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#1 of 19 Old 07-16-2007, 12:42 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I am planning on having a home water birth with a midwife this winter, and just found out today that I have an anterior placenta. I hear this isn't uncommon but after having a c-section the risk lies in the placenta attaching or growing through the scar, yada yada....so my question is, what does this mean in terms of having a successful vbac, home birth, water birth, etc? Is it perfectly safe as long as the placenta stays in the uterus?
Any feedback or successful birth experiences you have had would be appreciated.

Emily Wife to Luke and Mama to: Violet 9-20-05 Fletcher 12-20-07 : and Owen 7-03-09
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#2 of 19 Old 07-16-2007, 03:10 PM
 
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I VBAC'd with an anterior placenta.

You should be fine, but discuss it with your midwife...sometimes the placenta wont detach as easily or completely if it get's "stuck" on the scar so your midwife should be prepared to control bleeding/placenta "issues" if that happens. And I'm sure she will be!

Also, an anterior placenta can lead to a posterior babe so you may want to be very proactive with the spinning babies/optimal fetal positioning exercises and labor in positions that will encourage a well positioned babe to stay that way (easy at a hb, but perhaps ask your mw or doula to remind you?)

Happy birthing!

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#3 of 19 Old 07-16-2007, 05:40 PM
 
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I too just VBAC'd with an anterior placenta. For me, my placenta was not low-lying so there was no concern over it attaching over the c-section scar. Mine did get stuck but it was because I have a history of Asherman's Syndrome (uterine scarring). I ended up with a partial manual removal. Also, my baby was posterior but that also happened with my first birth and that was not an anterior placenta.

PP gave good advice - discuss in advance with your MW and also be proactive in getting baby into a favorable position.

My best to you....
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#4 of 19 Old 07-20-2007, 12:18 AM
 
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I have an anterior placenta as well, but not c/s history.

What techniques should I be doing to ensure the baby is in the best position for birth, so that I don't get a ton of back labor and have an easier time of getting baby out.
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#5 of 19 Old 07-20-2007, 10:59 AM
 
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http://www.homebirth.org.uk/ofp.htm

and

http://www.spinningbabies.com/

These two websites have lots of info, tips, exercises, and ideas for helping a babe line up.

happy birthing!

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#6 of 19 Old 07-21-2007, 11:12 PM
 
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I vbac'd fine with an anterior placenta. The only "problems" I had were that I didn't feel a whole lot of movement until close to 30 weeks and the heartbeat was sometimes hard to isolate because the sounds of the placenta were sometimes mixed in with the heartbeat. Neither of those are really "problems" so I wouldn't worry too much about the placement as long as it's not also a previa.

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#7 of 19 Old 08-12-2007, 07:52 PM
 
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I VBAC'd with an anterior placenta as well and it didn't cause any problems. My baby like that OP position, though, and the AP might have been why. She was OP when I was 8 cm dilated and that scared me, but my midwife had me labor on my side for a while then on my hands and knees through transition and that got her turned perfectly.

Good luck!
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#8 of 19 Old 08-26-2007, 07:59 PM
 
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i had an anterior placenta with my first vbac. no one said it would be an issue.
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#9 of 19 Old 09-01-2007, 09:36 PM
 
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I had an anterior placenta with my 3rd VBAC, and no one ever seemed to think the placenta's postition was a cause for concern. But, like a couple of PPs said, an anterior placenta is likely to lead to a stubbornly posterior baby. Apparently babies are quite fond of snuggling up to their little placentas. Awwww. How cute. My little guy was OP, and no matter how much I tried to get him to turn, he wasn't having any of it. So....that was a fun labor. NOT! His nuchal arm didn't make it any easier. But I got through it with the lovely jacuzzi and a fantastic midwife and my super DH. Little guy turned at around 9cm, but that made my transition long and intense.
Good luck! I hope everything goes smoothly for you.
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#10 of 19 Old 09-02-2007, 12:07 AM
 
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I agree with the previous posters, I had a VBA2C with an anterior placenta - no problems. Never was a cause for concern at all.
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#11 of 19 Old 09-02-2007, 09:34 AM
 
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The placenta will have to be anterior AND low-placed--on or very near scar--to cause the kind of postpartum hemorrhage and/or placenta detachment problems mentioned. If it can be determined that placenta is on or near your scar, then you will want to know whether your midwife has ever done a manual removal of a placenta (which usually, but not always can be done for a sticking placenta)--along with having ways to help control a bleed. The excess bleeding is due to a placenta that will not fully release from uterine wall--so, bleeding may be difficult to control if placenta is adhered to scar. Just depends how much it is adhered--this can vary.

