16yr old homebirth? - Mothering Forums

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Old 05-06-2007, 07:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I've heard that teenage birther's are considered med-risk. Is this true? My 16yr old sister is 13 weeks prgnt and she wants to homebirth here baby. Will a midwife take her? There is no way she will step foot into a hospital unless its a true medical need. Both my mom and I back her up on that..(we have alot of homebirther's in my family). Does anyone have experience with this paticular situation? TIA!

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Old 05-06-2007, 07:59 PM
 
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I don't have any experiance...but I don't see any reason a 16 YO couldn't birth at home.

~Marie : Mom to DS(11), DS(10), DD(8), DD(4), DD(2), & Happily Married to DH 12 yrs.!
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Old 05-06-2007, 07:59 PM
 
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hmm Ive heard the younger you are the better. But of course I have nothing to back that up.
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Old 05-06-2007, 08:03 PM
 
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Teenage moms are prone to high blood preassure/pre-e, and cephalopelvic insufficiency. Talk to a midwife about it. I don't see why a midwife wouldn't take her and then decide later in the pregnancy if a HB is possible.

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Old 05-06-2007, 08:07 PM
 
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I think it very much depends on the maturity of her body and the quality of prenatel care. The problem arises when the body of the women is not physically mature. I think the risks are higher when they are dealing with mothers of 13/14. A 16 year old probably has a very good shot at a happy healthy homebirth!

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Old 05-06-2007, 08:11 PM
 
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If her health is good enough I'm thinking that homebirth might be a very good option for her. I had just turned 19 when I had ds and there was some negative attitude during labour because I looked younger. That's hard on a mama in labour!!
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Old 05-06-2007, 08:31 PM
 
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I think the concerns are with teenagers who are menustrating and capable of sustaining a pregnancy but are not finished growing. I think another aspect of concern is diet; there are a lot of sources that will state, unequivocally, that teenage mothers are going to have a worse diet than any others, etc. (Don't get me started on how angry they make me!) It doesn't sound like any of those concerns would be in play with your sister (unless of course she entered puberty very late, and is possibly still growing).

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Old 05-06-2007, 08:35 PM
 
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I know a woman who had a homebirth at 16, with a midwife. She did just fine.

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Old 05-06-2007, 08:38 PM
 
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The younger you are, ( a good "young' age anyway) say 16 , 17 and up- the better your body is going to handle it. Provided you are healthy. I have read all sorts of stuff from old childbirth books that advocates young mothers as the best kind, speaking of the actual birth process.

But mark my word, try to go to a doctor, and they will not want to let her go back to a homebirth. I would have her supervised under a great midwife though.

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Old 05-06-2007, 08:39 PM
 
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I've heard that teenage births can be way fast.
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Old 05-06-2007, 08:41 PM
 
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I would do it. I got pregnant at 17 and had a wonderful birth.

Mom to Dakota (6), Coy, (4), Max, (4), Lily (4), and Auri (June 19th 2010)!
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Old 05-06-2007, 09:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ok ladies, thank you very much!!! I just had a baby 10 mo ago so I'm encouraging her to eat good and take her vitamins etc. and since my mind is so fresh on birth, I'm encouraging her to get educated on birth and be informed so that she can make good choices for herself and for birth and for baby!!! I'm excited cause I know she can do this!! Thank you again!

Melissa loving my DH and DD(4yr)hearts.gif Most likely in my garden. Two angel.gif that I'll remember forever. My baby is here!!! Ethan Matthew came at 42 weeks on 5/19/10 9.10 lbs hbac.gif
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Old 05-06-2007, 09:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Oh and I am pretty sure she is past puberty and is done growing..she is physically mature so she should have no problems there.. and we are not stepping foot in the hospital..my mom was never big into doctors so we basically stayed away unless there is a broken bone..we feel the same about birth too..

Melissa loving my DH and DD(4yr)hearts.gif Most likely in my garden. Two angel.gif that I'll remember forever. My baby is here!!! Ethan Matthew came at 42 weeks on 5/19/10 9.10 lbs hbac.gif
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Old 05-07-2007, 03:07 AM
 
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according to all the papers my midwife gave me to read, being that young requires her to consult with a dr but doesn't rule anything out. it just means they like to keep an extra careful eye on things...not sure if this is more to do with the physicalities of being that young, a socio-economic thing or what
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Old 05-07-2007, 03:13 AM
 
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I don't consider 16 years old too young for birth - in fact, isn't it really the time when we start becoming biologically prime for birth?
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Old 05-07-2007, 03:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Ackray View Post
Teenage moms are prone to high blood preassure/pre-e, and cephalopelvic insufficiency.
They're also a slightly higher risk for premature delivery and birth deffects than a 20 something.

