Reason to refuse PKU test? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 02:09 AM - Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: the Circle K
Posts: 6,062
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Is there any medical reason for refusing the metabolic disorders (PKU etc) test? We did it with DD and I am planning on doing it again with this bebe but someone said they researched it and decided against. They couldn't support their decision because it had been too long but I thought someone here might know the reasons behind refusing the test.

With the seriousness of PKU and other metabolic disorders, saying the heel prick is "too painful" is not enough for me to change my mind. I am looking for other reasons.

Thanks!
lalaland42 is offline  
#2 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 06:20 AM
 
ann_of_loxley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 5,454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well, since PKU is something inherited from both parents, if you know that both parents do not have this biochemical abnormatility (or that at least one of you doesn't), and you also feel the heel prick is 'too painful' - then you can feel comfortable in opting out of it.

Also - maybe their diet is already suited to a child with PKU? (for example, I know mine is) - So they may feel comfortable in testing the child at an older age. Because treatment for PKU is just dietary changes with a special diet.

Also - from my understanding, it needs to be done within the first month but not right after the baby is born as the test results will be inaccurate - yet many hospitals in America do the test within the first few days of a babies life - which is pointless.

PKU is very rare, though you probably already know that. Maybe someone feels comfortable enough with the extreme rarity of it to opt out of it?

I am personally deciding wether or not to opt out of the heel prick tests at all myself as we are free from PKU inheritance. They also only check for four things here in the UK and PKU is the only serious one (that needs diagnosing sooner rather than later) - there also isn't a chance in heck that sickle cell is gonna be a problem for our family either!

Mummy me : > Thats Ann! and my beautiful SONS Duncanand Hamish 19/09/05 & 22/04/10!
ann_of_loxley is offline  
#3 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 06:23 AM
 
crunchy_mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Missouri
Posts: 5,968
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
However, the PKU tests for many, many more metabolic disorderes than just PKU itself. I don't understand why you wouldn't.

Happily Married to my : 11 yrs- Mama to wild-eyed monkey boy 7-04, fiery little girl 4-07, and the happy smiley baby that sleeps 11-09!
crunchy_mama is offline  
#4 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 06:34 AM
 
ann_of_loxley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 5,454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by crunchy_mama View Post
However, the PKU tests for many, many more metabolic disorderes than just PKU itself. I don't understand why you wouldn't.
Not in this country - they only check for four things.

Mummy me : > Thats Ann! and my beautiful SONS Duncanand Hamish 19/09/05 & 22/04/10!
ann_of_loxley is offline  
#5 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 09:09 AM
 
savithny's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Posts: 1,820
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ann_of_loxley View Post
Not in this country - they only check for four things.
but one of those things is probably galactosemia, which would need to be "treated" immediately by stopping all lactose ingestion, yes?

And unlike PKU, the galactosemia test does not require the waiting period - the test is accurate even before the child has begun nursing. So not only is that test more applicable to people who are breastfeeding, because they would have to change what they're doing - but it is accurate from the very beginning.

savithny, 42 year old moderate mom to DS Primo (age 12) and DD Secunda (age 9).

savithny is offline  
#6 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 09:17 AM
 
ann_of_loxley's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Gloucestershire, UK
Posts: 5,454
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Nope - they do not check for that. Never even heard of it.

Mummy me : > Thats Ann! and my beautiful SONS Duncanand Hamish 19/09/05 & 22/04/10!
ann_of_loxley is offline  
#7 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 09:39 AM
 
2lilsweetfoxes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: My own little world...
Posts: 1,359
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I refuse all newborn interventions except the tests. My husband and I have not been tested to see if we are carriers, and knowing the disorders are recessive, one could technically have 10 kids that are not affected and the 11th be affected. (or the first be affected--ya never know).
2lilsweetfoxes is offline  
#8 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 09:43 AM
 
AlexisT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central PA
Posts: 2,265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
ann_of_loxley, how can your diet be suitable for PKU? In the strictest form of the PKU diet, all sources of protein are eliminated. And breastmilk contains phenylalanine, so you can't just breastfeed a PKU baby (you can give some breast milk but it needs to be supplemented with PKU formula).

