Talk to me about C-Sections... - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 04-05-2005, 03:48 PM
 
Mamabug&co.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Somewher' in the Wild Horse Desert
Posts: 1,849
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Are they scary, do they take forever to heal? I was not supposed to get pg again, because I had a rectocele repair and paravaginal surgery done after my baby boy was born in 2003. It was excruitiating!! So, Dh was supposed to get a vasectomy, and well, we ended up pg before he went in. So, its a given that I will have to have a C-Section. Anyway, are they very dangerous? I have heard horror stories of baby's having their heads cut or faces etc. I am terrified at the thought of surgery. I took forever to heal from my last one.

Mommy to five wonderful earthlings, and one on the way supporter Humble Wife and Mother Learning to live through Jesus!
Mamabug&co. is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-05-2005, 03:54 PM
 
Tummy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: In her daddys eyes
Posts: 3,413
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I had a emergency c/s with my first child at 10cm, YES THEY ARE SCARY.. regardless if they are scheduled or emergency.. there is risks with any kind of surgery.. c/s are major surgery too.
I am sure more mamas will post infor for you ,.. perhaps a few links too.
Best of luck hon!
Tummy is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 03:55 PM
 
MsMoMpls's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Twin Cities
Posts: 1,993
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Oh dear, I am sorry if we all scared you. Of course most people here are anti- C-sect because they are way over done, done for many of the wrong reasons and not the best way to have a baby but they are not horrible. I have had two c-sects and one V-BA2C. The vaginal was way better. Just a beautiful loving experience I have ever had. However, my second c-sect was pretty beautiful, too. My first was more of an emergency situation and I was poorly prepared for it, so it wasn't great- although I did get back to school less than a week after the birth and had no complications physically, just some emotional ones. My second was after 40 hours of labor and I was so thankful that they were so gentle and supportive and I recovered easily... not as easily as vaginal but pretty easy. And all three of my babies are healthy and isn't that the measure of a good birth- a healthy baby?

Maureen
MsMoMpls is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 04:19 PM
 
Mamabug&co.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Somewher' in the Wild Horse Desert
Posts: 1,849
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have to agree that my 3 previous VB's were very sweet. The pregnancies were a different story though- last two were premature, and the last I was on bedrest for awhile and on meds to stop labor. But, this time I am so scared. I have faith though that everything will be okay Thanks

Mommy to five wonderful earthlings, and one on the way supporter Humble Wife and Mother Learning to live through Jesus!
Mamabug&co. is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 04:34 PM
 
Sarasein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: North Texas
Posts: 194
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am currently 31 weeks pg and will be having another c-section by 39 weeks. For me, it is the way I think. I know that I can't have a vaginal birth and have come to terms with that. I think the biggest factor is coming to terms with the whole birth. I am not looking forward to having a c-section, but I am looking forward to my new dd. But, I can accept that this is my only option and everything will be ok. The hospital that I am using is a lot more breastfeeding friendly. With my first DD, they gave her several bottles and that causes so many problems at first. I will be strict about no bottles and no pacifiers. One plus is if I start to get sick again, they can take the baby sooner and hopefully, I won't be so sick after she is born. My DD labor was awful, I was too sick to get though it naturally and ended up on tons of drugs. And then after if was all over and I had my c-section, I had to morn the loss of her birth the way I wanted it. This time, I know going in what I am getting in to. It is not so traumatic when you know your going to have a c-section, than when you’re the 10% that get transferred to the hospital and the 3% that end up with a c-section.
Sarasein is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 04:44 PM
 
burritomama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Location: Aztlan
Posts: 965
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I had a c-section due to complications that I don't have time to go into here. Even though this was not the birth we would have chosen, all things considered, it worked out well. The staff and docs were supportive of our choices throughout.

I think it helped for us to realize that a c-section doens't mean giving up all power or control - really. That is how I saw/see it.

Educate yourself and prepare you and your sweetie and the people with whom you will be working.

I healed well and quickly - part of which I credit to my yoga practice before and after - as well an an incredibily supportive DH and family - and very inspiring little babe.

