Kate Hudson...baby too big??? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 55 Old 01-20-2004, 02:47 PM
 
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I can handle Kate Hudson having an unnecessary c-birth, but I hate to think of all the women out there reading these articles about celebrities and their "emergency" c-sections for their "gigantic" babies and believing that women are not made to birth babies, but surgeons are.

Unfortunately, celebrities have a huge influence on the general population, and we already know how educated the general public is already about birth. Ugh
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#32 of 55 Old 01-20-2004, 04:24 PM
 
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These "big babies" are getting smaller and smaller. It used to be a sign of health if a baby was 9-10 lbs, now it's considered abnormal and 8 lb babies are "big."

Some doctors even say that for a mom under 5 feet tall, 7 lbs is too big.
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#33 of 55 Old 01-20-2004, 04:36 PM
 
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I do know that Kathie Lee Gifford had the liposuction after her daughter was born. I watched the show after she returned (from maternity leave) and she was talking about after the OB was done (can't remember if she had a c/s), then the plastic surgeons came in, and did their work. I was like "wow! must be nice!!" Never really watched her after that, because she made me sick.

I do agree that most OB's put that thought in the mother's head about having a big baby. My friend was expecting #4, and her #3 had been almost 11 pounds. I think her #2 was 10 pounds. Anyway, both babies "got stuck", and had to be forced out with forceps or something. So, when she was going to have #4, the doctor measured the baby with u/s, and said this baby was going to be a whopper, and that she needed to schedule a c/s. She did, baby was born a healthy 8 pounds 6 ounces. :

My mom is 5'4" and weighs 120 at the most when pregnant. She had 7 natural deliveries (and 1 c/s in 1971 due to a stupid doctor, and then really blotched her scar...she should have sued, but it was a military doctor back in 1971. Had 6 naturals afterwards), and her #6 and #8 were both almost 10 pounds! Her smallest baby was #4 and she was 7 pounds 3 ounces! I think I was her next smallest at 7#12.
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#34 of 55 Old 01-20-2004, 04:53 PM
 
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Originally posted by Greaseball
These "big babies" are getting smaller and smaller. It used to be a sign of health if a baby was 9-10 lbs, now it's considered abnormal and 8 lb babies are "big."
I agree! My mom had 5 babies. I was the smallest and I weighed 8 lbs 9 oz. Her youngest was 10 lbs 5 oz. She never had a c-section. And she's only about 5'5" or so, if that. (can't remember her height exactly, lol, but she's not much taller than me!) I remember people commenting on how "big" my sister, the 10 lber was, but the others were just normal!
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#35 of 55 Old 01-20-2004, 05:26 PM
 
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So, when she was going to have #4, the doctor measured the baby with u/s, and said this baby was going to be a whopper, and that she needed to schedule a c/s. She did, baby was born a healthy 8 pounds 6 ounces.
I hear this a lot from moms, but the funny thing is they never seem too upset about it. They don't walk away feeling violated and like their lives were unnecessarily risked. I think it has to do with how all the risks are downplayed.
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#36 of 55 Old 01-20-2004, 05:29 PM
 
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Originally posted by doulamomvicki
I am going to let everyone in on a secret. When I worked in L&D we had quite a few local celebrity types deliver at our hosp. They would have their ob deliver the baby and then the plastic surgeon would step in to tip, tuck and close. It was all planned. Not one of these moms publically would say they had scheduled c/s for that reason, it was always "the baby was too big" or "I tried but was not progressing" and so on. My guess is that was the real reason for Kate's c/s.
I work L&D as a RN and one of the OB's who did her residency in LA said that all the stars come in for 4 week postpartum visits so they can get cleared for 6 week postpartum liposuction. That scares the heck outta me!
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#37 of 55 Old 01-20-2004, 05:35 PM
 
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Originally posted by applejuice
:All of you L&D nurses: how often are those scales in the delivery room calibrated?

Do doctors tell you to lie about the weight to gain and/or confirm the "lie" that the baby is too big for a vaginal delivery?
We use digital scales and I don't know how often they are calibrated. No way would a doctor ask a nurse to lie and even if they did, I doubt anyone would go along with it. Too much at risk - an honestly, the relationship between the OB's and nurses is that great. We tend to think that most of them are idiots. Truely. The doctors tend to come up with some idiotic reason to justify the c/sec - like "well, he was too big for YOU!" or "good thing we did this now, the placenta was deteriorating and the cord was around the neck!"