DD 01/2007, DS 09/2011

AlexisT is offline  
#9 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 09:48 AM
 
AlexisT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central PA
Posts: 2,265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Savithny, UK does not screen for galactosemia. I think the logic is that unlike PKU, it presents with symptoms.

I wonder how you could know you are PKU free--most people have not had genetic testing. It's dangerous to assume that you are not because you have never had a PKU baby in either family. Since the mutation is rare, it's unlikely that 2 carriers will marry and have a child--and you could have a whole family of carriers where only 1 married another carrier, and same for the other side. You'd never know.

DD 01/2007, DS 09/2011

AlexisT is offline  
#10 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 10:10 AM
 
Aridel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 827
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ann_of_loxley View Post
Well, since PKU is something inherited from both parents, if you know that both parents do not have this biochemical abnormatility (or that at least one of you doesn't), and you also feel the heel prick is 'too painful' - then you can feel comfortable in opting out of it.

Also - maybe their diet is already suited to a child with PKU? (for example, I know mine is) - So they may feel comfortable in testing the child at an older age. Because treatment for PKU is just dietary changes with a special diet.

Also - from my understanding, it needs to be done within the first month but not right after the baby is born as the test results will be inaccurate - yet many hospitals in America do the test within the first few days of a babies life - which is pointless.

PKU is very rare, though you probably already know that. Maybe someone feels comfortable enough with the extreme rarity of it to opt out of it?

I am personally deciding wether or not to opt out of the heel prick tests at all myself as we are free from PKU inheritance. They also only check for four things here in the UK and PKU is the only serious one (that needs diagnosing sooner rather than later) - there also isn't a chance in heck that sickle cell is gonna be a problem for our family either!
It's great that you were genetically tested and found clear of being a carrier! That information does make some choices like this so much easier!

It's too bad the UK only tests for four disorders - even though they're rare, many of the issues that the newborn screens here look far are very serious, and very treatable.

It's true that the results are not accurate until after the baby has nursed - if I remember correctly it has to be at least 12 hours after birth, and after the baby has had actual breastmilk (or formula) not just colostrum. Then it should be followed up a few weeks later with a second screen.

OP - I would feel comfortable refusing the screening in the hospital and getting the screening done at the pediatrician's office. I would also research ahead of time: the general rule is to keep a typical diet until after the re-test is done, even if the screening is positive, but some doctors tell women to stop breastfeeding before the follow up results come back. I wouldn't stress about it, since these disorders are so rare, but just be prepared with research in case you do have a positive screen.
Aridel is offline  
#11 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 10:11 AM
 
Youngfrankenstein's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 2,273
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Even though we'll be skipping the norm newborn stuff, we will have the metabolic screen done. My midwife does it herself and recommened it.

Mama to 4. winner.jpghomebirth.jpg
Youngfrankenstein is offline  
#12 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 11:10 AM
 
Beppie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Heartland
Posts: 1,186
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Our last child was born at home and the PKU was the only thing that we did. We took her in when she was 10 days old. My midwife is very non-interventionist, but PKU was one thing she recommended. I don't know of any reason why you wouldn't do it, except that the little one usually cries but nursing usually soothes them!

Mama to dd born 7/2005, dd born 12/2007 and dd born 11/2009.
Beppie is offline  
#13 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 11:38 AM
 
jillmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: TX
Posts: 3,240
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Where I live (Texas), it is required by law (does allow for religious exemptions only), so as I have no religious issues with it, I plan to do it for this one like I did for the first two. If you choose not to, you may want to see what the laws are in your area and what exemptions are allowed to be sure you can satisfy those.

Jill stillheart.gif Chris (7/96), mommy to 3 sweet redheads: jumpers.gif Matthew autismribbon.gif (12/02), Michelle (8/05) and Marissa (1/10). Nursing since 2002.
jillmamma is offline  
#14 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 11:41 AM
 
dogmom327's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Sioux Falls, SD
Posts: 5,738
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think the test here in Oregon tests for like 30 conditions? We went ahead and had it done for both kids when they were a week old.