Best of luck to you and yours.
burritomama is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 04:46 PM
 
mamabeth's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: RUNNING errands
Posts: 3,029
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's a long story, but I had a c-section with my dd two years ago, and the c-section part of it wasn't bad at all compared to the pit labor before it. It was a bit scary, and yes, it is major surgery, but if you make the right requests you can see the baby ASAP, hold him/her, bf very soon after, all that stuff.

I did get anemic after surgery and could not get up when they wanted me to because of blood loss. So I just had the catheter in for another night, and then was okay the next day after iron pills and a hamburger.

Recovery was hard because of the scar, that is true. It was very sore for a few weeks and then slightly sore for a few more. I couldn't walk and hold the baby for a few weeks, and that might have been the hardest part, so make sure you've got some help for that.

I'm hoping for a VBAC with this one and have awesome midwives, but if worse comes to worse, I won't dread the c-sect. Good luck to you.
mamabeth is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 05:16 PM
 
OnTheFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Alabama
Posts: 3,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamabugx3
Are they scary, do they take forever to heal? I was not supposed to get pg again, because I had a rectocele repair and paravaginal surgery done after my baby boy was born in 2003. It was excruitiating!! So, Dh was supposed to get a vasectomy, and well, we ended up pg before he went in. So, its a given that I will have to have a C-Section. Anyway, are they very dangerous? I have heard horror stories of baby's having their heads cut or faces etc. I am terrified at the thought of surgery. I took forever to heal from my last one.
I am the Cesarean Goddess. Someone should direct you to Birth and Beyond. We have a csection support thread and we talk about csection, the good bad and the ugly, and we also post birthplans.

Let me first say you can have a wonderful birth and a positive experience! I had one and it was probably far easier than a lot of vaginal births you read about. I have a uterine anomaly so I know all about having to have a csection, so I decided to fully educate myself, talk to hundreds of women about csections, and try to pass that info along.

I know what it feels like to be terrified, but with a good provider and pain relief -- you can have a great experience.

First let me say, a lot of stuff is way exagerated about csections on this forum. Yes there are accidents, but its unlikely your baby will be cut during a csection. Also csections are very safe, unlike something you will be told here. Is there more risk to having a csection vs a vaginal birth -- umm yeah but not for you. A vaginal birth would incur more risk to me and my baby, not to mention rupture rate because my uterine cavity is deformed and been cut on -- so for us chicks that require csections, they are safe. Planning a csection is safer than a non planned one (and there are studies to back this up) And it appears with your prior surgery your doctor probably doesnt want you to labor as the risk of rupture is increased, not to mention cord injury.

I had a fairly easy time with my last csection (I talk about it on the csection support threads, we have had them for 15m now). I had a great doctor, nursing staff, and anest. I got everything I wanted, including great pain relief. I had my baby on my chest and was able to breastfeed shortly after surgery. I had a great recovery and left the hospital when he was less than 48 hrs old. I am currently planning another csection in 9 weeks with no worries.

Feel free to PM me and please join us on the Csection Support thread.
OnTheFence is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 05:17 PM
 
cmb123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Connecticut
Posts: 1,440
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
As sarasein said, I think if you go in feeling as good about it as you can, you can have a great experience. Since you know this is what has to be done, do what you can to make it the best possible experience you can.
Plan who will be with you, have a celebration, and plan your post-partum support early so you can get as much rest and healing as possible with your new baby.
I don't in anyway want to belittle the dangers of c-sections, but they are one of the most commonly practiced procedures, and if you have an excellent doctor on board, you can probably expect all to go well.
Best of luck to you!
cmb123 is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 05:59 PM
 
mightymoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Mass. Confusion
Posts: 10,291
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes, C-sections do carry risks, but the risks are still very small. Overall its a very safe way to give birth. You see this birthing community push the risks of C-sections because it is more risky than vaginal birth, despite the fact that the medical community treats it like it has no risks.

