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#1 of 24 Old 03-20-2009, 08:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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so i have 2 copies of the MTHFR gene. for a LONG list of reasons, i have been told i risk out of the ONLY birthing center, AND i risk out of HB.
i am so upset right now. any info on this would be helpful, all i can find is stuff that is making me more depressed. i did not want to have another hospital birth, but i looks like im doomed to it.
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#2 of 24 Old 03-20-2009, 11:05 PM
 
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I've only done a small amount of research on mthfr (for myself) and I've had 3 homebirths; could you be specific about what reasons you were given that risk you out of homebirth?

I'm an optimist, so it would take a lot for me to give up on a homebirth. But, if you truly can't have one, then I'm sorry for you and I hope you can still do what you need to to ensure you have an empowering, beautiful birth experience.
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#3 of 24 Old 03-21-2009, 02:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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the risks i was given by the birh center were: pulmunary embuli, amniotic embuli, placental abruption, stroke, still born from labor, and losses in 2nd and 3rd trimesters. i did not see how they related to BIRTH its self, until, they told me that because of having both copies of it, that i could get to a point after delivery where my blood does NOT clot, and i could start bleeding out of everywhere. i did do some research, and the risk in a low risk pregnancy is only about 0.15%, and with me the risk goes up to 7%, and that is a pretty big jump, and so the birth center will not take me.
i talked to 1 hb midwife today, she said she would not touch me with a 10 foot poll, and then i talked to 2 other doctors who pretty much said the same thing that the birth center did.
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#4 of 24 Old 03-21-2009, 12:35 PM
 
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If sounds scary to me. This would be a rare condition under which I would feel more comfortable birthing in a hospital.
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#5 of 24 Old 03-21-2009, 05:04 PM
 
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I've done some research into the MTHFR gene variant for a friend who has FVL. It's really something I would NOT screw around with -- the risks to you and the baby in a worst case scenario are pretty bad and they're not the sort of thing that a home birth midwife can handle. Moreover, they ARE the sort of thing that a hospital would help with. It's really important that we all know our limits -- it sounds like the midwives that you talked to do, and they're saying that you're beyond what they can handle safely.

I see that you're in Colorado... I know that there are several practices in the Denver area that offer waterbirths in the hopital and that there are a lot of pretty crunchy midwives working in the area hospitals. If I were you, I'd get some recommendations from others in your tribal area and set up the coziest, safest, calmest hospital birth you possibly could.
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#6 of 24 Old 03-21-2009, 05:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by fairygirl13 View Post
so i have 2 copies of the MTHFR gene. for a LONG list of reasons, i have been told i risk out of the ONLY birthing center, AND i risk out of HB.
i am so upset right now. any info on this would be helpful, all i can find is stuff that is making me more depressed. i did not want to have another hospital birth, but i looks like im doomed to it.
What type of copy of the gene do you have?

"With MTHFR, there are two different genes identified for this mutation, and it's possible to be "heterozygous," "compound heterozygous," or "homozygous." The MTHFR gene mutation has varying degrees of possible implications. The order of potential severity from most to least is:
1. C677T & C677T (Two C Copies - C677T Homozygous)
2. C677T & A1298C (One Copy of Each The C & A - Compound Heterozygous)
3. C677T (One C Copy - C677T Heterozygous)
4. A1298C & A1298C (Two A Copies - A1298C Homozygous)
5. A1298C (One A Copy - A1298C Heterozygous)"

Blessed with two BEAUTIFUL little girls: Kylie (09/06) and Maggie (4/09) :
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#7 of 24 Old 03-21-2009, 06:15 PM
 
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the risks i was given by the birh center were: pulmunary embuli, amniotic embuli, placental abruption, stroke, still born from labor, and losses in 2nd and 3rd trimesters. i did not see how they related to BIRTH its self, until, they told me that because of having both copies of it, that i could get to a point after delivery where my blood does NOT clot, and i could start bleeding out of everywhere. i did do some research, and the risk in a low risk pregnancy is only about 0.15%, and with me the risk goes up to 7%, and that is a pretty big jump, and so the birth center will not take me.
i talked to 1 hb midwife today, she said she would not touch me with a 10 foot poll, and then i talked to 2 other doctors who pretty much said the same thing that the birth center did.

pulmunary embuli, amniotic embuli, placental abruption, stroke, and still birth are are related to birth itself. Aside from the still birth all of the others usually happen within minutes after birth if it's going to happen....that would be a big concern to me. I personally would not chance it at all.

