Hospital pain charts - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 31 Old 05-27-2009, 07:18 PM - Thread Starter
 
JamieCatheryn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: SW Pa
Posts: 5,095
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 16 Post(s)
You know those pain charts with the faces and/or descriptions of levels of pain, say 0-10 scale or something? They're made to help patients communicate their need for pain drugs I think. Looking back, in my hospital birth with DS (#1) those were very counterproductive to me. They seemed to tell me how I ought to behave if my contractions were high in intensity: thrashing about, screaming, stuff like that. I was really suggestible at the time and they fed my out of control feelings and suffering during transition. I seem to be going into labor soon, maybe, I hope, with my second. I'm having some contractions that I was just thinking are like a 2 in intensity. I just sketched an intensity chart to mentally replace that pain and panic nonsense: low in intensity there's a happy face with open eyes, at a 5 a closed eyes and relaxed face, high up there's a closed eyes and a little strained/concentrating face. The notes are about how much progress that kind of intensity of contractions may be making (harder contractions, more progress), and what I need to do (work with it, hang on and let it happen).

Anybody else see those charts in labor and let them work their way too much into your consciousness? What do y'all think of this rating the intensity not the pain thing? And the mindset that more intensity is good, it can do the work needed faster?
JamieCatheryn is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 31 Old 05-27-2009, 07:54 PM
 
by-the-lake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Northern Wisconsin
Posts: 1,134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Very interesting! I am a Labor/Delivery RN. On admission, we HAVE to introduce the pain scale, as per regulation guidelines. During labor, I don't ever use it!!! Its just dumb, dumb, dumb. We should never tell women how they should feel/act! You are right, its too suggestible. And its subjective. Lots of us nurses never use it. Ignore it. Do not focus on it! Anyhow, I would suggest when you go to the hospital, tell every labor nurse if nessecary, not to ask or show you the charts. Tell them the pain scale is not accurate for you. Not sure if I answered your question, hope I helped.

Wife to DHluxlove.gif DS 98thumb.gif DD 03flower.gif DS 09 babyf.gifwinner.jpgcd.gifnovaxnocirc.gif

She is here!!! Oct 5th!!!joy.gif

 

by-the-lake is offline  
#3 of 31 Old 05-27-2009, 11:32 PM
 
kltroy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,136
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I remember being read my "patient bill of rights" when I was in labor with my daughter. The L&D nurse, who was great and very supportive of natural birth, actually said "you have a right to a pain free birth". Both my mom and I busted out laughing and said, "are you KIDDING?" I still think it's so warped that women have a "right" to an epidural.

Mom to James (ribboncesarean.gif 5/2006), Claire (vbac.gif 6/2008), furry kitties Calvin and Bob, and wife to Dennis. 

kltroy is offline  
#4 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 12:30 AM
 
MamaMem's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 301
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 7 Post(s)
I would love to see a picture of your chart. I don't remember seei it when I was in labor last time but the idea of your intensity thing is inspiring me... It could be used as an "inspiration" poster. Making the faces relaxed could be just as suggestible but toward a different end. ??

What pregnancy does to my head: dizzy.gif
What new babies do for my heart:   treehugger.gif

MamaMem is offline  
#5 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 01:06 AM
 
katelove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 3,939
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 1 Thread(s)
Quoted: 35 Post(s)
I think your alternative is a great idea. I love the paradigm shift form pain = bad to intensity = good/progress/getting closer to goal.

I'd be interested to know how many people have had the experience of using them in labour. I have never heard of any type of pain scale being used during labour in Australia. I have certainly never used one when assessing a labouring woman. I guess our rationale for that is that pain and contraction intensity are not necessarily related and we will gain more information from palpating contractions to assess their strength.

To avoid any negativity asociated with the Wong-Baker faces scale you could ask your care providers to use a numeric scale. The most common one over here is a scale of zero to ten with zero being no pain and ten being the worst pain imaginable. This is the one we use most commonly for adults. The W-B faces tend to be used more for young children and adults who are unable to use the numeric scale. Both are validated pain assessment tools but the number one might eliminate some of the problems the OP has identified and is also easier to use IMO because you don't need to have a chart available.

