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#1 of 29 Old 12-13-2003, 04:10 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I was trying to google some info on risks of U/S. So far what I have found is inconsistent.
There are some studies that hint that miscarriages and perinatal death might be higher amoung pregnancies that had ultrasound (although the rates they quoted were 20 hours a week in addition to 5 hours of deep therapy, which is much higher than most women would ever receive in a normal pregnancy).
The study also didn't say if these rates were compared in a women to women study with women in similar pregnancy health states and risk factors with the only difference being u/s use.

Next time we have a baby I think I would like an u/s but obviously not if they are a risk ot my child. When the time comes I will discuss it with my care provider. Until then can anyone share information with in regards to the safety and/or risks of ultrasound.

Mom of a 7 yr old, 4 yr old, and 1 yr old. Wow. How did that happen?
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#2 of 29 Old 12-13-2003, 04:59 AM
 
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I have an informed consent form that you can check out the next time we get together that was written nicely by my apprentice.

I don't know how to get good, accurate information about this topic. It's so difficult when it's used so much and is presented as being safe to the point that there are businesses set up doing ultrasounds "for entertainment purposes only". It's hard to get good, reliable information.

Here is a report about babies being exposed to high intensity noise during ultrasounds

More on the noise created by u/s

Lots of studies, including some that point to an increase in dyslexia, on ultrasounds

Ultrasound: Weighing the propaganda against the facts, by an author who wrote a really compelling book called Ultrasound? Unsound!

Ultrasound in Obstetrics: A Question of Safety

Recommendation against the use of routine third-trimester ultrasounds



Of course, this is just the tip of the iceberg. I'm not sure what to believe, but I am working on having clients discuss this prenatally. I feel fine using a fetoscope for prenatal visits, but in labor it's really cumbersome and difficult to hear baby (for me) during contractions. I personally feel like the risks to baby in labor is much less than prenatally.

That said, I have read reports that state that imaging ultrasound is less intense than doppler ultrasound, in that the imaging ultrasound "pulses", whereas doppler ultrasound is continuous. However, these reports are already about six years old and could be invalid due to current technology.

One of the biggest risks with ultrasound, in my opinion, is the discovery of "problems" that are not there: low-lying placentas in early pregnancy that are pointed out and worry women, cysts on baby's brain, which are no problem most of the time, and even nuchal folds on the neck that are pointed out as markers of Down Syndrome. (Here is one mother's story of such an issue...)

It's not an easy thing to research, I've found. All I can do is offer women both sides of the argument and hope that they listen to their heart and choose for themselves.

What IS interesting is what happens when parents hear their babies with fetoscopes and stethoscopes - it sounds so different from the doppler. I usually give my clients a fetoscope from about 30 weeks on to listen to their babies whenever they want. Most people don't realize that the sound the doppler makes is NOT the sound of the baby's heartbeat as it is, but is a man made sound from the ultrasound waves. A baby's heartbeat in utero sounds much like our own, not surprisingly!
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#3 of 29 Old 12-13-2003, 06:57 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I have to tell you I wanted to hear that it is perfectly safe! I loved having U/S with dd and wanted to do that again but I don' know if its worth the risk.

Mom of a 7 yr old, 4 yr old, and 1 yr old. Wow. How did that happen?
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#4 of 29 Old 12-13-2003, 11:18 AM
 
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I have read so much conflicting studies and reports on ultrasound. You have certain magazines (hmmmm) and sites and even individuals who will lead you to believe that if you get a 10-15 minute ultrasound that your child will have all these ill effects and that it is dangerous, etc. There is a risk and chance taking with everything we do during pregnancy (this even includes a homebirth, herbs, hospital birth or taking vitamins, etc.) I personally have not been convinced that having an ultrasound is harmful, or that babies lose their hearing, or that it causes miscarriage or whatever else is said and then backed up with "evidence". Also if you do read about reports that talk about the ill effects of ultrasound be sure to check them out. I read an article that scared the mess out of me but when I actually looked at the reports and studies they were referenced in the article in this particular magazine was VERY misleading and there was a good bit of twisting of facts (I wonder which magazine that could have been ) I do live near a medical school so it is nice to have easy access to the actual study or report and reading it for myself.
While we should be cautious I personally believe that limited ultrasounds, only used when necessary (and for me that might be a quick look for mom to make sure is not miscarrying) is SAFE. The key is to be informed and not to be scared into one thing or another.
I had two ultrasounds early on in my last pregnancy. I have a history of miscarriage and a uterine deformity. I was taking medication to maintain my pregnancy and for my own peace of mind I paid out of pocket for ultrasounds at 6 weeks and 8.5 weeks. I had a third ultrasound at 22 weeks. I had a fourth ultrasound at 37 weeks and 4 days during a NST to get baby's position. (his shoulder was presenting against the cervix)
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#5 of 29 Old 12-13-2003, 03:20 PM
 