Blessed with two BEAUTIFUL little girls: Kylie (09/06) and Maggie (4/09) :
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#8 of 24 Old 03-22-2009, 01:19 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by jeliphish View Post
What type of copy of the gene do you have?

"With MTHFR, there are two different genes identified for this mutation, and it's possible to be "heterozygous," "compound heterozygous," or "homozygous." The MTHFR gene mutation has varying degrees of possible implications. The order of potential severity from most to least is:
1. C677T & C677T (Two C Copies - C677T Homozygous)
2. C677T & A1298C (One Copy of Each The C & A - Compound Heterozygous)
3. C677T (One C Copy - C677T Heterozygous)
4. A1298C & A1298C (Two A Copies - A1298C Homozygous)
5. A1298C (One A Copy - A1298C Heterozygous)"
im not sure if it is 1 or 4. i know i am homozygous, and might even need heprin or lovonox next pregnancy, and they informed me that i need to be on aspirin all the time now.
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#9 of 24 Old 03-22-2009, 01:20 AM
 
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you also might want to check out this thread on MTHFR over in the birth pro forum:
http://www.mothering.com/discussions....php?t=1057258
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#10 of 24 Old 03-22-2009, 01:21 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by Belleweather View Post
I've done some research into the MTHFR gene variant for a friend who has FVL. It's really something I would NOT screw around with -- the risks to you and the baby in a worst case scenario are pretty bad and they're not the sort of thing that a home birth midwife can handle. Moreover, they ARE the sort of thing that a hospital would help with. It's really important that we all know our limits -- it sounds like the midwives that you talked to do, and they're saying that you're beyond what they can handle safely.

I see that you're in Colorado... I know that there are several practices in the Denver area that offer waterbirths in the hopital and that there are a lot of pretty crunchy midwives working in the area hospitals. If I were you, I'd get some recommendations from others in your tribal area and set up the coziest, safest, calmest hospital birth you possibly could.
i will have to look into this, i am limited by insurance, i work for Centura health, and i have to use one of our hospitals.
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#11 of 24 Old 03-22-2009, 03:16 PM
 
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I'm homozygous for the mthfr mutation and having a homebirth. Don't buy the hype. It was all speculative research and was a bunch of hooey. If your homocystein levels are normal then you are fine. The more they studied the condition the more they realized it was a common gene variant for those who are of european decent. I used to see Dr Neff at the Vanderbilt hematology clinic in nashville and even she has told me that the research has shown that it isn't clinically rel. without high homocystein. I did the whole high-risk obstetric garbage when all the Docs thought it was the end of the world and was robbed of a normal birth 4 times I hate how everyone jumps on the gloom-and-doom bandwagon before the research rolls in. Have a beautiful homebirth and understand that there is a risk of bleeding and ulcers taking aspirin esp with no history of clotting/stroke/heart attack. Do the research yourself and make an informed decision. Make sure you know how to read a research study to know how rel. and accurate it is. I have a science degree so I'm a leg up on most. I recommend "obstetric myths vs research realities" if you are serious about understanding these studies that people are so worried about... and then make up your own mind based on the facts....don't take my word for it....don't take anyone's word for it because it's your body and your baby and you who has to deal with the consequences of your decision.
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#12 of 24 Old 03-23-2009, 12:53 AM
 
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Originally Posted by fairygirl13 View Post
i did not see how they related to BIRTH its self, until, they told me that because of having both copies of it, that i could get to a point after delivery where my blood does NOT clot, and i could start bleeding out of everywhere.
I'm new to all this, but I have a question: Isn't it only a major risk of bleeding out if you are taking an anti-coagulant at the time of the birth or your blood is thin from taking them during the course of the whole pregnancy? Otherwise, during your pregnancy you would be taking alfalfa etc both for your own blood clotting ability as well as what you will give to your baby.

