW - I've never had a c/sec, but work as an L&D nurse. The hospitals I have worked in have very high c/sec rates, so I have cared for many, many women that have had c/sec's. My experience in caring for women post-op seems to be that spinal with duramorph offers best pain relief, though I know there are those on the boards who vehemently disagree. I think I would talk to the anesthesia staff at the hospital and see what your options are first. This is only *my experience* with working in different hospitals with different anesthesia protocols, but the women with a spinal with duramorph seem to have the least pain (but can have annoying itching), epidural with demerol run through it seem to have decent pain control (but do seem to be in more pain than those that got duramorph) and those that get 'on-Q', a newer surgical pain control method that delivers medication to the incision site or those that get a "PCA" (pt. controlled IV medications) seem to have the poorest pain control. With good anesthesia care and adequate dosing of your pain meds (please do take them, even if you usually don't take a tylenol! There is good research to show that adequately controling pain early on leads to less pain later.) you should be able to have a relatively comfortable experience. Good luck with whatever choices you make for the best delivery of your baby!
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#82 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 10:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you Mom2Six Once, again your insight and advice is greatly appreciated. I know that after my surgery I started to come off of some pain med they had given me, and I was itchy and hallucinating. It was horrible. My best-friend said that I told her that I wanted to 'crawl out of my skin'. Funny now, but at the time she said I probably had a reaction or something. I will take that info you just gave down thanks

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#83 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 10:36 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheFence
I think it should be covered because its part of the maternity coverage. Lots of elective surgeries are covered by insurance, tubals and vasectomies for instance. Should insurance stop covering them as well? And also it would depend on your insurance, my insurance covers liposuction and tummy tucks. If you have maternity coverage than it should cover whatever birth you desire (even at home) Last I checked I PAID for my insurance premiums, and they are by no means cheap.
If people want to get really picky about birth and the invasion of other people's standards on it, by all means lets do. I have a feeling its not those seeking csections that are going to suffer. Either one of us can argue why the other ones choices cause increased insurance premiums and more costs to the consumer.
Um, I would like to see your argument on that because I do not buy for a single moment that vaginal births can possibly raise ins premiums more than elective c-sections. My c-section was $13,000.

Aside from costs I do not think it is *medically* ethical for someone to have an elective major surgery. Cosmetic surgery is not *major* surgery and a c-section is. Y'all are talking about tummy tucks or liposuction when it doesn't even compare. How about elective gallbladder removal when you don't actually need it or random open heart surgery? Sure if it is medically necessary but for no reason?

Not to mention that it takes up the time of the hospital staff when they could be doing something else. When I had my c-section there was the anestheologist, the surgeon, my Dr, two nurses and a couple of other people who I don't recall who they were but we got a bill for their attendance.

A quote by American College of Nurse-Midwives (ACNM) Director of Professional Services, Marion McCartney CNM, BSN, FACNM
Quote:
"Before women rush to sign up for an elective cesarean section, they should ask for evidence that cesarean birth is as safe as a normal vaginal birth and that future pregnancies and cesareans will be as safe as the first. We have no such evidence to date. Even worse, women are being promised unproven health benefits from this major surgical procedure." said McCartney.
From an article which appeared in Mothering.

Sure, some women do medically require a cesearan but I do not think it should be availible without medical need.

Regardless, the issue doesn't really have anything to do with the OP. Can we get the thread back on topic? She asked for information, which people were giving her. You are derailing the thread with an agenda which is opposed to the philosophies of the magazine this board represents.

Medically necessary c-sections are one thing but you cannot expect to argue in favor of elective c-sections for no reason at Mothering without being called on it.

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#84 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 10:43 PM
 
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mamabug, I am sorry to hear about your dh. I hope he is doing better.



Glad to see you back.

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#85 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 10:48 PM
 
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OTF, I don't get this: since elective cesareans are riskier for healthy moms and babies, I am wondering why exactly you are advocating that women should have that choice. Do you think it's ethical to let women subject their fetuses to stastically significantly higher risks because they want to plan a vacation around it? I'm for choice too, but when women put convienience above the welfare of their unborn babies, I think a line should be drawn.

You say ANY reson is legit. My mom had an elective c with my brother and he was accidentally born 4 weeks premature. He's had lasting implications. How is that fair for him? My mom was 'sick of being pregnant'. I'm sorry, but I think what my mom did was wrong, and I don't think she should have had the option to have her child born surgically for no reason other than being uncomfortable. It's pregnancy. It's uncomfortable. Now, her child's health will be forever effected. It isn't uncommon for elective c babies to be born early. It makes me sad that there are people actually *advocating* unnecessary surgical births. These babies need someone to advocate for them. Doctors are more than willing to do it, and women aren't being fully informed of the risks.

Flame me everyone if you want, but that's MHO.

ETA: both of my children were born surgically.
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#86 of 104 Old 04-17-2005, 10:50 PM
 
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I'd have to second the "spinal block" advice. No tubing taped up your back...nothing to be taken out later...that is of course if you have a choice in the matter...which I hope you do...Ok...back to lurking.