Mama to DS (6/07) h20homebirth.gif, DD (6/09) h20homebirth.gif, and DD (07/12) homebirth.jpg..

dogmom327 is offline  
#15 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 11:55 AM
 
poiyt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 861
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ann_of_loxley View Post
Well, since PKU is something inherited from both parents, if you know that both parents do not have this biochemical abnormatility (or that at least one of you doesn't), and you also feel the heel prick is 'too painful' - then you can feel comfortable in opting out of it.

Also - maybe their diet is already suited to a child with PKU? (for example, I know mine is) - So they may feel comfortable in testing the child at an older age. Because treatment for PKU is just dietary changes with a special diet.

Also - from my understanding, it needs to be done within the first month but not right after the baby is born as the test results will be inaccurate - yet many hospitals in America do the test within the first few days of a babies life - which is pointless.
These 3 statements are incorrect

My husband has pku, so you can imagine the extensive research we have done, and genetisits and nutritionists we've talked to.

There is no such thing as carrier testing for PKU. You cannot know you are a carrier unless your child has pku, or your parent has pku. For example, all our kids will be carriers b/c of my husband. Even if all our kids are negative its still no guarantee that Im not a carrier (If i am our kids have a 50% chance of having the disease, for two carriers its 25%) There is a test, that in Canada costs $7500, that can look for a small abnormality which tells you the percentage of liklihood that you are a carrier (like the triple screen test during pregnancy for downs). It also yields so many innacurate results that no provider here will recommend it.

You cannot have a phe free diet. Its not protein you need to avoid: its phenylalanine; it just so happens meat is a high source of Phe. Phe is in bread, pasta, alcohol, some veggies...etc...It would be virtually impossible to have a no/low phe diet unless you were specifically avoiding phe - but why would you?

Pku testing can be done at anytime once the baby has started to digest breastmilk - not colustrum. You can test a baby at 3 months, 2 yrs. Delays will start to show at around 8 weeks. Its important for those with pku to go on the low phe diet asap, so its better to start at 2yrs than not at all.

Obviously, I recommend the pku,metabolic diseases test...

Lindsay: DS#1 (06/06) DD#1 (09/07) DS#2 (10/08) DD#2 (06/09). AND A BABY DUE NOVEMBER 2013

poiyt is offline  
#16 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 12:14 PM - Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: the Circle K
Posts: 6,062
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for all the information! I am quite comfortable with nursing through a heel prick. We will be in Switzerland when the baby is born and I am not sure what metabolic disorders they check for but I will ask our midwife when we get there.

I know PKU and other metabolic disorders are rather rare but I would be devastated if my baby got irreversible brain damage or died when I could have prevented it with a heel prick and diet change.
lalaland42 is offline  
#17 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 12:18 PM
 
alegna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 44,408
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by jillmamma View Post
Where I live (Texas), it is required by law (does allow for religious exemptions only), so as I have no religious issues with it, I plan to do it for this one like I did for the first two. If you choose not to, you may want to see what the laws are in your area and what exemptions are allowed to be sure you can satisfy those.
It's easy to opt out of in TX.

-Angela
alegna is offline  
#18 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 12:19 PM
 
alegna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 44,408
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
It's a risk/benefit analysis, like anything else. One of the things I considered a "risk" in my decision making was false positives- which are far too high for my comfort.

-Angela
alegna is offline  
#19 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 12:42 PM
 
Norasmomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: The sunny side of the mountains
Posts: 4,403
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just watched a baby get the heal prick at my Dr office a month or 2 ago. The lab tech there is wonderful and he warms the baby's heal with a warm washcloth to bring the blood to the capillaries, he then uses one of those glass rods to do the blood draw. The baby didn't even wince, she slept through the entire process, no crying, no nursing, nothing, she just slept. I was totally amazed at his way of doing this test, he said he has tried to get the hospital staff to do it, where our DD and our current baby will be born. He said he's taught them this procedure, but many of them don't do it and so like our DD the baby screams. Ugh it's horrid.

I am going to ask if I can wait until the follow up appt, so he can do it or take our baby to my Dr's office so he can do it rom the get go. It was just such a better method.

Me Wife to T (14 years)Mama to Princess(4) and Monster Boy(my 1 year old ):
Norasmomma is offline  
#20 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 01:01 PM
 
Astraia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
For DD, the midwife said that they test for (I think she said?) 32 disorders with the heel stick test.

We're UCing for this baby, but I plan to bring baby to a dr 5-10 days after birth to get the testing done.