Is it possible to take it only before you conceive and in the first trimester?

I mean, surely your drs wouldn't want you taking baby aspirin for the rest of your life starting know, since I presume the risks of ulcers, etc from the aspirin would be more damaging than the risk of stroke, etc that comes from having a clotting disorder, which I understand mthfr is not the same thing.
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#13 of 24 Old 03-23-2009, 05:19 AM - Thread Starter
 
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i will defanently look into this more. so far, all the HB midwifes i have asked wont take me, im not ok with a UC, and the only oohbc wont take me.

i do have elevated homocystein levels, im not sure how high, but they are not in the normal range, i am waiting to go get a copy of my labs.

i will have to be on the thinners up until birth, the risks of fetel demise is high, and because of other stuff i have going on, i have been told that even if i do everything i can, i only have a 50/50 shot at bring home a healthy baby. im not sure how much of that was a scare tacktic, or if its real, but at the same time i feel trapped, like if i dont listen to them, and i dont do what they say and lose the baby, then its all my fault, for not listening. but at the same time, if something happens to my baby in the hosptial, its my fault for being there instead of at home! idk
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#14 of 24 Old 03-23-2009, 06:43 AM
 
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I recently had a 2nd trimester loss & I found out that I have high homocysteine levels. People with high homocysteine are recommended to take baby asprin for life. Honestly, the risk is greater for pregnancy loss or cardiac issues then an ulcer. It isn't even a debate for me.

Mom of 5: dd (10), ds (8) & dd2 (4), my sweet baby son born still 3/2/09, and celebrating the arrival of our dd 5/7/10.
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#15 of 24 Old 03-23-2009, 12:14 PM
 
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i will have to be on the thinners up until birth, the risks of fetel demise is high, and because of other stuff i have going on, i have been told that even if i do everything i can, i only have a 50/50 shot at bring home a healthy baby. im not sure how much of that was a scare tacktic, or if its real, but at the same time i feel trapped, like if i dont listen to them, and i dont do what they say and lose the baby, then its all my fault, for not listening. but at the same time, if something happens to my baby in the hosptial, its my fault for being there instead of at home! idk
Clotting issues are very scary stuff, but I do feel that the 50/50 you were quoted is an exaggeration, since my understanding is that treatment generally is rather successful. If it were truly that scary, they'd have you on lovenox already, wouldn't they? If they want you to be on heparin or lovenox for a future pregnancy, why not now?? (Prophylactic lovenox is really not that big of a deal as long as they're following you closely - this is my fourth pregnancy on lovenox, for FVL and APAs - but yeah I won't be birthing anywhere but the hospital. Not sure what your hospital choices are, but I had a couple of nice vbacs at sky ridge). It sounds like you have no real choice. I'm sorry for your disappointment!!

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Otherwise, during your pregnancy you would be taking alfalfa etc both for your own blood clotting ability as well as what you will give to your baby.
I'm sure I must be misunderstanding this (so please forgive me if I am), but are you saying that normal people, without clotting issues, intentionally try to increase their clotting ability *during* pregnancy? Why is that not problematic re: blood flow to the baby? Just curious - I've never heard that before and it would scare the dickens out of me - I'm sure I must have read this wrong?
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#16 of 24 Old 03-23-2009, 06:39 PM
 
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I'm sure I must be misunderstanding this (so please forgive me if I am), but are you saying that normal people, without clotting issues, intentionally try to increase their clotting ability *during* pregnancy? Why is that not problematic re: blood flow to the baby? Just curious - I've never heard that before and it would scare the dickens out of me - I'm sure I must have read this wrong?
Well, this is why I'm confused too. I know it is common practice with my midwife and others I know to want moms taking alfalfa towards the end of pregnancy. It's important for your blood to be able to clot properly following birth to avoid hemmorage. (sorry I can't spell right today). Additionally, babies benefit too as they have less chance of internal brain bleeding following vaginal birth, and though I am completely opposed to circumcision, you def. would want your baby to have good clotting ability following a surgery.