As far as to whether the actual procedure is scary, I think it depends on you and your point of view and the situation. I didn't think my c-section was scary, it wasn't a planned c-section, but it wasn't a crash c-section either - we had made the decision to go for the c-section after a long labor and it took a few hours before I got into the operating room (but we weren't in a situation where the baby was in immediate trouble and we needed to go fast, etc). I didn't like it per se, I felt very out of it during the birth and for a hour or two afterwards. However, I wasn't scared during the birth - it seemed to be over pretty quickly.

From what I can tell I healed pretty quick (from hearing others stories). I was up and walking the next morning (I had the c-section at night), out of the hospital 48 hours after the birth. It really hurt to move around, roll over, etc for a good week, then slowly faded and probably took about 6 weeks before I was really completely out of pain and a long time before I really felt 'healed'. Even today I have no feeling in a lot of the skin above my scar.

So in the end, it wasn't the birth I wanted by any means, I wouldn't want to do it again if I could help it, but it wasn't a traumatic experience either. Certainly having it be planned would have made it a bit easier - I would not have been exhausted and I may not have been so out of it during and after.

Mightymoo - Mom to DD (6) and DS (4)
mightymoo is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 06:37 PM
 
OnTheFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Alabama
Posts: 3,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I wanted to add somethings to the thread.

As far as pain relief. If you are really concerned about pain you can get an epidural vs the spinal. Some obs prefer the spinals, but most will operate with an epidural for a planned csection if you ask. What you can do is get the epidural and then they can leave it in, through the cath they can administer meds. The meds are delivered by a timed dose, or you can dose yourself through a patient controled pump. It will work like a walking epidural. You should be able to move and feel your legs, sit up, etc without pain. The meds will also not go to your head, so you can go longer without having to have something like demeral or morphine. Right before mine was removed, I was given a good dose and was pain free for several more hours. I was up within 20 minutes of having the epi cath and the other cath removed, pain free. I went to the bathroom and took a shower, and walk around the room a little bit. This helped to relieve the stiffness. If your doctor is adament about not operating with an epidural, you can get duramorph in your spinal. It may cause itchiness and you may have to take benadryl for that. It varies if this will happen from patient to patient. I have read studies showing 20% get it to some that say 40% get this side effect.

Some things about surgery: Plan your csection for the middle of the week if possible. Most people like morning surgeries, I prefer midday. Try to go and meet the L&D staff if possible the week before hand. Ask questions about good anest. and request the best one. Ask about what to expect in the OR. If they have a recovery room, try to book your csection on a slow day of the week and request to recover in a L&D room. This way you can have your baby immediately and have "guests" if you want. If you are prone to getting sick in the OR from anest. request Zofran. Phenegran will make you sleepy and feel like you are in the twilight zone. If you want, have a CD of music playing. You usually can have at least two people in the OR with you. Ask if you can take photos and/or pictures. They can lower the drape for you to show you the birth and baby immediately or place a mirror above you. You don't have to be strapped down like you are Jesus Christ, you can request to have one or both your arms free. Get a post partum doula if you do not have family to help you out -- they will be invaluable. I have a sister who is an RN who literally is a life safer. Ask for sutures, double layer and on the outside, vs staples. It will make your scar prettier and give you the feeling that you are put together better. If you are allergic to adhesive, be sure to tell them, they can use paper tape on your "wound".

Before Surgery: Several days before surgery, I cut red meat out of my diet and eat six small meals a deal. What you eat a few days before, you will be passing later if you get my drift. Drink plenty of fluids and try to go to the bathroom as much as possible. Keep things moving. Trust me, this is important. LOL
Talk to your doctor about eating after surgery and fluid intake. Pack socks, a boppy, a pillow from home, lotion -- comfort items for your recovery. Chapstick is a must! (or some lip balm) The night or morning of your surgery, bathe with antibacterial soap. Trim things up because you will get shaved. (I suggest doing this a few weeks before ) I actually put on makeup and fixed my hair but to each their own!