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Old 05-07-2007, 06:09 PM
 
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Wow, I'd like to see some documentation on that - and are we talking about 12, 13 and 14 year olds or are we talking about 16+ yrs? Is it only because of socioeconomic issues or age only? Because if we're talking socioeconomic, age is not a factor. If we're talking age only, I would need to see some references.
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Old 05-07-2007, 10:52 PM
 
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Well, my experience as a nurse and now as a midwife does not hold true that teens have more problems. Or that their pelvises are smaller somehow. Where is the actual science/research on that? And who is still measuring pelvises out there?

What I saw is that many teens don't take care of themselves, maybe are abusing drugs/alcohol, eating disorders, etc. Not that adults can't have the same problems. these teens did have more problems, higher complications.

But the teens that took care of themselves can do wonderful. What a great opportunity for them to become a woman, to stand up and take responsibility, to see themselves as capable, confident new mothers. I have seen many teens do just that and I am so proud of them. These teens are starting motherhood off on the right foot.

Encourage her! I would have no problem taking on a teen!
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Old 05-07-2007, 11:23 PM
 
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In my experience (not research), I have seen teens gain more weight and drop more weight than the average woman. Up 70 lbs with a normal diet, and down 70 within 4 weeks with a normal diet, while making copious milk. I worry, 'cause that's what I do, but...it seems normal/natural for some.

I really enjoy working with teens that have decided on natural childbirth. Some almost seem to take it on as a dare, when they are told childbirth is hard. That attitude seems to work really well in getting through to the end.

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Old 05-08-2007, 12:42 AM
 
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purely anecdotal, but my mom had me at 16, and she had true failure to progress with a csection. She's tiny anyway and she was so young and barely developed, and I was 8 lbs...I know all those factors aren't very often true but with her I believe it. To hear her tell the story especially. She had contractions that she said were as intense as mine in active labor and transition (she was at both of my births) for like 24 hours and never got past 3 cm. So, from my limited knowledge it sounds like her section was necessary.

My midwife also mentioned that teens tend to either have failure to progress issues with complicated deliveries or that they go reaaaallly fast. But she attends homebirths of teens, it's just something she watches for. I don't see it as something that would risk your sister out or anything at all. especially if she knows how to take good care of herself during pregnancy!

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Old 05-08-2007, 01:13 AM
 
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As a teenage mom, I was never told that I was high risk. I DID go to a hospital though, because I didn't know any different, and I'm a wimp.
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Old 05-08-2007, 01:15 AM
 
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At my childbirth class, we watched a video of a 16yo doing a home waterbirth--it was awesome. So inspiring.

Anyhow, I think it just depends on the midwife and what the laws are in your particular state.
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Old 05-08-2007, 02:20 AM
 
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i think 16 is a pretty normal age to have a baby biologically. i think it would be great for her to experience homebirth!
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Old 05-08-2007, 06:23 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Oh thank you ladies for your encouragement!!! I spent this evening with my family and we talked some more and she is on board with home birth all the way!! And trust me, I am on her to eat healthy and she was talking about walking on a daily basis to get good excersize. Between my mom and I, she will have great nutrition..I really think she will do GREAT! She is already healthy, doesn't smoke/drink/drugs..and she is on her way to eating a healthy diet! For a normal pregnancy, would the Brewer's Diet be beneficial?? I guess I need to research that now..hmm..

Melissa loving my DH and DD(4yr)hearts.gif Most likely in my garden. Two angel.gif that I'll remember forever. My baby is here!!! Ethan Matthew came at 42 weeks on 5/19/10 9.10 lbs hbac.gif
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Old 05-09-2007, 01:18 AM
 
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Originally Posted by pamamidwife View Post
Wow, I'd like to see some documentation on that - and are we talking about 12, 13 and 14 year olds or are we talking about 16+ yrs? Is it only because of socioeconomic issues or age only? Because if we're talking socioeconomic, age is not a factor. If we're talking age only, I would need to see some references.
If you are wondering about the pre-e thing there's *tons* of research that indicates that the more paternal exposure (semen) there is before the pregnancy there is decreased likelihood of pre-e. (I can easily get the references if you want as I just wrote a big paper on it for a genetics class). Other exposures to antigens (previous pregnancies, blood transfusions) pre-prenatally also reduce risk. So an increased rate of pre-e in teenaged women is probably more a function of the fact that a teenaged woman likely has had less exposure to paternal antigens and other antigens than a 20 something, but there would be many an exception. I can think of a ton of couples that have been together since they were 14 and had loads of sex before becoming pregnant even at a young age.
Let me know if you want that info cause I'll dig it out, you can even read my paper if you want. (I'm proud of it, it's the first A I ever got on a research paper AND it was from my most challenging class ever!)