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yeah, I'm not sure either. It's all reasonable - including a study that I once read that said that cellular reproduction or growth stops during the heat of ultrasound (this could be more risky in the early parts of pregnancy and may be why there is a higher rate of miscarriage with repeated early ultrasounds? or maybe it could be because women who are at risk for m/c get repeated ultrasounds and then would miscarry anyway??).

I would think that a mid-pregnancy ultrasound is not a big deal. HoweVer, I would neVer trust an u/s growth estiimates or due date calculations after 8 weeks or so.

I myself had three ultrasounds when I was pregnant. Granted, I didn't know anything and trusted my doctor like he was god, but I would think that one u/s would be appropriate in pregnancy.

I don't think that EVERY pregnant woman should get an u/s, but it's definitely a VERY PERSONAL choice that I would neVer want to dictate for women.
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#6 of 29 Old 12-13-2003, 04:05 PM
 
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As I posted on another thread, doctors do u/s scans because they fit into your personal file better.

They also fit into an evidence file better if there is any litigation.

It is considered the best in the standard of care.

Doctors will not tell you the dangers of routine u/s on healthy pregnant women and their fetuses until they have another unproven procedure waiting in the wings. Dr Robert S. Mendelsohn was fond of saying that .

The fact that u/s scans have been done routinely on healthy women for the past 25-30 years makes us all guinea pigs in this medical experiment and there has been no signed consent forms done to affirm this.

In my mother's day, every woman had an X-ray of her pelvis before delivery. Now, even dentists will not do a dental X-ray on a pregnant patient; some dentists do pregnancy tests first on young women.

Time will tell.

Attitudes change quickly.

Do not kill the messenger.

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#7 of 29 Old 12-14-2003, 12:53 AM
 
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I don't know anything medically, but the ultrasound of my ds2 saved his life and maybe mine. I had a midwife w/my 2nd pregnancy and was not planning on an ultrasound at all. All went well with my first pg so I didn't see the need. Just by chance I had a chance for a free ultrasound at a local medical school to help out some med. students. It was discovered that I had placenta previa, which we later found out it was something called vasa previa (very rare) and if I went into labor my ds would most likely have died from bleeding to death. And a chance of me dieing, or blood transfusion or hysterectomy.
I shiver at the thought of me not getting that ultrasound and what tragedy would have occured!

Just something to think about!

missy
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#8 of 29 Old 12-14-2003, 11:31 AM
 
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Since doctors have been doing ultrasound scans on every pregnant woman they could talk into it over the last 25 years, you should know one thing they have discovered about the placenta is that it does MOVE!

It is not a stationary organ in the prenatal enviroment in the uterus. It does move around, so finding placenta previa early in pregnancy does not mean that is where the placenta will be at delivery.

There are also varying degrees of placenta previa: there is total, in which the entire placenta totally blocks the cervix; there is partial, in which the edge of the placenta covers the cervix and could be moved out of the way depending on how close it really is to the cervix; or there is marginal placenta previa in which the placenta is low-lying and threatening.

Anyway, just wanted you to know. My sister had placenta previa, and it did move, but not far enough. She had had a previous Caesarean Section and the placenta apparently had "stuck" on the scar tissue there, and did not budge.

If you went into labor in that condition, if your attendant was astute enough, they would have know what was going on early from the excessive blood (and its color) and taken you to emergency.

I would have to look up vasa previa in my Williams...

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#9 of 29 Old 12-14-2003, 03:47 PM
 
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Most vasa previa is missed in routine ultrasounds mid-pregnancy. It is a fairly difficult thing to pick up on ultrasound unless one was looking specifically for it with a specialty ultrasound.