So, knowing that, I would think that it is risky to do anything which would lower one's ability to clot. Which I think is why birth becomes risky when the mom is on aspirin or heparin or lovenox. Does that make sense?

It's very tricky for moms who need blood-thinners to maintain a pregnancy in order to have a shot at a full-term healthy baby to weigh those risks compared to excessive/uncontrollable bleeding at birth. I'd love to hear some opinions of midwives.

eta: I realized I needed to answer some more. It's not a problem regarding blood flow to the baby through the placenta, presumably because increasing one's ability to clot does not equal increasing clots in the bloodstream. Anyone with clots in their blood is in a high-risk situation for their own life. I'm not sure that being more pre-disposed to having blood clots is reason enough to risk a hemorrhage, imo. But, I grant there is MUCH about this topic I don't fully understand.
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#17 of 24 Old 03-23-2009, 07:58 PM
 
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So, knowing that, I would think that it is risky to do anything which would lower one's ability to clot. Which I think is why birth becomes risky when the mom is on aspirin or heparin or lovenox. Does that make sense?

It's very tricky for moms who need blood-thinners to maintain a pregnancy in order to have a shot at a full-term healthy baby to weigh those risks compared to excessive/uncontrollable bleeding at birth. I'd love to hear some opinions of midwives.

eta: I realized I needed to answer some more. It's not a problem regarding blood flow to the baby through the placenta, presumably because increasing one's ability to clot does not equal increasing clots in the bloodstream. Anyone with clots in their blood is in a high-risk situation for their own life. I'm not sure that being more pre-disposed to having blood clots is reason enough to risk a hemorrhage, imo. But, I grant there is MUCH about this topic I don't fully understand.
Well, here's my two cents. When I talk about clotting in the context of pregnancy, I'm not talking about DVTs and PEs, but micro-clots in the placenta, often not even obvious on examination of a placenta unless it gets sent to pathology, a much lower amount of clotting than what would cause a DVT. In my mind, increasing one's ability to clot over normal levels through supplements or whatever is increasing one's ability to clot, period, not necessarily that different from having a clotting disorder. I guess it's a matter of perspective - I view clotting during pregnancy as a very bad thing because it can have such serious consequences for the baby (IUGR, stillbirth, m/c, abruption, etc.). My first child, when I was undiagnosed, had some growth restriction though ultimately at birth she was a few ounces over the official IUGR designation and we did not deliver early. No clots visible on the placenta and it was not sent to pathology (it was a section for breech). In contrast, my pregnancy outcomes on lovenox have been far superior. But I got off lightly compared to some moms with clotting issues - stillbirth is always a concern.

IMO, for women with clotting disorders, it's not a tricky call at all, but I'm guessing that the homebirth angle is what would make it tricky - I realize PPH may be a more scary risk in a homebirth situation. I can see why a midwife would want to prevent a PPH, if that could really be prevented by supplementation with alfalfa during pregnancy. I guess I think that's a much more tricky call, because pregnancy is already a hypercoagulable state, the third trimester is prime time for clotting to cause problems with the pregnancy, and a lot of people with inherited thrombophilias are undiagnosed this early in life.

I've been on lovenox or heparin at delivery three times now, all vbacs (lovenox for my premature delivery, switched to heparin prior to my term deliveries; my peri does lots of bloodwork to monitor dosing of both lovenox and heparin.) and just before my last one, my OB reiterated his point that the heparin, at a prophylactic dose (which is far lower than a therapeutic dose that a person with a DVT or similar would be getting) was only an issue with regard to the opportunity for an epidural because bleeding would be difficult or impossible to control in the epidural space. He said that vaginal or surgical, he was not at all concerned about bleeding from the birth (but of course that was in a hospital situation).

Is this supplementation with alfalfa very common? Just curious since this is the first time I have come across it.

just thinking out loud...
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#18 of 24 Old 03-24-2009, 12:46 AM
 
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Is this supplementation with alfalfa very common? Just curious since this is the first time I have come across it.

just thinking out loud...
I don't think it's necessarily common. But, alfalfa or some other herbal remedies might be common especially for women who have any history of excessive bleeding. I do not think that alfalfa or any treatment given to assist in preventing hemorrhage would have any negative impact, or else there would be so many more cases of IUGR and stillbirth, which in midwife attended homebirths are quite rare (due to the emphasis during pregnancy on good nutrition, imo).

