I Was Not Happy With My Birth Experience. (c-section + Infected Uterus + Antibiotics) - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 12 Old 03-01-2004, 10:35 PM - Thread Starter
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During my pregnancy with my second child, i was retaining excessive amounts of water and my blood pressure was slightly elevated. So my doctor told me he wanted to be extra cautious. He told me to stop drinking so much water (I thought that was weird) and to only drink 4 small coffee cups of water per day.

I told him that I was excessively thirsty and found it difficult to drink such little water. In fact, I was more interested in drinking fluids than eating. ( I was pregant during an extremely hot summer-perhaps that had something to do with it?)

But anyway, during the last several weeks prior to my due date, the doctor kept commenting that the baby was still laying really high up and should have dropped by then. So he scheduled an induction exactly on the due date.

My husband and I went to the hospital around 7:00 am. I was given an IV and Pitocin to start the contractions around 8:00 or so and hooked up to the machine that monitors the baby's heartbeat and my contractions.

The nurses would periodically check on me to and ask me if I was feeling any pain because I was having contractions. I did not feel anything. The doctors (B.K.A medical students A.K.A. on the job trainers ) would come in to check my cervix and proceed to tell me that I was still tightly closed and not appearing to dilate).

So they kept increasing the Pitocin and the contractions did get stronger and I did begin to feel real pain. But I was still not dilating. Then one of the medical students said that she thought the baby was not in the right position and not putting enough pressure on my uterus--so she performs and ultrasound to double check. Then she gets this worried look on her face and says that she needs to consult with another doctor. So the other doctor comes in and says that there is nothing wrong and that the other doctor thought that the baby's head may have been in an awkward position.

Hours pass by, the contractions intensify but my cervix stays put and the baby is not dropping. My water finally breaks and I am told by the nurse that I need to lay on my side and receive oxygen because the baby's heartrate keeps dropping and rising with each contraction.

My obstetrician arrives and checks my cervix and says that I have dilated only about half a centimeter and I was around 8:00 pm by then! So he gives me a different kind of fetal heart monitor that goes into my and attaches to the baby's head. (OWWWWWW! is all I have to say about that!) Then he tells me that I should not be on my side but flat on my back! He too commented that the baby did not seem to be tolerating the contractions well. And because my water had already broken the risk of infection was increased--and he might have to intervene and perform a
c-section to protect the health of the baby.

So about 1.5-2 more hours passed and I still was only half a centimeter and my doctor scheduled the c-section. I must admit that the doctor who gave me the epidural did a very good job because I hardly felt any discomfort from the needle.

When my baby was delivered he came out crying and continued crying for SEVEN HOURS! He wouldn't even nurse.

I felt like I was in a mental fog and felt shaky all over. The next day, the doctor tells me that my uterus is infected and I need to receive antibiotics intravenously. So I was on TRIPLE antibiotics for the remainder of my stay in the hospital and several days at home.

At first the antibiotics were administered through a regular IV, but for some reason the fluid kept leaking into my tissue. So three IV's later, the doctor ordered a pic line IV. (A tiny hole is cut into your skin and a tube is fed through your vein up into your neck )

My baby was so sleepy, I had difficult getting him to feed or wake up. I asked the nurse, if the anesthesia may have had something to do with it and she told me that I did not need to be concerned about the drugs because everything they give us is safe for the baby. Yeah right. :

Although, I am very thankful that the doctor delivered him safely--I can't help but wonder if I should have questioned the induction. I wonder if my baby cried for so long because he was not ready to be born in addition to the effects from the anesthesia. I am also upset that I felt so mentally foggy during and immediately after the birth. I was in a period of depression for several months after the whole experience.

Has anyone had a similar experience?
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#2 of 12 Old 03-01-2004, 10:44 PM
 
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All I can say is sorry. I had a horrible, yet necessary csectoin. Unfortunatly you have a lot to recover from. Take responsibility for your role in what happened and hopefully heal so that if you chose to have another baby you can have the birth you want.

You asked should you have questioned the induction. I would say yes, but hind sight is 20/20. What I think would have sent my alarm bell was off was the issues during the pregnancy.

I hope your baby is thriving now and that your recovery at home is well.