Mother of two spectacular girls, born mid-2010 and late 2012  mdcblog5.gif

katelove is online now  
#6 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 03:40 AM
 
SalmonBayDoula's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Seattle
Posts: 621
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Here is a link to a chart ( I have seen them go 0-10)

Wong Baker Scale

As an aside, I recommend to clients that when health care providers are suggesting interventions or are concerned about things deviating from normal, asking them to use the same scale to demonstrate their level of concern about the issue is a clear way of understanding the risks they are trying to represent.

Sharon

Birth doula, doula trainer, ican leader, lamaze childbirth educator, and most importantly, mom of 2 great girls!
SalmonBayDoula is offline  
#7 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 01:58 PM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 25,599
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I've never really laboured in the hospital for very long, and don't know if the local hospital uses the scales during labour or not. They do use them post-op with a c-section, and hate them with a passion. Unfortunately, I'm of a personality type that copes best by being left the hell alone. I don't want people offering me drugs - if I want them, I'll ask. Same for breastfeeding advice. Just leave me alone. I can't stand being bugged about how much pain I'm in or not in. The scale is subjective. I have no idea what a "10" would even feel like...post-op with Aaron?...the time I tore my ACL?...worse? I don't know, and trying to figure out where my pain fits on some stupid scale just annoys me.

I'm sure they must have some kind of benefit, as they've become so widespread, but they drive me crazy.

OP: I'm actually glad you posted. I'd forgotten about them, and I'm going back in for another c-section in four weeks. At least now, I'm prepared for them to pull out the chart and talk to me like I'm four. (What is it about the nursing profession that causes so many of them - not all, but a lot - to talk to patients as if we're not-too-bright little kids?)

Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#8 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 02:00 PM
 
Belle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Vancouver, (Not BC) WA (Not DC)
Posts: 2,933
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
During my hospital birth with Dd1 they never asked me my pain level during labor. The nurse initial asked me what I wanted for pain relief and then encouraged me to use the tub after I said I didn't want drugs. I was really lucky to have awesome nurses during her birth. I can't speak highly enough about them.

After the birth one of the nurses brought out the pain level chart and asked me about it. I thought they were asking my level of pain during the labor and said labor was a 6. She said she was asking how I felt now. I said 2. She told me it was a pleasure to be present for my baby's birth. If I could guarantee that I would have nurses like that I wouldn't mind giving birth in a hospital again. Unfortunately I can't so I'll just give birth at home.

Heather Mike Married 8/1/99 Mom to Charlotte Aug 04, Nov 06, and Katherine Oct 07
Belle is offline  
#9 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 02:08 PM
 
Sasharna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 845
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belle View Post
During my hospital birth with Dd1 they never asked me my pain level during labor. The nurse initial asked me what I wanted for pain relief and then encouraged me to use the tub after I said I didn't want drugs. I was really lucky to have awesome nurses during her birth. I can't speak highly enough about them.
Sounds like my last birth.

I told my nurse on admission that I would be using hypnosis. She was very experienced and understood that this meant I would not like to talk much about pain. She did not once ask me what my pain scale number would be.

My first birth? Totally different. They pestered me with that darned scale the whole time.

OP, I like your idea. I think many women would find it helpful.

Gallifreyan nerdfighter :, doting partner to the sasquatch , mama to the boss : (10/05) and the new little one (4/14/09). :: and hoping to :
Sasharna is offline  
#10 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 06:07 PM
 
Mamabeakley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: In the labyrinth
Posts: 2,080
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I took a picture with my cell phone at one birth I was at of the pain chart on the wall. The part that got me was 7 = Too Much (5 = moderate, 8 = severe). Come on! I mean, what if you don't think 7 is too much? I'm sure I was at at least a 7 or 8 on my own personal 0 - 10 pain scale at points (much of) both my labors, but it wasn't too much, it was just the way it was.

I suspect that what that means is that the staff who work in that hospital consider a pain experience of 7 to be "too much" and something they would like to be able to fix for their patients. Unfortunately, that doesn't take into account those laboring women who do not WANT their pain fixed.

Here as mama to W (2/04), R (5/06), D (7/09), and J (12/9/12!), co-parenting with my DH

I WOH part-time, am a doula & childbirth educator, home/unschool, and hope we are nearing the center of chaos


 
  

Mamabeakley is offline  
#11 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 06:20 PM
 
Honey693's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3,086
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belle View Post
During my hospital birth with Dd1 they never asked me my pain level during labor. The nurse initial asked me what I wanted for pain relief and then encouraged me to use the tub after I said I didn't want drugs. I was really lucky to have awesome nurses during her birth. I can't speak highly enough about them.
This was how mine was too. Thank goodness b/c I hate those pain faces.