I've been thinking out loud here, too. And, I just want to clarify that although there are similarities between MTHFR and clotting disorders, I'm pretty sure that MTHFR is not, itself a clotting disorder. It is a genetic disorder that is (arguably) linked to the following: decreased ability to absorb folic acid, blood clots, stroke. MTHFR is very common on one gene, but less so on 2 genes and varies by degree in that respect. Additionally, many people are thought to carry the gene and have no realization of it, not suffer any negative consequence from it. For women who experience multiple miscarriages it seems an "easy" fix to simply take an increased dose of folic acid and baby aspirin preceding and during pregnancy. Increasing folic acid has no side effect, whereas taking baby aspirin is not without some risk, which is the risk I was speaking of.

And, many women who are diagnosed with MTHFR have a spotty pregnancy history, meaning they may have a healthy baby, several losses, and then another healthy baby, etc. Once they start on baby acid and increased folic acid, their chances of miscarriage seem to virtually disappear. It's an area that is very new, and not studied nor understood by most women and is controversial in the medical community. I myself have only learned of it in the past 3 months and I'm very active in my local birth community and keep myself updated about most issues regarding birth. I learned of it through a friend who had a friend diagnosed and her pregnancy history sounded like mine.

It's very interesting...
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#19 of 24 Old 03-24-2009, 01:14 AM
 
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Below is a good MTHFR tutorial for those interested, I found it here:

http://lifebalanceinfertilitycoach.w...f-miscarriage/

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"MTHFR Tutorial
I’ve recently been diagnosed with having the homozygous C677T MTHFR mutation and have found various information on the subject. I was hoping this might help others that are looking for the majority of the information available in one reading…I needed to put together something to send out to my family to ensure they all got tested, so thought I’d share here. I have borrowed much of this from others, so if some sounds familiar, you likely have read it either here or on other forums. Best wishes to those who have recently been diagnosed. For those who have experienced losses, I hope your recent diagnosis and treatment proves to be the answer to your prayers. I am hopeful it’s the answer to mine and dh’s. All my best!
MTHFR Gene Mutation

What is it?
The gene MTHFR (Methylenetetrahydofolate Reductase) encodes the protein MTHFR. Its job is to convert one form of folate (5,10-Methylenetetrahydofolate) to another form of folate (5-Methyltetrahydrofolate). 5-Methyltetrahydrofolate is used to convert Homocysteine (a “bad” amino acid) to Methionine (a “good” amino acid). Therefore, if MTHFR is not doing its job as well, homocysteine will not be converted to Methionine and will be elevated in plasma. Elevated Homocysteine has been associated with a variety of multi-factorial diseases.

Essentially what this means is that the genes that instruct MTHFR to convert homocysteine to Methionine are mutated and may not be capable of doing this important function. MTHFR is an enzyme that converts Homocysteine to an essential amino acid (Methionine). When the genes are mutated you may be lacking this enzyme. Your Homocysteine levels can possibly climb making the blood clot. Some doctors don’t check for the MTHFR mutations and rely only on homocysteine levels. This isn’t as reliable as testing for the mutations, because Homocysteine levels fluctuate (if you catch your level on a normal day, you may go undiagnosed).

What Type Do I Have?
With MTHFR, there are two different genes identified for this mutation, and it’s possible to be “heterozygous,” “compound heterozygous,” or “homozygous.” The MTHFR gene mutation has varying degrees of possible implications. The order of potential severity from most to least is:
1. C677T & C677T (Two C Copies - C677T Homozygous)
2. C677T & A1298C (One Copy of Each The C & A - Compound Heterozygous)
3. C677T (One C Copy - C677T Heterozygous)
4. A1298C & A1298C (Two A Copies - A1298C Homozygous)
5. A1298C (One A Copy - A1298C Heterozygous)

The MTHFR mutation is fairly common in the general population. Approximately 44% of the population is heterozygous and another approximate 12% are homozygous for the MTHFR mutation. Compound heterozygous and homozygous MTHFR have the highest incidences of being linked to implantation failure, late term miscarriages, specific birth defects and overall vascular health. Whichever type of MTHFR you have, it should not be discounted, particularly if there is a personal or family history of any such incidences.