After Surgery: As soon as you can get up and move. Walk. Go to the bathroom. Drink, increase your diet from soft foods to solid foods. For gas, and you probably will have it, ask for a rocking chair from the nursery if one isnt in your room and rock in it. This will get the gas moving in your body. The rocking motion will help prevent getting pains in your upper shoulders and back. GasX is your friend. Nurse often. Get help getting comfortable to nurse. The football position is best or laying side to side. Use the boppy to help support the baby. Cough. You don't want to get pnemonia. Another reason to get up and move (and to prevent clots) Also they now have those massage booties for surgery patients, your hospital may or may not have them, but it never hurts to ask. Ask for pain meds as often as you need them.
OnTheFence is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 06:43 PM
 
mightymoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Mass. Confusion
Posts: 10,291
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Since OnTheFence mentioned pictures, I thought I would add this - I had my husband and midwife with me in the OR. My midwife took pictures with our camera with black and white film. I know some people are grossed out by the idea of taking pictures of a c-section but I'm really really glad she did - and I'm glad we did B&W. I have about 4 pictures of them taking her out and the B&W makes it so much easier to take in. I'm glad we took pictures in the OR because I have some great first pictures of daddy & daughter in the OR that we would have missed out on otherwise. Having my midwife do it was good too because she had attended c-sections before and wasn't too squeemish to look and take the pictures and it left my DH free to be with me

Mightymoo - Mom to DD (6) and DS (4)
mightymoo is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 06:49 PM
 
gethane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: nebraska transplant in california
Posts: 2,903
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What great advice here!

I've had 2 c-sections. My first, for my first child just wasn't that bad. I don't really remember being that scared. The worst is the epidural imo. And how sleepy I got during the surgery. I was too sleepy after and it was hard to hold the baby and try to breastfeed. I had the epi left in for 24 hours and really was never in pain above, say a 6 and that would be just briefly before meds kicked in. I never though my c-section was bad at all, or the recovery. Until that is, I had my 2 vbac's and found out how much easier it was .

I had a csection for my last as well. It was going to be a scheduled section, since no doctor around here will do a vbac (even though I'd had 2 successful ones, grr) but ended up being an emergency due to my extremely high blood pressure. I could harrdly see, and had been having headaches for about 2 weeks. I never spilled any protein, but they were very concerned, as was I because I felt very very sick. So anyway.

The second one was easier in some ways, but a harder recovery (well i was 12 years older what did i expect!) I wish I had demanded more codeine. The 2.5 weeks worth they gave me wasn't enough. Really i needed some codeine pain relief for about 4. If I should have another I'll make that clear UP FRONT that i want prescriptions in hand for 4 weeks of codeine relief when I leave. Then I can ENJOY my baby and not be so concerned with soreness. I had some trouble healing up this last time and had an open wound for a little while (didn't even know that could happen!) However, after the first I had more soreness in general in the area for longer. I haven't felt sore at my incision for a year or so now!

Good luck. All I can really say is its not really that bad. My husband was there with me, I cried when the baby was born and they let me look at him. It sucked I couldn't nurse right away, but better than being dead from a stroke from my high blood pressure ya know? And we're still nursing now, 17 months later. I won't lie to you though, c-section babies are harder to nurse (IMO). But with persistance and patience it can still work out fine.

I think as far as post operative pain, well I really think my episiotomies were more painful than my c-section, but I was pretty careful with my c-section too. You don't have to pee over your c-section area either. After what you've already been through, I think a c-section will be a piece of cake. Dr's like doing c-sections, and so they usually do whatever they can to make you comfortable and happy so that you tell all your friends how wonderful your c-section is .

edited because I am like, what? taking drugs? can anyone understand me today? I'm incoherent
gethane is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 07:07 PM
 
edamommy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 2,976
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If it's planned maybe it will not be so awful. But mine was an emergency and I've never fully emotionally healed from not having a baby "born". I shudder everytime someone asks "when was he BORN"... and still cannot consider the csection a birht... it was more of a "cutting and yanking" my baby out of me... anyway... I will not go on as mycsection is in no way indicative of your own! GOod luck.
edamommy is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 07:19 PM
 
OnTheFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Alabama
Posts: 3,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Gethane:

Just so you know you can request no preop or drugs during surgery that will make your loopy (mind altering). During the suturing phase they often administer a sedative to help you relax, and sometimes before surgery too! This is even if you are fine and not stressed out at all, but if they sense you are panicky or scared, they will dose you up into the twilight zone. So if you ever have another section be sure to mention this.