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With all of mine born at home, I know that those tired midwives were not all very careful about being precise with the weight. My youngest was weighed with a fishing scale. In three days at the pediatrician's office, there was a marked difference.
Yeah, my last hb baby weighed 8-12 a week after birth when the fish scale had called him 8-2 at birth. I thought he looked bigger than that and I'm generally a pretty good guess!
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#38 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 01:29 AM
 
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Tonight when I was in the supermarket check-out I skimmed through an article about Kate. Apparently she "desperately wanted a natural birth."

In the pictures she looked like a normal pregnant woman too, not like most celebrities who remain a size 2 everywhere but their bellies.
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#39 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 02:38 AM
 
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Originally posted by blueviolet
Tonight when I was in the supermarket check-out I skimmed through an article about Kate. Apparently she "desperately wanted a natural birth."
I had read earlier that she was planning a waterbirth. That is some drastic change of plans....
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#40 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 03:41 AM
 
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Alittle T

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Originally posted by Mom2six
... No way would a doctor ask a nurse to lie and even if they did, I doubt anyone would go along with it. Too much at risk - an honestly, the relationship between the OB's and nurses is that great. We tend to think that most of them are idiots. Truely.
Have you ever seen the 1982 movie "Malpractice" starring Paul Newman? It is about just that; a woman becomes a vegetable at the hands of an experienced OB in a classy hospital after a doctor tells the OB nurse to lie about the hours sinc e the patient ate. She was given gas during labor and aspirated her own vomit. She told them it had been an hour since she ate, but the nurse was told to change the 1 to a 9. The nurse lost her job, but the doctor was still there.

That is as I recall it anyway.

"The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie, deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive and unrealistic."
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#41 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 03:44 AM
 
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No comment. Im letting the smiley speak for itself.
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#42 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 05:42 AM
 
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I think that the quickie tummy-tuck is more likely, though. How else do you explain the way celbrity moms don't seem to have a post-partum chubby period like the rest of us?
I'm hoping that you wouldn't assume us non-celeb mommies that didn't have a post-partum chubby peroid as being c-section-tummy-tuck freaks!
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#43 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 11:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by applejuice
Have you ever seen the 1982 movie "Malpractice" starring Paul Newman? It is about just that; a woman becomes a vegetable at the hands of an experienced OB in a classy hospital after a doctor tells the OB nurse to lie about the hours sinc e the patient ate. She was given gas during labor and aspirated her own vomit. She told them it had been an hour since she ate, but the nurse was told to change the 1 to a 9. The nurse lost her job, but the doctor was still there.
Yes, I saw the movie YEARS ago, but that is basically how I remember it. Might I remind you of two things - 1) that was a MOVIE and 2) nurse/doctor relationships have changed *emensely* in the past 25 years. I'm not saying it could never happen, but at least in my experience it would be HIGHLY unlikely.

Editted to ad: Now that I think back on this movie, the scenario really bugs me. It plays into all those "aspiration" fears about eating in labor. A woman can aspirate 1 hour or 9 hours after eating, so the real person who would be at fault here would be - the ANESTHISOLOGIST who intubated her improperly allowing her to aspirate!!!!
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#44 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 01:27 PM
 
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I'm sure anyone here who has worked in a hospital knows the nurse's first duty is to obey the doctor. Asking questions is not allowed.

I know there are "exceptions" but those are probably as rare as true cases of CPD.
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#45 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 01:50 PM
 
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I'm sure anyone here who has worked in a hospital knows the nurse's first duty is to obey the doctor. Asking questions is not allowed.
Um, i work in a hospital, as a nurse, and i do follow doctors orders. Questions are allowed. i am a patient advocate first and foremost. My priority is my patient, not the doctors feelings. Please do not assume that nurses dont question doctors orders.
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I know there are "exceptions" but those are probably as rare as true cases of CPD.
I respectfully disagree. This angers me that people just assume that nurses are obedient robots without a voice. There isnt one single nurse i know of personally that hasnt questioned a doctor. It wouldnt be safe. dictors arent God, they are mere men (and women!).

Please dont lump us all in and broadly generalize. because you're wrong.

FTR, of all the births i have witnessed, including c-sections, i have never seen a nurse lie about the weight, and i have never heard a doctor ask either.
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#46 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 04:07 PM
 
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My priority is my patient, not the doctors feelings. Please do not assume that nurses dont question doctors orders.
I probably spoke too soon. Of course there are good, compassionate nurses who care about their patients. But have you been in the middle of a doctor/patient conflict? Have you been able to "side" with the patient without fear of angering the doctor or losing your job? Have you been able to advocate for a patient's choice, even if it was a choice that would inconvenience the doctor?