My mom is a nurse on an ortho floor and they're supposed to use them, but she said they're pretty useless so she just asks people if their pain is manageable or something along those lines.

obstruct livery vehicles

Honey693 is offline  
#12 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 06:31 PM
 
AlexisT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central PA
Posts: 2,208
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kltroy View Post
I remember being read my "patient bill of rights" when I was in labor with my daughter. The L&D nurse, who was great and very supportive of natural birth, actually said "you have a right to a pain free birth". Both my mom and I busted out laughing and said, "are you KIDDING?" I still think it's so warped that women have a "right" to an epidural.
I don't at all. It is a right to give birth without pain if THAT'S WHAT YOU CHOOSE. I have a friend whose local hospital (non-US) would not give epidural for normal vaginal births. She suffered terribly (and wound up with a C/S anyway because she was so exhausted she couldn't go on).

Pain relief is your right--to choose or decline. It should never be a decision made by your HCPs.

DD 01/2007, DS 09/2011

AlexisT is offline  
#13 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 06:41 PM
 
MegBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 2,063
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mamabeakley View Post
I suspect that what that means is that the staff who work in that hospital consider a pain experience of 7 to be "too much" and something they would like to be able to fix for their patients. Unfortunately, that doesn't take into account those laboring women who do not WANT their pain fixed.
EXACTLY! I think you hit the nail on the head here! I'm sitting here reading
Quote:
Originally Posted by by-the-lake View Post
Very interesting! I am a Labor/Delivery RN. On admission, we HAVE to introduce the pain scale, as per regulation guidelines.
and

But why??? It's not as though any woman laboring in the hospital is really unaware of the fact that there are drugs that could help her! I think if a laboring woman wants some sort of phramacological pain relief, she'll speak up! Is it really that vital to solicit a pain rating?
MegBoz is offline  
#14 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 06:46 PM
 
MegBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 2,063
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexisT View Post
It is a right to give birth without pain if THAT'S WHAT YOU CHOOSE. ..Pain relief is your right--to choose or decline. It should never be a decision made by your HCPs.
I get what you're saying here, but to phrase it that "You have a right to a pain-free birth" is a little silly. I don't know from personal experience, but just having an epidural started can be painful! Sitting still through a ctrx to get it done is certainly painful. So to say "pain-free" seems a bit extreme.

But really, I am annoyed by that statement because American women don't have a "right" to a natural birth in most American hospitals!! I'm beyond furious at the atrocious state of American maternity care. The fact that those of us simply wanting to birth normally and naturally have to FIGHT SO HARD to get it... (I could list out the details of what I mean here, but I think all on MDC know what I'm talking about) but yet we have a "right" to a "pain-free" birth - it's a touch infuriating.... that's all.

But I do agree - having an epidural should be Mama's choice.
MegBoz is offline  
#15 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 06:53 PM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 25,599
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlexisT View Post
I don't at all. It is a right to give birth without pain if THAT'S WHAT YOU CHOOSE. I have a friend whose local hospital (non-US) would not give epidural for normal vaginal births. She suffered terribly (and wound up with a C/S anyway because she was so exhausted she couldn't go on).

Pain relief is your right--to choose or decline. It should never be a decision made by your HCPs.
You have a right to try to have a pain-free birth, maybe. Epis don't always work, and the stories I've heard from women with full pain relief on one side, and no relief on the other (and various other kinds of "windows") sound every bit as bad as no pain relief at all. The "right to a pain-free birth" stuff just sounds like more of the same...the medical profession promising what they can't necessarily deliver.

Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#16 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 09:19 PM
 
PoppyMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: In my own delusions.
Posts: 3,126
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by kltroy View Post
I remember being read my "patient bill of rights" when I was in labor with my daughter. The L&D nurse, who was great and very supportive of natural birth, actually said "you have a right to a pain free birth". Both my mom and I busted out laughing and said, "are you KIDDING?" I still think it's so warped that women have a "right" to an epidural.
I understand what irritates y'all about this but it's actually very important. Anesthesiologists are extremely expensive and if women weren't given "this right" women with poor or no insurance could be forced to birth without the option of drug pain relief. That is fine as a choice but should never be something you are forced to go without because of financial issues.
PoppyMama is offline  
#17 of 31 Old 05-28-2009, 11:18 PM
 
kltroy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,136
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I agree upon reflection that it probably is a good thing to put out there for everyone to know. It's just that the idea struck me as very silly at the time. What's too bad is that women don't also have a "right" to some excellent professional and readily available labor support so that they can avoid the epidural if they want to.