About nursing:

Nursing can be more difficult. I personally have had no trouble nursing. My son, was not interested in nursing at all until he was nearly 13 hrs old but I don't think this had anything to do with my csection because I have talked to moms who have had vaginal births (natural ones as well) that said their babies were like this too. Jack definitely didn't act drugged at all. In fact he came out screaming and very alert and stayed awake for a long period of time after surgery checking things out! Knock on wood, hopefully this time will be easy too.
I will say it helps to have a really pro breastfeeding hospital staff and doctor. I had this both times, and each time a lactation consultant came in after surgery to help me out. This is another plus to planning a csection. You can request a L&D nurse that is experienced with nursing, I found that they were so helpful and more readily available. I also had a pediatrician and baby nurse that didn't freak out when it took my youngest a long time to want to nurse and just let us work things out on their own.
OnTheFence is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 07:22 PM
 
gottaknit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 2,776
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I had an C/birth after an attempted homebirth. It was quite painful during and afterwards. But I think the 40+ hours of labor, pitocin, etc, might have had something to do with the recovery time.

I've talked to friends who have experienced both vaginal and planned C-births, and many said the C/births were easier for them to recover from, and less painful. I really think it has to do with the fact that they were planned, not emergent. The women were mentally prepared, well-rested, everything was relaxed, and the experience was as beautiful and wonderful as you might imagine a perfect vaginal birth would be.

(BTW, I'm not advocating elective C/births that aren't medically necessary, so please everyone, don't jump down my throat for saying c/birth can be great. )
gottaknit is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 07:36 PM
 
ramlita's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: eating pesto in Vermont
Posts: 2,936
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What a great conversation!

I was wondering if anyone here has information about cord-cutting during a c-section. cordclamping.com has some great info about the benefits of delaying cord clamping, but I can't find anything describing the best way to handle it during c-section.

During vaginal birth, the ideal in most cases seems to be to wait to cut the cord until after the placenta has come out on its own.
During a cesarean, is it possible to remove the placenta right after the baby, still attached, without doing problematic damage to it and/or the cord?
Is it worth the effort?

...This may seem off-topic, but I was hoping it would fit into the picture of how to plan for the best cesarean birth possible.

DIYer mama to DD 11/00 and DS 6/05- both intact, naturally!
...missing Mothering Magazine...
 
ramlita is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 07:42 PM
 
gottaknit's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 2,776
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
One other thing: They gave me iron supplements to take afterwards and they caused horrible constipation. If I had it to do over, I just wouldn't take them.
gottaknit is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 07:54 PM
 
OnTheFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Alabama
Posts: 3,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottaknit
I had an C/birth after an attempted homebirth. It was quite painful during and afterwards. But I think the 40+ hours of labor, pitocin, etc, might have had something to do with the recovery time.

I've talked to friends who have experienced both vaginal and planned C-births, and many said the C/births were easier for them to recover from, and less painful. I really think it has to do with the fact that they were planned, not emergent. The women were mentally prepared, well-rested, everything was relaxed, and the experience was as beautiful and wonderful as you might imagine a perfect vaginal birth would be.

(BTW, I'm not advocating elective C/births that aren't medically necessary, so please everyone, don't jump down my throat for saying c/birth can be great. )
gottaknit what you posted was right no. I know mom's who have had also had both and similar experience. A planned csection is so much different than one that is urgent or an emergency or one that is after laboring. That is when I talke to VBAC to be moms who are "on the fence" about having a VBAC to really investigate their motives and their commitment to VBAC.
OnTheFence is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 07:58 PM
 
gethane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: nebraska transplant in california
Posts: 2,903
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by gottaknit
One other thing: They gave me iron supplements to take afterwards and they caused horrible constipation. If I had it to do over, I just wouldn't take them.
I have to agree with this. THey did that with my first one, and I faithfully took them and did have a lot of pain associated with constipation. With my second section I did not take iron and never did get constipated or have trouble going or have pain because of it.
gethane is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 07:59 PM
 
OnTheFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Alabama
Posts: 3,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ramlah
What a great conversation!