All I know about it is that it's important to wait until your milk comes in so baby isn't getting colostrum... other than that, no idea when it's supposed to be done. With DD, the midwife did it 5 days after she was born.

She warmed her heel with hot water first as well, and DD barely cried.

Grace - wife to Jeff and mama to Nigella (11/08) and Orrin (01/10)- expecting a new addition (05/12)! Life is a whirlwind, but I'm learning to enjoy the ride!

Astraia is offline  
#21 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 01:05 PM - Thread Starter
Banned
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: the Circle K
Posts: 6,062
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
It's a risk/benefit analysis, like anything else. One of the things I considered a "risk" in my decision making was false positives- which are far too high for my comfort.

-Angela
Why is that a risk? If you know there are a high number of false positives, then you get a more sensitive test and wait to worry until that test is returned. That doesn't seem like a rational reason for rejecting a test that could save a baby's life.
lalaland42 is offline  
#22 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 01:32 PM
 
dnr3301's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,493
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I declined with my dd, thinking it was just another routine thing, and I had avoided all the other routine things, so why bother.

then she had a stroke at 17 months, and they did the test then. Luckily, it had nothing to do with anything like that, but it would have been nice to have been able to say we had already done it. She's fine now.

I did the test with my second, and will with my third. I dragged my 4-5 day pp butt into the hospital and asked for the special care nursery nurse to do the draw.

I used to think it's no biggie to skip it, but I have a friend sho had a baby, thought about declining, then did it, it came back showing something, baby is fine, because she is on meds for the rest of her life. If they had waited even a week to do the testing, most likely would have had brain damage and metal retardation.

Most of the stuff they are testing for, it's not about a family history, or waiting for symptoms. Waiting for symptoms is stupid. By the time you see them, it's too late to prevent them. We're not talking about fevers or spots, we're talking blindness and severe mental retardation that could easily be prevented. False positives? ok, retest. how does that hurt?

they test for more than just PKU, at least in most states (I don't know about other countries). I know in MN, it's 53 disorders. In Wisc, it's 47. In Iowa, it's only 7 or so. In ND, it's 47; SD it's at least 20 (they include all of the blood issues in one thing that says __ and other disorders, so I can't tell how many that is). In TX, it's 27.

R~mama to 3

dnr3301 is offline  
#23 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 01:36 PM
 
poiyt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 861
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If you are uc'ing...you can get the blood dot cards and do it yourself and mail it in to wherever the doc would send it. you might want to be familiar with lancets though..

oh, and in regards to false positives. Like with any diagnosis (cancer, pneomonia etc..) they repeat the test to confirm. In this case the repeat test is a much more detailed look at the specific disease in a much more complicated way..its still just blood though.

Lindsay: DS#1 (06/06) DD#1 (09/07) DS#2 (10/08) DD#2 (06/09). AND A BABY DUE NOVEMBER 2013

poiyt is offline  
#24 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 01:51 PM
 
Astraia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2,400
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by poiyt View Post
If you are uc'ing...you can get the blood dot cards and do it yourself and mail it in to wherever the doc would send it. you might want to be familiar with lancets though..

oh, and in regards to false positives. Like with any diagnosis (cancer, pneomonia etc..) they repeat the test to confirm. In this case the repeat test is a much more detailed look at the specific disease in a much more complicated way..its still just blood though.
really? where would I find information on this (without telling my dr I plan to UC)?

Grace - wife to Jeff and mama to Nigella (11/08) and Orrin (01/10)- expecting a new addition (05/12)! Life is a whirlwind, but I'm learning to enjoy the ride!

Astraia is offline  
#25 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 02:11 PM
 
poiyt's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: British Columbia, Canada
Posts: 861
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
hmm we have them already because of dh..but if you know a uc friendly midwife...or you may be able order online but would have to order a package of them.

Lindsay: DS#1 (06/06) DD#1 (09/07) DS#2 (10/08) DD#2 (06/09). AND A BABY DUE NOVEMBER 2013

poiyt is offline  
#26 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 03:34 PM
 
homemademomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: ct
Posts: 2,974
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i had both my kids screened, but my daughter's test was not done properly (not enough blood, i guess), so it was sent back to the midwife. i neglected to get it done again- it just didn't seem important at the time.