Kim
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#3 of 12 Old 03-01-2004, 10:45 PM
 
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I haven't, but I just want to say how sorry I am that your pregnancy and labor were so mismanaged. Restricting water intake is a BAD idea when you have fluid retention, and induction should NEVER be done just because the baby hasn't dropped by the due date.

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#4 of 12 Old 03-01-2004, 10:48 PM - Thread Starter
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I forgot to mention that I did have preeclampsia during my pregnancy. That was one of the reasons that I didn't question the induction.

But me and the baby are doing fine. And I am much wiser for any future births.
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#5 of 12 Old 03-01-2004, 11:05 PM
 
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I can definately understand your situation EBM, it was super similiar to mine.

2 weeks to the day overdue and my bloodpressure goes up by 20 points. My doctor suggests that we induce via the cervical gel, trusting the doc we go for it.

First application of the gel was at 9 pm, slight cramping overnight, followed by the second application at 6 am the following day.

By the time we arrived back from the hospital I am having serious contractions every 3 minutes lasting 2 minutes long. I am thinking wow this is fast so I call my Doula/Monitrice and she coo coos me and tells me to go for a walk. So dh and I take a half hour walk around the neighbourhood and by the time we are back I am having contractions one on top of the other lasting about 3 minutes long and strong.

The doula comes over and we labour for about one more hour and then I beg her to check me. I am 8 centimetres. This is 10 AM.

We rush like mad to the hospital (first big mistake) and when I get there I am almost zoned right out into my labour trance. The rude nurse checks me and announces that I am 10 centimetres and I should push. Downhill from here. I decide okay I'll push even though I am not sure if I am really feeling it.

So I push. and I push. And I keep on pushing. 6 hours of serious struggling later I am told take your pick.....forceps or csection. Given that my sister was a forceps baby with damage I say allright csection it is.

What followed was me struggling to succeed at breastfeeding and about 6 months of blaming myself for what I considered failure to birth correctly. Many many months of pain and stress to feel empowered by my dd's birth.

I worked super hard at succeeding at exclusively breastfeeding even though almost everyone but my dh thought I should supplement. I just kept thinking , I didn't succeed at the birth so I must succeed at this and I DID! We are still bfing and dd is 28 months!

Finally at about the age of 10 months I truly felt like I could accept the birth for what it was and finally was able to say the word ceserian out loud without crying. I am proud to have done what I could with what I knew at the time.

Like M.Angelou says: When you know better, you do better. There are parts of my dd's birth I am really proud of, no drugs for pain, and some that I am not, saying what I needed more often and listening more to my body.

All I can say is that birth is empowering in so many ways. It is a journey all Mothers take in one way or another. It is important to believe in your child's birth and take the lessons from it and grow.
Colleen
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#6 of 12 Old 03-01-2004, 11:10 PM
 
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I cannot believe a provider, when faced with a woman with swelling, would tell her to cut back her water and DRINK COFFEE.

OMG. I am in shock.

I am sorry you had such a bad experience. Your labor and subsequent birth was managed against medical evidence. Slight rises in blood pressure in the last trimester are normal and unless a liver panel showed issues, there is no room for a diagnosis of pre-eclampsia and no need to induce based on what you have said here.

Wow. I cannot believe what this doctor had you do. I'm totally amazed and deeply saddened.
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#7 of 12 Old 03-01-2004, 11:16 PM
 
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I'm so sorry you had a bad experience! That sounds like a lot to process.
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#8 of 12 Old 03-01-2004, 11:17 PM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally posted by pamamidwife
I cannot believe a provider, when faced with a woman with swelling, would tell her to cut back her water and DRINK COFFEE.

Oh no no, he said to drink water in an amount equivalent to small coffee cups! There is no way, I would have listened to that suggestion.
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#9 of 12 Old 03-01-2004, 11:46 PM
 
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I still think that is a ridiculously small amount of water. Did he or she not know that water is a natural diuretic? That drinking more can help reduce swelling?