I just talked to a student of mine who is planning to go to medical school and is from Pakistan, and she actually said (when I asked her why she wanted to be a doctor) that she was in the hospital with her grandfather several years ago and there was a person who needed emergency surgery but they wouldn't operate on him because his family couldn't pay. I am thankful that this is not the situation in the United States, but this anecdote, more than anything, reminds me that it probably *is* important to let people know that it is ok to ask for pain relief.

Mom to James (ribboncesarean.gif 5/2006), Claire (vbac.gif 6/2008), furry kitties Calvin and Bob, and wife to Dennis. 

kltroy is offline  
#18 of 31 Old 05-29-2009, 07:40 PM
 
by-the-lake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Northern Wisconsin
Posts: 1,134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MegBoz View Post
EXACTLY! I think you hit the nail on the head here! I'm sitting here reading


and

But why??? It's not as though any woman laboring in the hospital is really unaware of the fact that there are drugs that could help her! I think if a laboring woman wants some sort of phramacological pain relief, she'll speak up! Is it really that vital to solicit a pain rating?

Unfourtanatly, yes. We are goverened by JCHAO, which is an accerditation. Without this accreditiation, hospitals lose vital govermnet funding. Because they hold these cards, there are regulations someone in an office dreams up, and they have to be followed. To 'prove' they are followed, the introduction of the pain scale, (and many other assesssment tools) needs to to charted on, and patient audits are done. So, if this is not done, this can be punitive to both the nurse and the department, and then the hospital.

Not all women are the same and will speak up if she wants pain relief. There are varying degrees of what people want/think out there.

Wife to DHluxlove.gif DS 98thumb.gif DD 03flower.gif DS 09 babyf.gifwinner.jpgcd.gifnovaxnocirc.gif

She is here!!! Oct 5th!!!joy.gif

 

by-the-lake is offline  
#19 of 31 Old 05-29-2009, 08:09 PM
 
mjg013's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 256
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The pain scale always irritates me. When I'm in pain asking for help I don't want to have to quantify that to someone. They don't just use it for labor though, they also ask me that when I go to the ER. I've been for gallbladder attacks and an appendicitis as well as congestive heart failure and was asked that every time. The appendicitis definitely took the number 10 spot. But when I'm lying there semi-conscious in a fetal position moaning and puking you would think they wouldn't need to ask how much pain I'm in.
mjg013 is offline  
#20 of 31 Old 05-29-2009, 09:09 PM
 
by-the-lake's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Northern Wisconsin
Posts: 1,134
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mjg013 View Post
The pain scale always irritates me. When I'm in pain asking for help I don't want to have to quantify that to someone. They don't just use it for labor though, they also ask me that when I go to the ER. I've been for gallbladder attacks and an appendicitis as well as congestive heart failure and was asked that every time. The appendicitis definitely took the number 10 spot. But when I'm lying there semi-conscious in a fetal position moaning and puking you would think they wouldn't need to ask how much pain I'm in.
:

Wife to DHluxlove.gif DS 98thumb.gif DD 03flower.gif DS 09 babyf.gifwinner.jpgcd.gifnovaxnocirc.gif

She is here!!! Oct 5th!!!joy.gif

 

by-the-lake is offline  
#21 of 31 Old 05-29-2009, 09:58 PM
 
not now's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 700
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The faces are for people who are unable to communicate appropriately and for children. Patients can point to the picture to communicate how much pain they are in. Pain is subjective so the nurse is to rely only on what the patient rates the pain at, if they cannot then the nurse moves to non-verbal cues.

I have patients tell me all the time that their pain is a 9 and they are laying still in bed watching TV with the lights on. If they say it's a 9, I have to treat it like a 9.
not now is offline  
#22 of 31 Old 05-29-2009, 11:54 PM
 
KristyDi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: The 'burbs of Atlanta
Posts: 2,681
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Storm Bride View Post
...Unfortunately, I'm of a personality type that copes best by being left the hell alone. I don't want people offering me drugs - if I want them, I'll ask. Same for breastfeeding advice. Just leave me alone. I can't stand being bugged about how much pain I'm in or not in. The scale is subjective. I have no idea what a "10" would even feel like...post-op with Aaron?...the time I tore my ACL?...worse? I don't know, and trying to figure out where my pain fits on some stupid scale just annoys me.