While your u/s may have improved your baby's chances, this is sadly not the case for the vast majority of women who have ultrasounds. If more u/s saved lives and improved outcome, then we should definitely be at the top for best maternal / neonatal outcomes right? Nope, there are about 23 other countries ahead of us. Countries that do not utilize routine ultrasounds.
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#10 of 29 Old 12-16-2003, 04:24 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by pamamidwife
yeah, I'm not sure either. It's all reasonable - including a study that I once read that said that cellular reproduction or growth stops during the heat of ultrasound (this could be more risky in the early parts of pregnancy and may be why there is a higher rate of miscarriage with repeated early ultrasounds? or maybe it could be because women who are at risk for m/c get repeated ultrasounds and then would miscarry anyway??).

I think those that get early ultrasounds, multiple ones are at greater risk for Miscarriage and from what I have read most early ones are done for this reason or with inferitiliy patients who have done things to get pregnant. I know I had two ultrasounds because I was a high risk for miscarriage -- had I miscarried, I sure wouldnt have blamed an US on it. I have to many other things going against me in that area.
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#11 of 29 Old 12-17-2003, 07:34 AM
 
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However, when the ultrasound is pointed at the fetal head, it directly vibrates the sensitive hearing structure of the fetus, creating high-intensity noise in the audible range. "The fetus apparently senses these vibrations as a loud noise," says Fatemi.
Aww, this makes me soooo sad for my baby! He is out now (14.5 months) but when I was 30 weeks pregnant I had a 3-D u/s "for fun." In the pictures I got he is covering his ears. Everytime I look at that picture it makes me sad and I wish I didnt have that done. It was 30 minutes long too.

Desiree

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#12 of 29 Old 12-17-2003, 08:21 AM
 
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Originally posted by OnTheFence
I think those that get early ultrasounds, multiple ones are at greater risk for Miscarriage and from what I have read most early ones are done for this reason or with inferitiliy patients who have done things to get pregnant. I know I had two ultrasounds because I was a high risk for miscarriage -- had I miscarried, I sure wouldnt have blamed an US on it. I have to many other things going against me in that area.

Yeah, but what I always wonder is: why the ultrasounds if you have a high risk for miscarriage? What will the ultrasounds show? Or are you getting them just to confirm that the baby is still there, still with a heartbeat?

I guess I understand the peace of mind thing, but I often wonder how many women think that an u/s can predict something - like a miscarriage.

I don't think many women would blame an u/s for a miscarriage. You have to remember that in our culture right now, u/s are deemed "perfectly safe" by everyone. While there may be risks we aren't even aware of, I wouldn't be cavalier about them at all.
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#13 of 29 Old 12-17-2003, 08:31 AM
 
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Here is what I mean about him covering his ears, link to pic:
http://www.mamaessentials.com/cgi-bi...rasoundpic.jpg

Desiree

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#14 of 29 Old 12-17-2003, 03:39 PM
 
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I had to have numerous u/s at the end of both of my pregnancies. I have early babies and the u/s were needed to determine the size of the fetus. I don't agree with getting an US simply for entertainment purposes though and with both pregnancies, the us's were very quick. Only weight, formation and length were needed. My dd was born at 32 weeks and my ds was born at 36, with my first labor starting at 25 weeks. I have a great friend that and us saved his son's life. They did the "routine" us at 20 weeks and discovered a diaphramatic hernia, where the diaphram doesn't develop causing his abdominal organs (intestines, liver and stomach) to enter the lung cavity cause a defomity of the lungs (they didn't develop). Well, armed with that knowledge, they began doing research and moved to Florida to let the surgeon down there deliver their baby. Delivering here, in SC, their baby had a 20-30% survival rate. Delivering in Florida (that particular doctor) they had a 98% survival rate. Because of knowing them personally, and knowing what they went though, I have changed my mind on "routine" us...which I didn't get with either of my pregnancies. I only had the us later in pregnancy, in labor, both times. I know that the odds of something like that happening to me are very, very small. I guess it's knowing Mark and Debby that makes it seem all too real.
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#15 of 29 Old 12-18-2003, 01:48 AM
 
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Originally posted by pamamidwife
Yeah, but what I always wonder is: why the ultrasounds if you have a high risk for miscarriage? What will the ultrasounds show? Or are you getting them just to confirm that the baby is still there, still with a heartbeat?

I guess I understand the peace of mind thing, but I often wonder how many women think that an u/s can predict something - like a miscarriage.