I was wondering if anyone here has information about cord-cutting during a c-section. cordclamping.com has some great info about the benefits of delaying cord clamping, but I can't find anything describing the best way to handle it during c-section.

During vaginal birth, the ideal in most cases seems to be to wait to cut the cord until after the placenta has come out on its own.
During a cesarean, is it possible to remove the placenta right after the baby, still attached, without doing problematic damage to it and/or the cord?
Is it worth the effort?

...This may seem off-topic, but I was hoping it would fit into the picture of how to plan for the best cesarean birth possible.
This was actually discussed recently on our csection support thread. If you are RH- or have ABO incompatibility, cord delay is not an option. LisaG on the csection support thread posted an article by one doctor about delayed cord clamping -- its the only one I have read. Most OBs I have talked to say its not possible or that it poses a risk of infection and can get in the way of doing things to a baby that may need "help" after a csection. Some babies born from csection may be slow to start and pink up or have other issues. This wasnt an option for me (ABO incompatibility) so its not something I have dug deep for to investigate. One of the moms on the csection support thread said her doctor was willing to do it. I think its really up to the OB but it would be great if there was more information about this on there.

Note: I did get to see my placenta from my last birth.
OnTheFence is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 08:29 PM
 
Sarasein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: North Texas
Posts: 194
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheFence
If you are RH- or have ABO incompatibility, cord delay is not an option.
What is ABO incompatibility? I am O+, but DD 1 and DH are A+. Is that what your talking about? Also, thanks for all your advice.
Sarasein is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 09:03 PM
bec
 
bec's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Illinois
Posts: 6,008
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I had a c-section with my first. At the time, I thought it was the most horrible thing possible. But I recovered pretty quickly. I was doing mostly everything at around 1 week post partum, and would say that I was completely recoverd at 1-2 months.

My VBAC with my second was very healing for me emotionally. I think, if I had had no choice, or if I had felt that it was medically necessary, or if my baby had ever been in any real distress, it wouldn't have taken me so long to get over it and move on. If I had had time to prepare, to wrap my mind around it, it wouldn't have been such a shock and such a trauma.

My second was born with a cleft palate (obviously having nothing to do with the surgery). But it wasn't discovered until she was 5 weeks old. She was getting sicker and sicker. She was losing weight, not thriving, and generally scaring the tar out of us. Once we discovered the cleft and I started pumping, she had a remarkable turn around. She became big and healthy. My point in telling this story is that around this time, I had an epiphany. Katie was a c-section birth, had tons of interventions, but was a picture of health. Emily was the very most perfect home birth I could have possibly imagined. But she was in real trouble just weeks after being born. While it would have completely infuriated me for someone to say this to me after Katie's birth, I was able to come to the point after Emily's birth where I can honestly say that it doesn't really matter how they got here, what matters is that they are healthy and strong.

I am not diminishing the dangers of c-sections, or the emotional trauma that can come with them. And I will be doing everything in my power this time around, but I am definitely more relaxed about it. And, it sounds like in the OP's case, the c-section will be necessary for the health of the baby and the mother.


Bec

Mama to: Katie, Emily , and Abby
Not perfect, Just amazing!
bec is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 10:41 PM
 
matts_mamamama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 874
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My son was born via c-sect (emerg.) after 18 hours+ of labor. Personally, I didn't find it that horrible - actual surgery or recovery wise. My dh was in the or, took pictures and I was able to hold and nurse my son within minutes after the birth. Although I am not good with meds, the anti-nausea stuff they put in my IV was AWESOME!

The worst part of recovery was actually while we were still in the hospital - the setup made it difficult for me to sit up and get ds really fast when he cried. Once I was able to move around, I chose not to lay flat and that helped (you never realize how much you use those ab muscles until you aren't supposed to!). Aside from a slight allergy to the adhesive they used over my staples, I had a pretty easy recovery once we got home. The tricks I learned? Hold your scar area when you cough or laugh; don't try to do too much too fast (I felt so good the first couple of days I totally overdid it!!) and don't be ashamed or afraid of the gasX and pain meds!