As for posterior presentation, well--there are several theories running around, on why some babies get themselves into a posterior position. They all make sense to me in certain ways--but we have to remember that none of it is proven, it's ONLY theory. I personally believe that posterior presentation, like all else that comes with life in a body, is the result of combined forces of the body and mind. I would no more want a woman believing that 'anterior placenta means posterior baby', than I want her believing 'once a csec, always a csec' or 'only hospitals can safely manage birth'. We need to remember that most babies present anterior, NOT posterior--whatever the woman's pelvic shape or size, for instance, or regardless of whether she has an anterior placenta or sits often in a recliner (recliner use is another 'culprit' named in posterior births).

Information is definitely a good thing! Being proactive is a very very good thing. But worrying is not a good thing--and visualizing/fearing the worst is also not a good thing. Maintaining a relaxed, trusting emotional and mental state,talking to yourself and your baby about a happy normal birth are the best things anyone can do for self and baby on every level (like, visualizing yourself handling contractions well, and visualizing your baby finding the best possible position for it's descent).

I do see that some pp's on this thread have said that their anterior placenta did not cause problems, and that is wonderful. It's so good to have this information from those who've btdt! So, gather information--from spinningbabies.com, from methods of discovering placental placement, and be proactive in your preparations...be ready for the possibility of adhered placenta by knowing what you and your mw may want to do about that if it should happen. Be ready to manage posterior labor, should that occur for you--and know that a posterior baby does NOT necessarily mean 'long labor' or 'excruciating labor'. Just try not to fear any of it--and remember that theories are just theories, and that your relaxed, open, trusting state is the best thing you can do for yourself and your baby as you approach birth.
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#12 of 19 Old 09-02-2007, 12:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MsBlack View Post
The placenta will have to be anterior AND low-placed--on or very near scar--to cause the kind of postpartum hemorrhage and/or placenta detachment problems mentioned. If it can be determined that placenta is on or near your scar, then you will want to know whether your midwife has ever done a manual removal of a placenta (which usually, but not always can be done for a sticking placenta)--along with having ways to help control a bleed. The excess bleeding is due to a placenta that will not fully release from uterine wall--so, bleeding may be difficult to control if placenta is adhered to scar. Just depends how much it is adhered--this can vary.

As for posterior presentation, well--there are several theories running around, on why some babies get themselves into a posterior position. They all make sense to me in certain ways--but we have to remember that none of it is proven, it's ONLY theory. I personally believe that posterior presentation, like all else that comes with life in a body, is the result of combined forces of the body and mind. I would no more want a woman believing that 'anterior placenta means posterior baby', than I want her believing 'once a csec, always a csec' or 'only hospitals can safely manage birth'. We need to remember that most babies present anterior, NOT posterior--whatever the woman's pelvic shape or size, for instance, or regardless of whether she has an anterior placenta or sits often in a recliner (recliner use is another 'culprit' named in posterior births).

Information is definitely a good thing! Being proactive is a very very good thing. But worrying is not a good thing--and visualizing/fearing the worst is also not a good thing. Maintaining a relaxed, trusting emotional and mental state,talking to yourself and your baby about a happy normal birth are the best things anyone can do for self and baby on every level (like, visualizing yourself handling contractions well, and visualizing your baby finding the best possible position for it's descent).

I do see that some pp's on this thread have said that their anterior placenta did not cause problems, and that is wonderful. It's so good to have this information from those who've btdt! So, gather information--from spinningbabies.com, from methods of discovering placental placement, and be proactive in your preparations...be ready for the possibility of adhered placenta by knowing what you and your mw may want to do about that if it should happen. Be ready to manage posterior labor, should that occur for you--and know that a posterior baby does NOT necessarily mean 'long labor' or 'excruciating labor'. Just try not to fear any of it--and remember that theories are just theories, and that your relaxed, open, trusting state is the best thing you can do for yourself and your baby as you approach birth.

Ok, I came here with some questions about anterior placenta and man did you cover some stuff! Not wanting to take over the thread, but what are some ways you can tell if the placenta is low-lying on the scar? My back up care wants me to have a sono this week (don't want one) to make sure. I'm keeping positive, but at almost 39 weeks it's all trying to get to me. Anyone have any thoughts on what they would do?
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#13 of 19 Old 09-02-2007, 01:36 PM
 
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If the placenta is low enough to be touching or covering the cervix you may have some bleeding/spotting during pregnacy. With my first babe I had several scans due to bleeding, each time they did a quick (5-6 minute tops) scan to make sure it wasn't due to placental location.