Sheesh.
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#10 of 12 Old 03-02-2004, 01:47 AM
 
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I had a similar experience. I had GBS, my waters broke, and I didn't go into established labour. I was having 4 hours antibiotics for the GBS as soon as I arrived at the birth centre. I had blood pressure issues (some swelling, and my BP would soar then stablise. It was actually doing ok until the ob's came to 'visit' me in the birth centre). I was transferred to the hospital labour ward and induced with pitocin, and went into labour straight away and laboured for 6 hours with no progress from .5-1cms, which was were I'd started, BP fluctuating the whole time. At this point I'd laboured half the time they'd allow on pitocin, was pushing their limits for broken waters with GBS and probably most importantly, had been awake since Monday morning, not labouring, and been subject to the poor bedside manner of the obgyns - so I agreed to a csection and she was born at 12:15am Wednesday morning. She had the cord wrapped around her neck twice, which they suggested was effecting her presentation, but not her health, as she came out pink and screaming with apgars of 9 then 10. She was 100% fine. I had a post partum hemorrhage.

In the immediate post partum period my newborn was treated for an infection based on one high temp during her first 24 hours, her blood work came back a few days later ok with one reading borderline for an infection. At about 7 days old, we were looking forward to leaving the hospital, and they decided I had an infection too and I was treated with antibiotics, staying another day. Because I was well and truly established as a pain in the arse at this point, they "allowed" me to have oral antibiotics as I wouldn't agree to an IV until my bloodwork got back. I was on lots of tablets for this and that and my partner had to write up a chart when I got home to remember when to take what. People tell me now they could not believe how sick I looked.

Overall, it was totally crappy. They had lousy nurses in there that undermined the breastfeeding relationship (the only issue on which i was able to stand my ground because i KNEW without a doubt I was right, and had a paed back me up). It was such a far cry from the waterbirth I wanted, and it was so hard to accept each intervention knowing what road it could lead me down.

It was extremely distressing to contemplate the whole experience for a long time, but I just found it very easy to recount my experience now. I see now how in many ways it was inevitable, from my health, to choosing a hospital based birth centre. I also made good decisions - I had a doula and was fairly well educated about birth and intervention.

Quote:
Although, I am very thankful that the doctor delivered him safely--I can't help but wonder if I should have questioned the induction.
Well you could of questioned him, but I imagine he would have encouraged you to induce anyway. If he recommends it he is generally not going to backtrack. You put your good faith in your doctor and if the induction was a bad idea, it was his bad idea. It's a crazy world where you can't trust your doctor to only act in YOUR interest but the reality is, your health is only one of their priorities. They also care about following standards of care (which aren't always evidence based), action over inaction, management of their labour ward and operating theatre, staffing, their schedules, yada yada. I fought them all the way in my care, to just follow hospital protocols, as they always wanted to do things sooner. I know they used fear and specific information to get me to act their way - they would talk about the risk of GBS infection and ignore the risks of induction for instance, and be very annoyed when I would bring their attention to it.

I guess what I'm saying is - if you gave your trust to the doctor in good faith, please try not to feel responsible. Next time, you will perhaps make a different choice with the information you have now.

Next baby, I am getting fit and planning the pregnancy and I'm hoping to afford an independent midwife, and get a back-up ob that is well known for vbac and used by the independent midwives as backup. Then I will let go of the outcome
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#11 of 12 Old 03-02-2004, 10:58 AM - Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally posted by azyre
I guess what I'm saying is - if you gave your trust to the doctor in good faith, please try not to feel responsible. Next time, you will perhaps make a different choice with the information you have now.
What a kind thing to say. Thank you.

We hope to have another baby in the future, and I plan to handle things totally different--I will be in charge and not so easily persuaded by their fear tactics.
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#12 of 12 Old 03-02-2004, 07:42 PM
 
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I hear a lot about doctors who do things that contradict what they say, and experienced some of this in my own labor.

If they think the baby is at risk for infection, they should not have introduced the internal monitor. They should have kept their hands out of your vagina.

If the fetus is losing oxygen, the mother should not lie on her back. (It's also a sign that the Pitocin should be turned off.)

My doctor told me that because I had GBS, it was safer not to break the waters, but then later told me that it would actually be safer to rupture them because then the baby would be born quicker.: So which is it?

If you read Mendelsohn's Mal(e) Practice he has a chapter on toxemia, and he says it's actually beneficial for pregnant women to retain water. Retention should not be the only criteria for diagnosing toxemia.
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