I don't think many women would blame an u/s for a miscarriage. You have to remember that in our culture right now, u/s are deemed "perfectly safe" by everyone. While there may be risks we aren't even aware of, I wouldn't be cavalier about them at all.
I have a deformed uterus so I like to know where implantation is taken place. I have a high risk for ectopic. My first US I had was for my peace of mind. I had progesterone problems and I didn't want to continue taking it if my embryo wasn't developing properly. I had one at six weeks showing the sack and heart beat. The tech I had was a complete dumb ass. She upset me a great deal during that US and I went into my doctor and demanded another US. The tech insisted that I was miscarrying due to the heart rate. I had a repeat 2 weeks later with another tech who was far more experienced and was even able to see the septum in my uterus, got my dates right and got a good heart rate.

I know the very small risks of US and to me the risk was worth it.
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#16 of 29 Old 12-20-2003, 01:02 PM
 
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Applejuice and pamamidwife.....thanks for that information. I know all that though!
I was told (at the early u/s) that it would most likely move and all
would be well! But it did not and it was discoved that I had vasa previa
and that I would have to have a c/s! I had so many ultrasounds during
my pregancy and I am so thankful for that. My case was even more
severe b/c my placenta was also in two pieces. It was connected by blood
vessels that crossed right over my cervix and if I went into labor my ds would only have had approx. 2 minutes to live before he (and possibly me) would have bleed to death.

My details are blurry though b/c this has been 4 years ago.

But I do know that my midwife has purchased an ultrasound machine since my case b/c the thought of what "could have happened" is a tragic picture.

Pamamidwife.......would you mind refreshing my memory of vasa previa
and the differences?
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#17 of 29 Old 12-21-2003, 01:29 AM
 
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Have you ever read this issue of Mothering (I think it's 102)

http://www.mothering.com/11-0-0/html/11-2-0/ultrasound-risk.shtml

Great article IMO, not sure if this is the "certain" magazine to which a previous poster was referring?

I refused U/S w/my second (after having some hemorroidal bleeding in before week 9). My OB (who I left immediately) told me that if I did NOT have a weekly (yes, weekly!) U/S, the next time I came in at 16 wks, we'd be facing a "dead baby." I asked what in the world would a weekly U/S do to prevent a m/c? OB non-replied, "Most of my mothers love the peace of mind of seeing the baby!" My need to protect my baby from the *risk* of a weekly intervention outweighed my OB's need to charge me $500 weekly!!!

It can be upsetting when we read about potential harm that may be caused by widely accepted and well-loved procedures. We're all doing the best we can with what we know right now. The U/S debate goes on. Someday, I believe we will know much more about the risks involved with more certainty. Some mothers find themselves in different medical circumstances which warrant U/S, and I completely support their right to do what they believe to be in their family's best interest, based upon _informed consent_ (which I personally find to be sorely lacking in obstetrical care in the US!). Trust women to make our own decisions based on facts not fear!!!

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#18 of 29 Old 12-21-2003, 04:27 AM
 
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It's been proVen that doctors that haVe ultrasound machines in their offices are NOT adequately trained. I would think that it would be better to haVe people who are not only explicitly trained in u/s do them (rather than doctors or midwiVes), but also these people are up to date on current information, etc. I would neVer trust an in-office u/s to do anything but to show a beating heart. I just think buying one because of a scare is scarier to me than ordering a late preg u/s for eVery woman. The technology is not to be taken so lightly. I think the risks of belieVing that, by haVing an u/s in office, you can preVent or diagnose such things is really great.

WheneVer any of my clients want a diagnostic u/s, I send them to a specialist that has Vast experience and training. Not only that, but a diagnosis of Vasa preVia requires a special color ultrasound that is not routine in most women's pregnancies, and also a transVaginal ultrasound at the same time to View the cerVix.

In regards to Vasa preVias (sorry, the V on my laptop only works in capital!), it is extremely rare (eVen more so than other catastrophic obstetrical emergencies) - like one in 3000-4000 women. It occurs when the Vessels of the umbilical cord coVer the cerVix - in a different way than prolapsed cord. This occurs because of a low-lying placenta. The implantation of the placenta occurs so early in the pregnancy, and the Vessels may attach oVer the cerVix. They are usually exposed, without the wharton's jelly from the umbilical cord that typically protects all the Vessels. This is dangerous - and is dangerous at Various leVels of the pregnancy, not just at the end. It's unclear how to handle women who haVe this, short of deliVering their baby ASAP Via cesarean. If it's discoVered in the 2nd trimester, it gets a bit more risky as far as deliVering the baby then.