What Are the Implications?
Any and all of the mutations can affect homocysteine levels, but there is much dispute as to whether elevated homocysteine levels are actually needed in order for MTHFR to cause medical complications. Many other MTHFR patients have normal homocysteine levels; yet have had implantation problems, m/c(s), and/or stillbirth(s) due to clotting problems. So it is important to find out your Homocysteine levels (although again, normal doesn’t necessarily mean all is well). This is a serious field and MTHFR is a serious condition, so consulting an expert is wise.

Research shows that high homocysteine levels and/or those with the mutation show a higher propensity for thrombosis (blood clots), arteriosclerosis (hardening of arteries), Alzheimer’s, stroke, heart attack, Fibromyalgia, migraines (especially with “Aura” migraines), osteoporotic fractures, bone marrow disorders and for those of child bearing years, it has found to be connected to higher incidences of down’s syndrome, spina bifida, other neural tube defects, trisomy, miscarriage, stillbirth, implantation failure, placental abruption, preeclampsia, higher incidences of autism, amongst others. Additionally, if you test positive you may want to have your parents, siblings, and any children you may already have tested, as well. There are a few positives to this disorder. Because folate is necessary for cellular division, there is support that shows having this disorder can actually help keep certain types of cancer cells from multiplying as rapidly, so there are some benefits from having this mutation.

Treatment?
Many doctors prescribe Folgard, which is a prescription vitamin supplement containing high levels of folic acid, B12 and B6. These vitamins are what the body essentially needs to convert Homocysteine to Methionine. To put this into perspective, the average multivitamin contains 400 mcgs , most prenatals have 800mcgs of Folic Acid (200% of the normal daily value). Those that are compound heterozygous and those that are homozygous for the mutation are recommended taking 5 mgs. of Folic Acid/B vitamins (12 times the average multi-vitamin and 6 times more than prenatals). It is also recommended to begin taking a low dose (LD) aspirin (81 mgs) once a day, every day, for the rest of your life.

For those undergoing fertility treatments, often times the treatment includes Lovenox (low molecular weight heparin) or Heparin (both are anti-coagulants) during the cycle. If you have a history of implantation failure or early miscarriage, it is becoming more acceptable to use the protocol established by the well-respected Reproductive Immunologist Dr. Beers by beginning Lovenox (40mg/once a day) on cycle day 6 and continuing throughout the cycle. If pregnancy is confirmed, this dosage is likely increased (Typically up to 40mg/twice a day, but potentially higher doses are prescribed dependent upon blood work results since homocysteine levels tend to increase with pregnancy) and usage continues throughout your pregnancy. Approximately two to four weeks prior to birth, the patient is converted to Heparin and continues to take an anti-coagulant for another 6 weeks postpartum (typically switched back to Lovenox). During that time, you will typically be directed to take additional Calcium and Vitamin D, as anti-coagulants can cause bone loss (Heparin more so than Lovenox). Some doctors will recommend a bone scan after use is discontinued to ensure there are no bone density issues. While being treated with an anti-coagulant, you will typically be asked to discontinue taking the 81 mg. baby aspirin since the anti-coagulants will replace the need for the thinning property of the LD aspirin. The FDA has placed Lovenox in the pregnancy category B. Lovenox is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. It is not known whether Lovenox passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use Lovenox without telling your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. However, many doctors believe it is fine to breastfeed for the 6 weeks postpartum while still receiving Lovenox."
As found in: http://lifebalanceinfertilitycoach.w...f-miscarriage/
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#20 of 24 Old 03-24-2009, 10:25 PM
 
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Lots of info for you to absorb here. I won't add new stuff except my own MTHFR experience. I was only dx in 9/2008.

DD was conceived first try and carried to term with a healthy, normal pregnancy and homebirth. 1/2003.