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#87 of 104 Old 04-18-2005, 12:38 AM
 
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Lucysmama - ITA

"The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie, deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive and unrealistic."
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#88 of 104 Old 04-18-2005, 01:57 AM
 
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You can have a wonderful cesarean birth if you plan it. I found a lot of information on the birthlove site for having a good cesarean birth experience.

I started planning when I was four or five months pregnant, and it took about two months to get everything set up. YMMV, of course, but our hospital was very resistant. Their policy still is that every baby born by cesarean is promptly removed from the OR and taken to the nursery for various procedures. No parents are permitted in the nursery, not even the daddy. Then, the baby meets the mother a few hours later in her room. So I had a long way to go.

Both of my babies had cesarean births. I learned a lot from the first baby's birth, so I prepared well in advance. Basically, I got the hospital and the OB and the neonatologist to commit to me in writing, months in advance, that the hospital would bend its usual procedures. I got a letter from the Director of Nurses and the Director of the Nursery at the hospital (they both signed it) that Rosie would remain in the room with me and would not be separated from me during any procedure. I also talked with the lactation consultants repeatedly before Rosie's birth to make sure they would be available when the cesarean was scheduled.

I will spare you a detailed recital of the mistakes of the first cesarean, which was not expected. The second cesarean was so wonderful compared to the first one that I will just point out some of the highlights:

1. I researched and found the OB with the best reputation for gentle cesarean births.

2. I worked with that OB to find the best anesthesiologist who never missed with spinal anesthesia. Unfortunately, he was horribly obnoxious and told football jokes during the birth, but I was warned in advance and handpicked him because the main thing was to avoid a spinal headache. This is really important. Get the best anesthesiologist, the one your doctor would pick if she ever needed spinal anesthesia, the one all the doctors pick. If you have ever had a spinal headache, you know why.

3. I hired a doula to be with me during the surgery. She had done several cesareans and she calls herself a "massage doula." She massaged me in the prep room before the surgery and stayed by my side in recovery and took care of all of those annoying things so my husband could just be with us.

4. I found out who the most supportive neonatologist would be, and I contacted him by phone to get him to agree to my requests: that Rosie would not be placed on a warmer and whisked to the nursery for shots, heel sticks, bath, weighing, etc. (where parents are not allowed); instead, she would be warmed in the OR on my husband's bare chest and then would come with me to the recovery room. I also had him agree to me nursing Rosie during any shots or heel sticks. I expected that Rosie would be extra large and that the staff would want to give her lots of heel sticks. Once he agreed, I made sure that the surgery would take place on his schedule and I sent the birth plan to him as well as the OB.

5. I put on my birth plan: I do not consent to me or my daughter being used to teach or train any personnel who are not fully certified in their chosen field. Students, residents, and interns may not observe me or my daughter for any reason and I specifically do not consent to any such observation. (My first daughter was born in a teaching hospital, and that was a nightmare.)

6. I had the LCs come visit early to work on any nursing issues. I expected that I might need to supplement with formula because of Rosie's size and because my first dd had been hypoglocemic. Therefore, I wanted to be ready for an SNS, etc.

Only one nurse griped about the birth plan. She told me that it was very inconvenient to have to do the weighing and heel sticks at bedside and that if every baby had that treatment that they would have to hire extra staff and that it was not fair to the other babies for my baby to get special treatment. She griped politely, but she made it clear that she thought I was a prima donna. Oh well! I brought my own soft purple sheets and pillows and chose my clothing so that it would be comfortable so I could avoid a hospital gown.

I wholeheartedly approve of the suggestion to avoid the iron. Just don't do it, or take a much smaller dose, or experiment in advance with forms of iron that work for you.

Also, my second OB gave me prophylactic antibiotics, while the first one did not. I think that made a difference in my fast recovery.

:-)
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#89 of 104 Old 04-18-2005, 02:12 AM
 
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Great Post inezyv!

Quote:
Originally Posted by inezyv
I wholeheartedly approve of the suggestion to avoid the iron. Just don't do it, or take a much smaller dose, or experiment in advance with forms of iron that work for you.
I agree but also Slow Fe is supposed to be gentler on the stomach as it is a slow release iron supplement. You should be able to get it OTC.


Anything and everything upsets my digestion but the SLow Fe kind might really work well for you. It is recommended as being gentler on the stomach than other Iron supplements.

Have you considered trying to cook with cast iron? that works well for some people.


Also, I would take any and all stool softeners they give you. *L

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#90 of 104 Old 04-20-2005, 12:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Good morning ladies I had a dream that I went into labor naturally, and that I was squatting...This was before I knew I was pg. Today, I had a dream that I was arguing with my doctor that I was going to go into labor early, and he wouldn't believe me. Seriously, I am under some stress here. Today, I have my U/S to see how far along I am. I was never one to really fear anything, but lately, my mind needs constant reassurance. I totally appreciate all of the info you all have given me. I feel like I have a lot of things to read up on now I decided not to see the doctor I was supposed to see, as he told me something very rude, and I now think he is a jerk. I can't see him being able to handle my body and be involved in such an intimate way and have this obnoxious attitude with me. So, because I have no real doctor now, I am going to have to drive 1 hr 1/2 to the nearest city to deliver in a hospital where my friend said have less than stellar ob nurses. : I really wanted to deliver here in my town where all of my nurses know me and my history. I am off to pray--Thanks mamas

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