15 months later she was ataxic with several other problems, and it came to light that she had never had her metabolic screening. The guilt and dread I felt while I waited for those test results was overwhelming. I would not wish that feeling on anyone. She does not have a metabolic issue, thank goodness, but if she had that would have been something we would have had to deal with for the rest of her and my life- that I allowed, through my negligence, my daughter to suffer through a treatable disorder.

i will take the stress of a false positive or inconclusive test over that, any day!!! seriously- i am as woo as it gets but some tests and procedures are just. good. they just are.


I will be lining up for the screening if I have any more kids!

Mom to two perfect kids earth.gif  surrogate to two sweetpotatos heartbeat.gifheartbeat.gif born 4.21.11  

I love someone with ataxia telangiectasia http://www.atcp.org

homemademomma is offline  
#27 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 04:43 PM
 
alegna's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 44,408
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lalaland42 View Post
Why is that a risk? If you know there are a high number of false positives, then you get a more sensitive test and wait to worry until that test is returned. That doesn't seem like a rational reason for rejecting a test that could save a baby's life.
A number of conditions on the screen require you to NOT nurse if you get a positive (false positive) so an early interruption to the nursing relationship is a real possibility. All for something that is very very rare.

Like I said- it's a risk/benefit thing. Every parent needs to decide for themselves

-Angela
alegna is offline  
#28 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 06:10 PM
 
AlexisT's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Central PA
Posts: 2,265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes, these disorders are rare. They also cause death and permanent brain damage. The absolute risk is small. The magnitude of that risk is huge. I would rather risk my breastfeeding relationship than preventable brain damage. My children will survive and be healthy with formula. A PKU or galactosemic baby will be permanently, irrevocably damaged from breastmilk.

DD 01/2007, DS 09/2011

AlexisT is offline  
#29 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 06:35 PM
 
mwherbs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Tucson, AZ
Posts: 5,575
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
most of the disorders are rare- most common in our region is the hypo thyroid- I guess the biggest draw back is that for most diseases it is just a screening test ( for CF it could be state of the art diagnostic but most state laws have not changed so you still have to go through the other testing) any how as all screening tests go there are more false positives than actual cases of genetic disorders and parents tend to think that there is something very wrong even after the diagnostic tests show that there is no problem--
so that would be the main drawback- you can also get an expanded set of tests that include things you state may not have decided to ok - there are labs in Texas I know of that do the expanded testing--


one of the tests in the UK is for MCADD-
Medium Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency I don't know what the others are... there is a great deal of discussion going on because of the way things can be screened now - and the UK may very well start offering more screening

-------------
I looked for and found the UK info they actually have a different take on "screening" in general check out what they say(basically physical exams are screening)
here is what they do screen for in the newborn

* Newborn bloodspot screening: Phenylketonuria (PKU) | Congenital Hypothyroidism | Cystic Fibrosis | Medium Chain Acyl CoA Dehydrogenase Deficiency (MCADD) | Sickle Cell Disease
* Hearing
* Newborn physical examination: Developmental dislocation of the hip | Congenital heart disease | Cryptorchidism | Congenital cataracts and other structural eye anomalies | Congenital malformations

and here is a web link for anyone interested in some of their policies- it includes childhood pregnancy and adult health screenings of different types-
http://www.screening.nhs.uk/policies
mwherbs is offline  
#30 of 84 Old 08-19-2009, 07:09 PM
 
sophiekat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: revolting with the knitters
Posts: 1,613
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
A number of conditions on the screen require you to NOT nurse if you get a positive (false positive) so an early interruption to the nursing relationship is a real possibility. All for something that is very very rare.

Like I said- it's a risk/benefit thing. Every parent needs to decide for themselves

-Angela
But the result of the screen is not a "false positive." It's an indicator that further testing is needed. The further testing is what comes up "positive" (meaning the child does have PKU/galactosemia/etc), and then breastfeeding needs to stop because it is causing damage to the baby.
You (general) may be dismissing a valuable test based purely on (incorrect) semantics -- I would hate for someone reading this to be swayed by unfounded fears of "false positives."

Obstruct livery vehicles!

sophiekat is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off