placenta encapsulation! who's doing it, who's done it!? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
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Birth and Beyond > placenta encapsulation! who's doing it, who's done it!?
Carlyle's Avatar Carlyle 12:44 PM 11-23-2010


Quote:
Originally Posted by joynsyde View Post

Then put the slices in the food processor, and instead of fine powder, I just got big chunks.  I was so frustrated, because I couldn't get those chunks into gelatin capsules!  And there was no WAY I was going to eat it without some kind of covering.  (Mental block, I know, but that's life.)

But where there's a will there's a way.  I remembered how my grandma used to get me to take my vitamins-- by wrapping them in soft white bread-- and I decided to do the same thing.  It took a long time.  I took a chunk of placenta, wrapped a piece of soft bread around it, and put it in a bag, which went into the freezer to keep them fresh.  (I made about 60 this way, until I got really tired of the tedious process, and there's still some placenta chunks left in the freezer.)  Now I can swallow the "pills" without being grossed out.


That's seriously resourceful!  We had the same problem in the food processor, but got great results by putting the chunks in a coffee grinder (ew, I know).  I've also read a suggestion from someone here to put the larger chunks in a paper bag and bang on it with a rock to get the pieces small enough to fit into the coffee grinder (dh chopped them smaller with a knife before we read that suggestion, and that worked fine too--although it sounds like your knives aren't that great).
 



June Bug's Avatar June Bug 10:49 PM 11-23-2010

If you can stomach it, have someone chop it up and saute it in a pan with some garlic and onions. I was a little grossed out by the idea but after my birth my husband cooked it for me and I ate it no problem (not the whole thing). I had some after the birth, some later that day and then a little more the next day. Honestly, it was not bad. It is like your body needs it so much that the "grossness" of it is non-existent. I've heard many stories of vegetarian and vegan mothers having a similar reaction to my own.

 

Either way, I think it is a great thing to do, so many benefits. Apparently we are the only mammals who do not eat their placenta. 


luckiest's Avatar luckiest 10:33 AM 11-26-2010

At first, the idea of ingesting our placenta, encapsulated or otherwise, totally grossed me out, but my plans have changed drastically after reading how great it is for you, and after considering the fact that ALL other mammals eat their placentas!

 

I'll be keeping enough of it for two or three smoothies (berry smoothies so I won't notice the color), and my doula is going to encapsulate the rest of it.  It takes her a couple of days to finish encapsulating, so the smoothies will get me through until the capsules come.  

 

In addition to all of the other benefits everyone has mentioned, I'm hoping it will help extend my rheumatoid arthritis remission.  I can hope!


lsmama's Avatar lsmama 07:34 PM 11-27-2010

Thanks for all of the great info, everyone.  I would prefer to pay someone else to do it, but am having no luck finding someone.  DH is on board and actually into the idea of doing it himself, but I am wondering about the logistics.  Sorry if TMI, but does it smell when you're preparing it?  Also, did anyone manage to get their placenta out of the hospital? I will be having a midwife-attended hospital birth in an extremely un-crunchy part of the country.  My midwife is fantastic, but the hospital is a little backward.  With my first, I was in the hospital for 36 hours.  If my stay this time is similar, what do I do with the placenta while we're there?  Cooler?


HeatherB's Avatar HeatherB 11:59 PM 11-27-2010


Quote:
Originally Posted by lsmama View Post

Thanks for all of the great info, everyone.  I would prefer to pay someone else to do it, but am having no luck finding someone.  DH is on board and actually into the idea of doing it himself, but I am wondering about the logistics.  Sorry if TMI, but does it smell when you're preparing it?  Also, did anyone manage to get their placenta out of the hospital? I will be having a midwife-attended hospital birth in an extremely un-crunchy part of the country.  My midwife is fantastic, but the hospital is a little backward.  With my first, I was in the hospital for 36 hours.  If my stay this time is similar, what do I do with the placenta while we're there?  Cooler?


My friend/encapsulation specialist (I was her first client) said it smelled kind of like roast beef.  She drained it (not sure how that's done), steamed it, and then dried it in a dehydrator.  You can put it in your oven on a low temp, too, though.  It looked like bacon when it was done!  I noticed some sort of odor in that area but the dehydrator was right next to the laundry room door, where a pile of birth linens had been left.  No idea which thing I was smelling, but it wasn't particularly unpleasant, either way.

 

Hospitals (and states) have various rules, so check before you go in.  Ideally someone takes it home in a cooler and puts it in the fridge/freezer for you.  I think our instructions were up to 3 hours out at room temp after birth, then up to 24 hours in the fridge before it would be preferable to freeze it.  Thankfully, the timing worked out where ours was being processed within that time frame.


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