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Old 05-09-2007, 01:58 AM
 
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At 16 I think she would do just fine. My Mom was married at 16 and had me at 18 and wasn't finished growing. She grew two more inches after she had me. No labour complications but she did have a horrible hospital birth where they drugged her and strapped her down.

What about all those women who were married at 16. It used to be quite a normal age for marriage Pre 1900. I am sure a lot of those women were having babies before a year was up.

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Old 05-09-2007, 02:46 PM
 
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Congrats to your sister! I might be worried about a 12-14 year old, but 16? I'm no expert, but I would think that she would do great.
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Old 05-11-2007, 05:39 PM
 
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100 years ago we would have all been having our first babies at 16-19 or so. My sister, who is 18, just had the most amazing hospital delivery--- taht is, everythign was great except for the hospital! haha. As a doula I work with a lot of teen moms and I'm astonished by their strength and athletic capability. Under 15 or 16, yes, there can be complications. But a 16 years old should be fully developed enough to handle it. If not homebirth, then why not at least a natural birth in a birth center or with a supportive hospital midwife?? Good luck!
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Old 05-13-2007, 04:51 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AmieV View Post
purely anecdotal, but my mom had me at 16, and she had true failure to progress with a csection. She's tiny anyway and she was so young and barely developed, and I was 8 lbs...I know all those factors aren't very often true but with her I believe it. To hear her tell the story especially. She had contractions that she said were as intense as mine in active labor and transition (she was at both of my births) for like 24 hours and never got past 3 cm. So, from my limited knowledge it sounds like her section was necessary.

My midwife also mentioned that teens tend to either have failure to progress issues with complicated deliveries or that they go reaaaallly fast. But she attends homebirths of teens, it's just something she watches for. I don't see it as something that would risk your sister out or anything at all. especially if she knows how to take good care of herself during pregnancy!
For a different perspective I had a csection after 22 hours of labor at 3 cm and do not consider it "true failure to progress". It was due to impatient doctors who had little faith in my ability to birth my baby at my own pace. The contractions were very painful- pitocin induced, not sure whether your mom was in a hospital or birth center or at home, which would have effected her likelihood of a csection, or whether pitocin, ctyotec or epidural was given to your mom but that can mess with a labor as well. I know also in my case, size had nothing to do with it. My identical twin sister just had her vbac baby at home after "cpd" diagnosis with the first, and she and I are petite, pretty much the same size we were in high school. If my sister (and I soon) can do it now, we could have done it at 16, I am sure.

And I agree with you that age shouldn't risk her out. I think a 16 year old has a much better chance of a healthy vaginal birth with homebirth than at a hospital.

Mama to my spirited J, and L, my homebirth: baby especially DTaP, MMR (family vax injuries)
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Old 05-13-2007, 01:54 PM
 
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I think a teen is going to be in better hands with a midwife and less likely to develop problems- I think that teens are at greater risk for some of these problems because of food choices- now it may not have as much to do with many women but as a sub-population teen women can and do fast for very prolonged periods of time- and that type of dietary risk is what Tom Brewer was addressing when he did his work-extremes of weight control can produce PE as well as low birth weight and some increase in infant mortality

teens in particular seem to be built for birthing- in my experience they go into labor and just do it-
there was an MCH epidemiology lecture at a conference in 2005 that was on a huge study-
"In the readouts we found over 1.2 million births during the 6 years value period. Around 13 percent were born to adolescents. Fifty-one percent born to mother aged 20 to 29. Thirty-six percent was born to mother older 30 years old........We found 3 increased risk for young maternal age in very low birth weight, post neonatal mortality, infant mortality. And then we also found the protective effect of young maternal age, complication of labor and delivery, c-section and birth defect.........The high risk of post neonatal mortality is most likely related to the psychological immaturity of adolescent mothers." this study was done on births in Flordia from 1996-2001
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