Velamentous insertion of the cord is a Varient of this. This is when the Vessels (two arteries and one Vein) are not coVered / surrounded with whartons jelly, which is the white substance that protects the Vessels in the cord. Sometimes these Vessels - or one or two of them - will be embedded in the bag of waters. This is more common than an actual Vasa preVia, but not as dangerous. (I had one client who had contractions that neVer got closer than 8 mins apart - her labor was slow and so was her baby's descent and birth....turns out she had a Velamentous insertion of the cord with all three Vessels. I belieVe that her baby needed a slow birth so the cord wasn't comprimised. It was amazing to see after the birth - and another gift of how sometimes our bodies know best)

Some placentas haVe multiple lobes - usually two. There can be Vessels running from the "main" placenta to the "satellite" placenta. This usually is an issue only with the birth of the placenta - where the satellite placenta remains in utero and oftentimes the exposed Vessels cause significant bleeding and hemorrhage. It sounds like, Mssgirl, that this is what you had - with the additional "bonus" (ugh! I cannot belieVe you went through that! how scary!) of haVing a true Vasa preVia oVer the cerVix because of this low-lying satellite placenta/lobe.

With these issues, a routine u/s is NOT going to diagnose anything. These are issues that can only be found on specialized u/s with a specialist in attendance. It's not fair to say that a mw with an u/s machine in her office will preVent a baby's death from something like this. It just won't happen. The technicality of this sort of diagnosis is too complex for someone who is trained as an aside to operate an u/s. I would only do such an u/s with a highly specialized radiologist.

This, howeVer, seems way off the topic of routine mid-pregnancy ultrasounds. There are babies who haVe been saVed through u/s, I'm sure. HoweVer, there has also been much harm that has come from trusting u/s too much (I can think of a dozen babies off the top of my head that were induced because they were "too large", only to be born two pounds less than the predicted birth weight - and some of them so early that they needed special care after the birth!!).
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#19 of 29 Old 12-22-2003, 02:43 AM
 
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Originally posted by DesireeH
Here is what I mean about him covering his ears, link to pic:
http://www.mamaessentials.com/cgi-bi...rasoundpic.jpg
Awww Des I can see why that would make you sad.
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#20 of 29 Old 01-10-2004, 03:35 AM
 
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I see that this is an older thread, sorry to dig it up. I'm just curious about something. A lot of these cautious ultrasound studies talk about the big dopplers that actually show stuff on a screen. Should I be concerned about the little hand-held dopplers too? Is is the same radiation? When I was pregnant with my first baby, my midwife tried her fetoscope at every prenatal, only to switch to the doppler because she couldn't find a heartbeat. I wouldn't consider myself "overweight" but I am definately curvy, size 12 with size 14 boobies. I would love to be able to forgo the doppler entirely (or at least until the birth, because as Pam said it is quicker and easier) but I am worried that we'll have the same problems finding a heartbeat with a fetoscope this time. I'm especially concerned because just before I conceived I dropped a 25 lb weight on my toe, and had 2 x-rays (one of which they did twice, so 3 really) before the doc realized I was pregnant. I told the tech, I had told the people at urgent care that it was possible, apparently nobody wrote it down anywhere (and she didn't ask!) I'm not so worried about that since I did tell the tech and he gave me lots of lead to wear, but I don't want to do anything else questionable if I can help it.

So anyway, what's the scoop with the hand-held dopplers?

Thanks,
Rebecca
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#21 of 29 Old 01-10-2004, 04:48 AM
 
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Rebecca, as far as the hand-held dopplers, this is the theory:

Imagine ultrasound energy (both dopplers and imaging) being a lightbulb. With imaging ultrasound, the pulses of energy are intermittent, meaning they aren't "on" all the time, but rather like a bulb going off, then on, off then on.

With a handheld doppler, the energy is constant.

If you were to hold your hand over a lightbulb, the one that flickered on and off would produce less heat and energy over time.

Evidently, 20 minutes of imaging ultrasound is equal to about a minute of handheld doppler ultrasound.

Interesting, huh? When I learned that in midwifery school, I was surprised. I thought it would be the other way around.

Here is my Informed Choice sheet on Ultrasound, written by my incredible and intelligent apprentice:

USE OF ULTRASOUND IN PREGNANCY AND BIRTH

What is ultrasound?
Ultrasound is a continuous wave of high frequency non-ionizing (considered low-energy) radiation that passes through the body and bounces off of structures. Their reflections are then interpreted by a transducer to display the info it receives or make it audible.

