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#61 of 65 Old 11-24-2009, 12:44 AM
 
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Yep, you can only have O and Neg genes - if you had an A and a Pos gene, you'd be A and Pos, since those genes are dominant.

You still can't assume that your DH is AA, unfortunately. One of his parents could still have been carrying the O gene, which wouldn't show up, since it's recessive, and he could still have an AO blood type (effectively A, but it means that your children could still possibly end up getting the O gene from him, and then they would be O). Since neither of his parents was O, the chances are better that he's AA, but you can't tell for absolutely certain.

You can assume that he's +-, yes. And your figuring did still come out right, so none of the rest of it really matters except for interest's sake.

Unfortunately all I know about the ABO incompatibility stuff is what I've read in this thread. I'm A, so it doesn't help me - but it's certainly interesting.
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#62 of 65 Old 11-24-2009, 12:50 AM
 
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Puppies, Do you mean Duffy antibodies? That's another antibody issue, aside from the Rh stuff.

Quote:
You still can't assume that your DH is AA, unfortunately. One of his parents could still have been carrying the O gene, which wouldn't show up, since it's recessive, and he could still have an AO blood type (effectively A, but it means that your children could still possibly end up getting the O gene from him, and then they would be O). Since neither of his parents was O, the chances are better that he's AA, but you can't tell for absolutely certain.
Yup, my DH is B+, yet our daughter is O+. You never know how the genetics will play out. He also has siblings who are B-, O-, and O+. Lots of variation there.

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#63 of 65 Old 11-24-2009, 01:26 AM
 
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Du FACTOR (Duffy factor)

The Du factor is related to the Rh group of blood factors. It is important because in cases where the Rh group is missing (Rh-), the Du factor is sometimes present. In such situations, the Du factor usually compensates for the lack of other Rh factors and causes the blood stream to respond as if it where Rh+. Such cases would be reported as Rh- Du+. These women are RARELY at risk for Rh problems and are most often treated as if Rh+ (except with a transfusion).


that is probably too much to quote, but I've done it

I don't really understand how it applies, except that it means that whoever has it doesn't have to worry about RH incompatibility!
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#64 of 65 Old 11-24-2009, 02:46 AM
 
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I think we're talking about different antigens...here is the one I was referring to:

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/974349-overview

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Although the Rh antibody was and still is the most common cause of severe hemolytic disease of the newborn, other alloimmune antibodies belonging to Kell (K and k), Duffy (Fya), Kidd (Jka and Jkb), and MNSs (M, N, S, and s) systems do cause severe hemolytic disease of the newborn.3
And from that same article:

Quote:
The risk of Rh immunization after the delivery of the first child to a nulliparous Rh-negative mother is 16% if the Rh-positive fetus is ABO compatible with its mother, 2% if the fetus is ABO incompatible, and 2-5% after an abortion. The ABO-incompatible RBCs are rapidly destroyed in the maternal circulation, reducing the likelihood of exposure to the immune system. The degree of Rh sensitization of the mother is directly related to the amount of fetomaternal hemorrhage (ie, 3% with <0.1 mL compared with 22% with >0.1 mL).
Wow, I never knew that. Guess we learn something every day.

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#65 of 65 Old 11-24-2009, 10:51 AM
 
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hey that is a great quote regarding the ABO incompatibility- can you give me the source? I would like to give it to my Dr.

whoops, I just realized it's in that same article you posted, I just didn't see it at first!
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