I'm sure they must have some kind of benefit, as they've become so widespread, but they drive me crazy.
: That's very much how I feel.

I hate that thing. What's a 1? a paper cut? a jammed finger? how much space is between the numbers? If I'm hurting I don't need to be trying to figure this crap out. I usually just pick a 4 or 5 cause they're in the middle.

The faces just annoy me. I'm an adult. Unless I'm non-verbal for some reason, I'll use my words.

Kristy, wife to Josh proud mama to Katie: since 3/08 and Emma since 8/12.

KristyDi is offline  
#23 of 31 Old 05-30-2009, 02:01 AM
 
not now's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 700
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
You don't have to use the faces. There is one scale with numbers and faces so staff isn't hunting around for whatever chart is needed. One chart with both numbers and faces hung in every room that's the way it has to be. We're not trying to treat patients like children we're trying to comply with all the red tape.

As for asking a patient frequently what the pain level is and if an intervention is desired: it's policy for hospitals on all units. I have to ask a patient every time vitals are taken, every time I'm in the room and during initial assessment. If they are in any pain I have to ask what the level is and the location. I also have to chart every time I asked and what the patients response was, even if it was 0 or they were sleeping. Why? Because during surveys patients complained that their nurse never asked if they were in pain or if they wanted pain medication. Now we have to overdo it. I've seen the complaints, it happened to every floor, even L&D.

I don't know any nurse who enjoys using the faces/numbers scale but it's what we have to do to comply with Joint Commission. My charting is reviewed by other nurses and it is reported to my boss if I don't comply.
not now is offline  
#24 of 31 Old 05-30-2009, 02:57 PM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 25,599
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by KristyDi View Post
I hate that thing. What's a 1? a paper cut? a jammed finger? how much space is between the numbers? If I'm hurting I don't need to be trying to figure this crap out. I usually just pick a 4 or 5 cause they're in the middle.
That's what I do, too.


not now: That's got to suck. Is there a reason why people didn't/don't ask for pain meds, if they want them?

As for the "we're not trying to treat patients like children" thing...I never said that all nurses do it, but what I'm talking about goes way beyond trying to comply to red tape. Is there any regulation, anywhere, requiring a nurse to pack pillows in around a breastfeeding mother who has already verbally declined an offer to do so? Any regulation requiring a nurse to break a baby's perfect latch, resulting in giving the mom a cracked nipple (that got infected) by messing around after being told "no thanks, we're fine"? Any regulation requiring a nurse to "suggest" the football hold to a c-section mom every time the nurses enters the room when she's already clearly told said nurse every time that she has tried it, and she doesn't like it? The pain scale is just one more annoying aspect to being stuck in the hospital...but the patronizing crap from nurses goes way beyond any necessity to comply with red tape. It's very frustrating to be stuck in a hospital because you're recovering from surgery, and have almost every member of the staff (every visit, there's one who doesn't suck) spend the whole time treating you like you're an infant and don't have a clue about caring for an infant. I'm not there for parenting or nursing instruction. I'm there, because I've had surgery...if I hadn't had surgery, I'd be at home.

Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#25 of 31 Old 05-31-2009, 12:10 AM
 
filiadeluna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 3,231
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was never shown a chart, or faces, but I do remember being asked this about a million times in the hospital. Ugh. That was SOOO irritating, and really did not help me to *not* focus on the pain. I remember the last time they asked me how bad it was, on a scale from 0-10, and I said, very loudly, "THIRTEEN!!!". The nurse responded rather snarkily, "There is no 13, what would it be from 0-10?", to which I very firmly said, "TEN then!" :

I had completely forgotten about that until reading this thread. It's amazing how you forget some of the little details when you're in such a long, painful, drawn-out, pitocin-induced labor. It's also amazing some of the things you will never forget.

-
filiadeluna is offline  
#26 of 31 Old 05-31-2009, 12:24 AM
 
leafwood's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: New York
Posts: 2,941
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
they never asked me w/ my first b/c i went in scared out of my mind and begging for an epi (huge mistake, but we do what we can in the moment). with ds, the nurse asked me to tell her a number 1-10 to describe my pain, i said, "at what number will you suggest drugs". she said, "4". mentally, i put 4 as my top mark and told her i was at a 2. she thought it was a hoot, they never asked me again.