What is ultrasound used for?
Ultrasound is used in our practice to evaluate fetal heart tones (FHT’s) during pregnancy and labor/birth in the form of a hand held doppler. The doppler probe is placed against the skin directly above the area of the fetus to listen and evaluate FHT’s. You can also choose to have FHT’s evaluated by using a fetascope which is a stethoscope designed specifically to listen to heart tones.

You can also choose to have a visual ultrasound AKA sonogram. A sonogram provides not only auditory FHT’s but a visual picture of the developing baby. This allows for evaluation of growth patterns, anatomy, can help to rule out abnormalities, and can provide assistance with determining an approximate due date if this is not known.

External fetal monitoring (EFM) is used in hospitals for continuous monitoring of the fetal heart rate before, during, and after contractions. There has been no benefit demonstrated with continuous monitoring compared with intermittent monitoring.

What are the risks with ultrasound?
There are studies that have shown possible side effects of ultrasound including premature ovulation, preterm birth, dyslexia, delayed speech development, intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), damage to the nervous system, reduction in the rate of cell division, and less right handedness.

Ultrasound also causes an effect called cavitation where the small pockets of gas that exist in our tissue vibrates and then collapses. The effects of cavitation in human tissue are unknown at this time.

Since the routine use of ultrasound has been used for only 20 years, we have yet to find out what effects ultrasound will have on fetuses in the long term. Even the intensity of ultrasound has grown over time and so we will not find out long term effects on the babies of today until many years from now.

Because every fetus is different, they may have individual tolerances to the amount of ultrasound that they can be exposed to. A “safe” exposure of ultrasound to one fetus may be a very dangerous exposure to another especially in babies who may already have an impaired nervous system or predisposition to some of the other side effects listed previously.

Ultrasound is not associated with gross abnormalities such as mutation to the limbs, organs, brain, etc.

The FDA at this time has set limits on the maximum allowable exposure to ultrasound but these limits are based on exposure to soft tissue and not growing bones. They have not released any info stating that routine use of ultrasound is safe.

Other disadvantages of sonograms are false positives of fetal abnormalities and incorrect dating for due dates.


I/We have read the info that my midwife has provided on the use of ultrasound during my pregnancy and labor/birth and she has explained to us her preference to use fetascopes during pregnancy and a doppler during labor/birth.

I/We understand that there are many unknowns as far as how ultrasound can affect humans long term and we choose to give permission to use a doppler during labor/birth.
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#22 of 29 Old 01-10-2004, 04:56 AM
 
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Interesting....

I wonder about the ones they use in chiropractic offices too, to warm up the tissues. Probably the same sort of thing.

Well, thanks for the info. Is it legal to not be able to find a heartbeat, or I should say to not have a heartbeat recorded for every visit in case the paperwork needs to be looked over later? Do you have problems with fetoscopes yourself?

I guess I'd say I'm leaning toward not using one this time.
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#23 of 29 Old 01-10-2004, 05:29 AM
 
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Yeah, in fact they use ultrasound for carpal tunnel, because it does warm up the nerves, etc. It's the same type of technology that is used to measure vascular pressure and function.

You know, I'm not sure why we do prenatal heartbeats. I guess for some affirmation that the baby is there and alive. However, if mom is feeling lots of movement, why bother? Sometimes I wonder. I usually palpate belly first and most babies respond so playfully and are so active, hearing the heartbeat is almost just for the parents. Until late in pregnancy, when it's nice to know what your baby's particular baseline is, I wonder why we do it (however, I often wonder why we do most things....).

I have a few clients that only want the fetoscope prenatally. If I don't hear baby, I just chart that. No big deal. I also give my clients their own fetoscope to borrow from mid-preg to birth so they can listen on their own whenever they want. This helps when sometimes you want a bit of reassurance or want gramma to hear the heartbeat, etc.

There's no legal requirement really, although with my license, I'm supposed to listen to fetal heart tones. However, I'm also supposed to weigh clients and I don't believe in that.
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#24 of 29 Old 01-10-2004, 12:20 PM
 
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Hi there, just wanted to chime in my two lay, unscientific cents. First, the only articles I've seen even questioning the safety and benefits and necessity of ultrasound came from Peggy O'Mara. The Mothering article was mentioned earlier and then her recent pregnancy book. I've never heard anyone else, except my dh, even question them. It seems everyone gets one and proudly displays it! We are expecting #2 in two weeks and have never had one.