I have never been a nurse, I have just worked around them and doctors (in a mental hospital) and it really does look like the doctor is the one in charge. Other nurses tell me they are responsible for 90% of the patient's care, but get to make none of the decisions.
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#47 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 04:15 PM
 
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Originally posted by Greaseball
I'm sure anyone here who has worked in a hospital knows the nurse's first duty is to obey the doctor. Asking questions is not allowed.

I know there are "exceptions" but those are probably as rare as true cases of CPD.
WHOA. Nurse who works in hospital here. This is such a GROSS distortion that I'm not even sure where to begin. Nurses carry their own license and that license can be REVOKED for NOT questioning doctors orders that are in error.

I work in L&D. No, I do not get to choose who gets induced and for what bogus reason (they tell me it's 'large for gestational age' I don't get to say "hey, I don't think the baby is that big" b/c I'm not licensed to make that decision). I don't get to order medications ("hmmm - I think she needs dopamine, not pitocin!"). But if a MD orders something that is in violation of protocol or safe practice you better believe I am going to question and REFUSE to follow it b/c it's my ass and license that will be on the line. We have been told repeatedly sense nursing school "I was just following the doctors orders" is no defense and will *not* stand up in court. And yes, I have done this. We have an "old fart" group of doctors that like to make up pitocin orders that don't follow protocol - I not sure why they do, b/c there is not one nurse on the floor that will follow them and we always tell them "if you would like to do that, you'll have to come in and do it yourself".

In case you couldn't tell - I'm offended.
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#48 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 04:18 PM
 
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Originally posted by Greaseball
IBut have you been in the middle of a doctor/patient conflict? Have you been able to "side" with the patient without fear of angering the doctor or losing your job? Have you been able to advocate for a patient's choice, even if it was a choice that would inconvenience the doctor?
Um, yes and yes. You better believe it. Even to the point of angering the doctor. You get it yet?
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#49 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 05:33 PM
 
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But have you been in the middle of a doctor/patient conflict? Have you been able to "side" with the patient without fear of angering the doctor or losing your job
Yes to both. Again, doctors are not God. They can and do make mistakes, and if i do what they say and make an error, i am as much at fault as he.
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Have you been able to advocate for a patient's choice, even if it was a choice that would inconvenience the doctor?
Absolutely. Many times. I even had one time where i directly questioned the doctors ethics to his face.
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I have never been a nurse
Then please, dont broadly generalize and criticize something you are not directly involved with. Being in the perimeters of the medical field does not make you an authority. and you could very well be missing the real nurse~doctor dynamics.
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it really does look like the doctor is the one in charge
Techinically, you are correct. The doctor is the one "managing" and "directing" the patients course in a hospital. However, it is the nurses that see if such course is in fact working, not working, and has a direct impact on the outcome.
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#50 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 05:37 PM
 
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I'm an idiot! Maybe I read too much.
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#51 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 05:45 PM
 
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Sweetbaby3 and Mom2six, as a fellow l&d nurse thank you! We are not mindless drones. I have never lied on my charting and frankly I feel if anything we are in a postion to protect and advocate for our patients. Especially the most vulnerable ones.
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#52 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 06:44 PM
 
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During transports, nurses are either our greatest allies or our greatest enemies. I have a HUGE amount of respect for what they do, and I've had so many nurses go BEYOND the call of duty to help my clients achieve what they want.

In my eyes, they are truly UNSUNG heroes that should be getting paid a hell of a lot more.
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#53 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 06:54 PM
 
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It's funny, a while ago one of those "career track" tests said I would be better at nursing than any other profession. But that was when I was in the police academy, so I was quite different back then!
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#54 of 55 Old 01-22-2004, 06:55 PM
 
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I'm an idiot
Nah, just passionate.
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#55 of 55 Old 01-23-2004, 05:20 PM
 
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"No, I do not get to choose who gets induced and for what bogus reason (they tell me it's 'large for gestational age' I don't get to say "hey, I don't think the baby is that big" b/c I'm not licensed to make that decision). I don't get to order medications ("hmmm - I think she needs dopamine, not pitocin!")."

This is the kind of thing that I assumed Greaseball was talking about. You might very well see that induction is not the best course of action, for instance, but for you to argue about it isn't going to change anything, right? Of course that's a very different thing than saying that nurses cannot ask questions and cannot disagree, which of course is not literally true (though I assume some doctors like to discourage it.)

I keep mentioning this book, Hard Labor, by Susan Diamond, sorry, but it keeps on being relevant. Have any of you nurses read it? What did you think of it? Some of the stories she tells of abuses by doctors, and nurses being afraid to speak up about them, are just shocking. Well, to me. So, I guess my question is, is this unusual or common? How often do you see things that you disagree with but feel that you can't or shouldn't say anything? If not often, do you feel you work in especially progressive hospitals?
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