Happy Mommy to one amazing girl (6y) and one sweet boy (2y), and wife to DH since 7/03 : :
leafwood is offline  
#27 of 31 Old 05-31-2009, 12:50 AM
 
not now's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Posts: 700
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
The problem lies with people who don't ask for things (whatever the reason may be) so we end up overdoing it with patients that don't ask for much. I used to totally be that nurse that left patients alone until it bit me in the butt, multiple times in the form of complaints. Patients who said they didn't need anything from me complaining to my manager that I never met any of their needs. I didn't ask if they were in pain, I didn't make them comfortable, I didn't provide options for positioning, I didn't ask if they wanted a bath after they refused the first time I asked....In the nursing world it's a lot of CYA (cover your a**) so now I have to be "proactive" and over do it for everyone. I am required to walk in a room every hour and ask the same five questions every.single.time. I'm required to reiterate education to patients that have already heard it from two nurses before me. Simply to cover my butt and the hospital. So yeah, it's a lot of hoop jumping for us.

Then, there are nurses who just don't know when to back off and shut up.
not now is offline  
#28 of 31 Old 05-31-2009, 05:59 PM
 
Storm Bride's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 25,599
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I guess I see a big difference between not wanting a bath at one time, and wanting a bath later, and not wanting pillows packed in around you while you're nursing, yk? The thing I'm referring to literally went:

Nurse: Oh - you're sitting up. That's great. But, you'd be more comfortable with some pillows.

Me: No, thank you. I'm fine like this. I don't really like pillows.

Nurse: Being piling pillows around me, while I say "no, thank you" two or three more times.

My entire visit was like that. I honestly felt like hitting someone. I don't really want to be offered the pillows at all (I was roasting in a west-facing window at the end of July), but I know it's part of their job. I don't get pushing it like that, yk? And, honestly, ime, it's more nurses who do it than don't.

Mind you, I'm boggled by how many patients complain about things. If I did want something, I'd ask for it...not that it's ever done me any good, but I'd ask. I just wish they'd take no for an answer, especially when it's about comfort issues and such, not medical stuff.

Lisa, lucky mama of Kelly (3/93) ribboncesarean.gif, Emma (5/03) ribboncesarean.gif, Evan (7/05) ribboncesarean.gif, & Jenna (6/09) ribboncesarean.gif
Loving my amazing dh, James & forever missing ribbonpb.gif Aaron Ambrose ribboncesarean.gif (11/07) ribbonpb.gif

Storm Bride is offline  
#29 of 31 Old 06-01-2009, 12:05 AM
 
gemasita's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Apex, NC
Posts: 1,491
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think these pain charts are a perfect example of how we take models of care that work in the rest of the hospital (on sick/injured patients) and apply it to the L&D section of the hospital. These charts were made for patients who are sick/injured because if you have just had surgery, they need to know if you are in pain to be able to control that after surgery. Surgery is not natural. They didn't invent those charts for laboring women - they just transplanted the tools they already use in the rest of the hospital to L&D. Having a baby is completely different that anything else happening in that hospital. Same with IV's, etc. When do you go to the hospital and not need an IV? When you are giving birth is probably the only time you are admitted to the hospital but don't need one (again, think of going in to have surgery, etc) but that practice is done at many hospitals in the L&D dept upon admission.

Jamie, DW to Jeff, birth and postpartum doula and Hypnobabies instructor.
4 years and 5 IVF cycles in the making, Elliott was born at home in water on 2/2/11.
gemasita is offline  
#30 of 31 Old 06-01-2009, 06:26 PM
 
MegBoz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Baltimore, MD
Posts: 2,063
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by not now View Post
am required to walk in a room every hour and ask the same five questions every.single.time. I'm required to reiterate education to patients that have already heard it from two nurses before me.
Would you still do that for L&D patients who had on their birth plan, in bold red font, "We would NOT like pain medication offered unless we specifically ask for it."?

Man, I'm SO GLAD I did all my laboring at home (by accident) & that DH is now on-board for HB for #2. Interruptions alone would drive me bonkers, but being repeatedly asked about the pain I'm trying to not foucs on? I'd probably slug someone... :
MegBoz is offline  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off