Also, we only used the fetoscope, except in labor and when I had some early 2nd trimester bleeding. It takes longer to hear the heartbeat, but I do usually feel movement and that's all I need to know baby is active and alive. So basically, no handheld until the baby is on it's way out.

Though when I had the bleeding, it was very reassuring to hear the baby. I was too freaked out to feel confident about the baby's movement b/c it had just started moving earlier that week.

Zia+Lane+Sonora=Mi Vida Loca! :
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#25 of 29 Old 01-10-2004, 04:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by pamamidwife
However, I'm also supposed to weigh clients and I don't believe in that.
Off topic...

I'm so happy to hear that a care provider is not obsessed with a woman's weight during pregnancy! Bless you!
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#26 of 29 Old 01-11-2004, 02:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by pamamidwife

Some placentas haVe multiple lobes - usually two. There can be Vessels running from the "main" placenta to the "satellite" placenta. This usually is an issue only with the birth of the placenta - where the satellite placenta remains in utero and oftentimes the exposed Vessels cause significant bleeding and hemorrhage. It sounds like, Mssgirl, that this is what you had - with the additional "bonus" (ugh! I cannot belieVe you went through that! how scary!) of haVing a true Vasa preVia oVer the cerVix because of this low-lying satellite placenta/lobe.

THanks so much pamamidwife!!! Yes I was considered a true "lab rat" during this pregnancy. Docs from all over Texas were being called on for consultation. My tests, reports and my placenta were all saved so they could
be studied.
But believe it or not, with all the potential scariness that could have happened....not one bad thing happened. My doc told me not to laugh, cough, have sex, strain to use the bathroom or pick up anything for the 7 months I knew about it or something catostrophic could happen. How'd you like to have THAT on your shoulders for that length of time (and have a toddler running around the house ).

I consider myself very lucky for sure!

Besides ds2 coming from the mess......my mom paid for me to have a cleaning service come to my house during that time!:LOL
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#27 of 29 Old 01-11-2004, 05:45 PM
 
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My cousin's first child has a severe neural tube defect that was detected by ultrasound. His spinal cord formed outside his body and in all likelihood (according to her ob and neurosurgeon) he would not have survived labor or a vaginal delivery.

He was born by scheduled C-section and underwent several surgeries very early on. He's of normal intelligence and uses a wheelchair and they're just very glad they had the opportunity to make choices that saved and enhanced his life.

We had ultrasounds with dd and ds (due early April) because I felt as though I wanted to see that their bodies and brains were intact and healthy. (Insofar as ultrasound can reveal this, of course!) Although I am technically not at much higher risk for a neural tube defect in my children, the family history gave me pause. For us, it was worth it. We've had one per kid, and that's my limit.

Can't give up actin' tough, it's all that I'm made of. Can't scrape together quite enough to ride the bus to the outskirts of the fact that I need love. ~ Neko Case

 
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#28 of 29 Old 01-12-2004, 01:42 AM
 
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I just wanted to add a thought. I am due to have babe #2 in February. With DS we had an ultrasound, he is fine. With this pregnancy I declined an ultrasound, now that I am a more informed Mama.
From what I have read routine ultrasounds(sonograms) have become the norm but are not documented anywhere that they are to be routine. The American guidlines have ultrasound used as testing if a problem is found or there is reason to believe there may be a problem. This is due to the fact that they really dont know the side effects of sonograms.
Now most OB's in my area are routinly giving womyn ultrasounds early on (8weeks I think) to determine due date, etc. All of that info can be found thru a palpation exam.
Just my thoughts. I really thought a lot about this at the beginning if this pregnancy and there is no supporrting data that says a low risk pregnancy should have one. Luckily with a midwife you dont have to fight your decisions.
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#29 of 29 Old 01-20-2004, 05:43 PM
 
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we had 5 ultasounds with baby #1
1 to detemine time of conception
2 couldn't find heartbeat (thankfully her butt was in the way!)
3 gender..no luck..butt again..
4 gender..its a girl!
5 position of the baby

talk about an u/s happy OB!

she came out perfect and is rarely sick....but thats just my experience....

this time we only got one...b/c I was huge at 8 wks and midwife had to r/o twins....but thats IT this time...we're not even gonna find out the gender!...can't wait!

~mama to some wonderful kids
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