DS was conceived second try and carried to term with a healthy, normal pregnancy and homebirth (although I did transfer PP for retained placenta due to uterine atony from a very fast birth caused by velamentous cord insertion. NOT related to MTHFR). 12/2005.

#3 was a chemical pregnancy in 3/2008.

#4 was a chemical pregnancy in 7/2008.

Due to thyroid issues and the repeated early losses, my regular doc sent me to a reproductive endocrinologist who wasted no time doing the full work up. In 9/2008, I was dx as being homozygous for the c allele for MTHFR. My homocysteine levels are in the low end of normal, though.

I am currently 28 weeks pregnant with #5 and having the easiest pregnancy yet. So long as my homocysteine levels and thyroid levels stay normal, I am having another homebirth with a midwife who is experienced with women with FVL.

My daily supplements:

am:
Armour Thyroid
1.6mg folic acid
100mg B6


noon:
fish oil
2000mg vitamin D

pm:
81 mg aspirin
500mcg B12
1.6mg folic acid

Prenatal vitamin (incl. 800mcg folic acid, 2.6mg B6, and 4mcg B12)

The bolded items are the specific MTHFR regimine. I am not on any additional blood thinners.

I also am treated by a NAET practitioner to optimize the b-vitamin usage in my body.

It's alot to absorb when you are first diagnosed. Good luck!
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#21 of 24 Old 03-25-2009, 04:43 PM
 
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I also am treated by a NAET practitioner to optimize the b-vitamin usage in my body.

It's alot to absorb when you are first diagnosed. Good luck!
Could you spell out what an NAET practitioner is and the benefit of being treated by one?

I'm afraid I've hijacked this thread at this point, but I appreciate you spelling out you history and regimen. I'm sure others d/x with mthfr will too.
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#22 of 24 Old 03-25-2009, 05:25 PM
 
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Could you spell out what an NAET practitioner is and the benefit of being treated by one?
Very basically, NAET is a method of fixing blockages in the body's energy pathways when it is in contact with allergens. Some allergens cause very subtle symptoms (not always itchy eyes or rashes) that affect overall health. Because the b-vitamin supplements are so important to the proper breakdown of homocysteine in the body, being sure that your body is using them well (and not having an allergic reaction to them instead) is important.

I like to joke that NAET is really just chiropractic voo doo since it's so hard to believe how it works. In my family's experience with NAET over the last year or so, I know that it actually works... it's just hard to describe how it works. DH used to take 180mg of Allegra every day and additional allergy drugs seasonally for every allergy in the book. He now only takes Allegra for flare ups from untreated allergies about 2x a month. This spring will be the big test for the other seasonal stuff. So far so good!
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#23 of 24 Old 03-26-2009, 02:53 AM - Thread Starter
 
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THANK YOU ALL SO MUCH!!!!!

i am looking into all of this now, i have read every reply, and im also reading studies from the UK right now about it.
i really am getting a lot of mixed opinions on how dangerous it is, and how to treat it. one doc said that he would have me on Heprin right now, since i am trying. others say that they would have me on the B vits, Folic acid, and baby aspirin.
i am just really confused on how big of a deal it really is now.
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#24 of 24 Old 03-26-2009, 04:35 AM
 
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It is confusing isn't it. There doesn't seem to be a lot of agreement, however it is the perinatologists & REs that seem to be more aggressive in their treatment and OBs & family doctors who question whether it really is a cause for concern. I'm choosing to err on the side of the professionals who actually deal with high risk and loss routinely rather then the docs who stumble across it in the midst of the rest of their practice.

I'm still being tested for MTHFR. I have high homocysteine & recently had a 2nd trimester loss due to a placental hemmorage.

My doctor currently has me on a high dose of folic acid (5mg), B6, B12 & a baby asprin a day. If/when I'm pregnant again, we'll try to decide if heparin is necessary. Having already lost a child, I'm willing to be more aggressive if it means a successful pregnancy.

Mom of 5: dd (10), ds (8) & dd2 (4), my sweet baby son born still 3/2/09, and celebrating the arrival of our dd 5/7/10.
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