It's possible I may have to have a c-sect with this baby, but knowing and being able to prepare emotionally and physically for it will make it that much easier - and I think that should be true in your case as well. Yes, there are dangers - it IS surgery. But obviously for you (OP) it is less dangerous than the alternative.
matts_mamamama is offline  
Old 04-05-2005, 11:49 PM
 
rainbowmoon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Vermont
Posts: 10,800
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
my c/s itself was great. it was not planned (I was a birth center transfer) but I lucked out and had a good hospital experience overall for the birth. nobody was coercive at all and the nurses and my dr. were just wonderful.

however afterwards sucked as I developed serious complications after being discharged (pancreatitis,gallbladder attacks, UTI's,dehydration,etc) and needed blood tranfusions as well. so imho there are serious maternal risks involved.

btw I ended up hospitalized for ds 2nd week of life which sucked. the hospital staff (mainly the dr's) were awful to me compared to the maternity ward which was traumatizing as a PP mom (I was at one hospital for 1 day which was fine, then was transferred back to the hospital ds was born at for 5 more days and it was just awful)

overall it took me about 6 months to completley heal physically.

my advice is to just prepare yourself as much as you can and go into it with a positive attitude. the c/s support thread is a great place btw

Blissful Mama to DD-(5), DS-(6) and someone new due in November!
rainbowmoon is offline  
Old 04-06-2005, 01:30 AM
 
OnTheFence's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Alabama
Posts: 3,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sarasein
What is ABO incompatibility? I am O+, but DD 1 and DH are A+. Is that what your talking about? Also, thanks for all your advice.
I was totally unfamiliar with it, but I am o+ and my husband I believe is AB+. When our first baby was born she had dangerously high biliruben levels and it was determined that it was caused because her blood type was different than mine (AB). Evidently some babies require blood tranfusions from this. When I was pregnant with Jack I did more research into it but most of the info has escaped me, one thing I did read was that the cord should be clamped immediately after birth.
I will see if I saved anything in my favorites. I am sure someone else can explain it better!
OnTheFence is offline  
Old 04-06-2005, 03:31 AM
 
galadriel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 505
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I had an unplanned c/s after 36 hours of labor (4 hrs of pushing), and am having a VBAC any day/week now. Sections are certainly more dangerous for you and baby, but except for a few dry heaves toward the end of the surgery, I personally didn't find it terribly unpleasant, and my baby has always been super healthy. I really loved ordering room service for two days afterwards, I recovered within a week, and had no breastfeeding trouble. But, I think I was pretty lucky, too.

I certainly wouldn't ever do it again if I had a choice, but all in all, it wasn't bad. Good luck to you!
galadriel is offline  
Old 04-06-2005, 04:10 AM
 
Our3Miracles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: City of Roses
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is it possible after Two C-sections To have a Vbac? IM curious is all. I'd Like to "TRY" a natural birth, I never got the opertunity with my first being an Emergency C-section, and my Twin boys a Semi emergency C-section.
Our3Miracles is offline  
Old 04-06-2005, 04:23 AM
 
EStreetMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 2,821
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For your c-section, ask the doctor how they close the uterus. They should close in 2 layers. For awhile, doctors were trying to close in one layer, and it caused lots of problems. If your says one layer, I would seriously consider finding another doctor!
EStreetMama is offline  
Old 04-06-2005, 04:29 AM
 
crazy_eights's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Nisht ahir un nish aher
Posts: 6,526
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheFence
Is there more risk to having a csection vs a vaginal birth -- umm yeah but not for you.
Just for the record, prior rectocele repair and paravaginal surgery are not uterine rupture risks for subsequent pregnancies. The risk is in ripping up the previous (and as mentioned, excrutiating) prior surgery to the rectum and vagina. I can totally see not wanting to wreck the prior work and having to have it done again. Shudder. I think a c/sec will be a walk in the park after what you went through with that surgery. But wouldn't want you to worry about something that doesn't apply to you (increased risk of uterine rupture).
crazy_eights is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off