A skilled midwife or tech may be able to "listen" to the placenta to figure out how low it is, but this wont tell you if it's on the scar. A sono can but again you want a skilled tech, and don't let them use this scan for anything BUT the placental location. Don't let them use it to pressure you into induction or c/s for size or position or whatever it may be.

Of course, even if it's smack dab over the scar there may not be any problems! And your care provider will be ready just in case...after all, it's what they're there for. You're the one birthing your babe and they're there to encourage, support, and provide a little "just in case" care!

If you haven't had any problems and will have a skilled birth attendant you may want to skip the scan if it would add to your stress... if the placenta is low you may have more bleeding and they can do a scan while you are in labor to determine if the bleeding is due to that. And if it sticks a bit to your scar then they can give you some pit for bleeding and do a manual extraction.

happy birthing mama!

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#14 of 19 Old 09-02-2007, 01:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by wombatclay View Post
If the placenta is low enough to be touching or covering the cervix you may have some bleeding/spotting during pregnacy. With my first babe I had several scans due to bleeding, each time they did a quick (5-6 minute tops) scan to make sure it wasn't due to placental location.

A skilled midwife or tech may be able to "listen" to the placenta to figure out how low it is, but this wont tell you if it's on the scar. A sono can but again you want a skilled tech, and don't let them use this scan for anything BUT the placental location. Don't let them use it to pressure you into induction or c/s for size or position or whatever it may be.

Of course, even if it's smack dab over the scar there may not be any problems! And your care provider will be ready just in case...after all, it's what they're there for. You're the one birthing your babe and they're there to encourage, support, and provide a little "just in case" care!

If you haven't had any problems and will have a skilled birth attendant you may want to skip the scan if it would add to your stress... if the placenta is low you may have more bleeding and they can do a scan while you are in labor to determine if the bleeding is due to that. And if it sticks a bit to your scar then they can give you some pit for bleeding and do a manual extraction.

happy birthing mama!
I'm having a homebirth, so no scanning during labor. I need to talk w/my midwife again about it. When I called her after my appt. with this other midwife (the shadow care one) she said she thought it'd be a good idea to get the sono to know for sure. I wouldn't let them pressure me. I'm just frustrated this is even coming up. I've had such a laid back pregnancy and have had complete faith in my body and baby and I don't want fears creeping in. kwim? I need to post my own thread...
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#15 of 19 Old 09-02-2007, 02:15 PM
 
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A reasonably good midwife ought to be able to listen w/fetascope or doppler to determine whether or not placenta is over/near scar. I don't use scans for this w/my HBAC ladies--I just listen, and know other mws who do the same.
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#16 of 19 Old 09-02-2007, 02:25 PM
 
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A reasonably good midwife ought to be able to listen w/fetascope or doppler to determine whether or not placenta is over/near scar. I don't use scans for this w/my HBAC ladies--I just listen, and know other mws who do the same.
thanks!
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#17 of 19 Old 09-02-2007, 02:52 PM
 
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That only works when the scars location is known though (since the uterine inision doesn't match the location of the skin incision)... listening is a good option for ruling out a low placenta, but not as good for determining if the scar is covered.

But again, your midwife should be prepared for anything that might come up and it's pretty unlikely you'll have a problem! Like MsBlack suggests... stay positive and relaxed! I'm sure you'll have a wonderful birth!

ETA- I almost forgot...I mentioned the sono during labor since some of the homebirth midwives here have these little portable units (kind of like an old fashioned TV, a largish box with an itty bitty screen). I've doula'd at a few home births with one mw who always keeps a sono unit in the car...her husband is a vet and they use the same unit for his farm visits! So I didn't know if that would be an option for you.

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#18 of 19 Old 09-03-2007, 02:13 AM
 
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I had a UBAC and no idea where my placenta was.
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#19 of 19 Old 09-04-2007, 07:36 PM
 
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Just to add to this, I just had a home water birth with an anterior placenta, and all was well! It was also low lying, but moved out of the way by 28 weeks. I understand your worry - with an anterior AND low placenta, I was very worried about it growing into the uterine wall. However, I found out that this is really rare. I had a scan at 36 weeks to check that my placenta had moved out of the way, and I asked the sonographer if she could see if the placenta had grown into my scar. She said that wasn't something they could tell from a scan, but she said my placenta looked "complete" and far enough away from where my scar should be. That was good enough for me!

My anterior/low placenta was never once mentioned to me as cause for concern. I don't think there is a need to worry about an anterior placenta in terms of a VBAC. Although I did have a posterior baby (and back labour), she turned the right way round in the end and came out with barely any pushing.

Have a wonderful birth!
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