What was continuous monitoring like for you? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 37 Old 03-15-2011, 07:09 AM
 
Comtessa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Cleveland, OH
Posts: 1,146
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by briannas auntie View Post

Are you actually allowed to be naked during labor in a hospital?  I always thought it was policy that you had to wear those hospital gowns. Can you get in trouble for not wearing a gown during labor or birth? 

 

 

It is one of my absolute biggest pet peeves that we all use the language of permission when we talk about hospitals.  They have established their institutional power over us so thoroughly that we are cowed by it, and we find ourselves asking meekly, "am I allowed to do this?  Or that?"  We are the ones who allow them to have access to us.  We are the consumers of their product, and as such, we have authority over which products we will consume and which we will not.  

 

The truth is, they have very little authority to tell us what we will (or will not) wear in their hospital.   But we don't know that, and they have made us afraid to question their policies, so we all go along with it, even if we hate it.  When I arrived at the hospital with my first labor, they handed me a gown and I simply said, "no, I'm not going to wear that."  And nobody argued with me. 


I'm traveling the world with my kids without ever leaving home and blogging about it -- watch, taste, and share our adventures at TheGlobalStayCation.com!
Comtessa is offline  
#32 of 37 Old 03-17-2011, 10:39 AM - Thread Starter
 
Blanca78's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: The eastern edge of the Middle West
Posts: 2,079
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We can bring whatever we want to wear to the hospital! Right? I have no idea what I'll want on me at the time but those gowns are so annoying with their strings and flaps.

 

Anyway, mamas, I just wanted to update you all: at my 34 week appt yesterday my doctor (not her backup, whom I met with before) said intermittent monitoring up to pushing was fine (according to my doula this is the standard arrangement for practitioners around here). 15 min on the hour. Which still sounds like a pain in the a** but I feel better. At the end of the day this doctor operates within a more medicalized model than I am comfortable with, but my choices are limited due to insurance (I have to go to the med center for the university where I'm a student), and I really do like her on a personal level--she strikes me as pragmatic and respectful of my needs (at 30 weeks she actually encouraged me to seek out a midwifery practice she knew because she thought it would be more in line with what I wanted, but it would have meant driving 1.5 hours instead of 5 min and my doula would have had trouble attending). Feeling like she respects me as a patient is a big thing. What is important to me is that I feel my autonomy and intelligence are respected, and while it's a bit more uphill this pregnancy than I would like, I feel like with the help of my doula I still am on track to have a good birth.

 

Also, my doctor is totally supportive of me laboring at home as long as possible (like, till 8 centimeters). The trick will be not going in too early, but even without cervical checks my doula is very experienced and says she generally has a decent idea of how dilated someone is. I also want to look into checking my own cervix.

 

Thanks all for your insights. This is a great thread.


Fiction writer by training, writer/editor of anything anyone will hire me for by trade. Me + D=my girls E (4/2011) and little N, 1/2014.

Blanca78 is offline  
#33 of 37 Old 03-17-2011, 11:30 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 2,028
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by Blanca78 View Post

We can bring whatever we want to wear to the hospital! Right? I have no idea what I'll want on me at the time but those gowns are so annoying with their strings and flaps.

 

Anyway, mamas, I just wanted to update you all: at my 34 week appt yesterday my doctor (not her backup, whom I met with before) said intermittent monitoring up to pushing was fine (according to my doula this is the standard arrangement for practitioners around here). 15 min on the hour. Which still sounds like a pain in the a** but I feel better. At the end of the day this doctor operates within a more medicalized model than I am comfortable with, but my choices are limited due to insurance (I have to go to the med center for the university where I'm a student), and I really do like her on a personal level--she strikes me as pragmatic and respectful of my needs (at 30 weeks she actually encouraged me to seek out a midwifery practice she knew because she thought it would be more in line with what I wanted, but it would have meant driving 1.5 hours instead of 5 min and my doula would have had trouble attending). Feeling like she respects me as a patient is a big thing. What is important to me is that I feel my autonomy and intelligence are respected, and while it's a bit more uphill this pregnancy than I would like, I feel like with the help of my doula I still am on track to have a good birth.

 

Also, my doctor is totally supportive of me laboring at home as long as possible (like, till 8 centimeters). The trick will be not going in too early, but even without cervical checks my doula is very experienced and says she generally has a decent idea of how dilated someone is. I also want to look into checking my own cervix.

 

Thanks all for your insights. This is a great thread.


I just want to warn you that if you are trying to move around while they to the "15 minutes" it could very well turn into constant monitoring. Often every single time the signal is lost they will restart the time. It happens a lot when a mama is moving around. So just be prepared to end up being monitored for a lot more than 15 minutes every hour. I'm serious. Tell them they can do a doppler periodically but if you consent to being monitored every hour for 15 full minutes the odds are going to end up that you will be stuck being monitored the whole time. I'm cynical I know but what your doctor says doesn't really mean much because the doctor won't be there until the end. it is the nurses at the hospital who call the shots and if they are used to getting what they want and doing it their way you are going to be in for a tough labor.

 

Ldavis24 is offline  
#34 of 37 Old 03-22-2011, 07:32 PM
 
bird_verde's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Western Maine
Posts: 211
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by thencamehenry View Post

You've already gotten some good feedback, but I'd like to share my experience with you.

 

My son was born in a hospital with a NCB-friendly OB/CNM practice.  Their policy and my birth plan stated intermittent monitoring - I think 10 minutes every hour.  They put the belts on when I got there and it never came off the whole time I was in labor (7 hours from arrival to birth).  Apparently they required a solid 10 minute strip.  If the baby moves or I move and they lose the heartbeat for even a few seconds it didn't count.  At some point, not sure when because I was in heavy labor by then, they wanted to break my water and do a scalp electrode because they couldn't get a consistent reading. I could hear his heartbeat but the strip had some gaps as he wiggled and turned, much as you would expect a healthy baby to do as he finds his way out.  I said I didn't want to do it unless he was in trouble and asked if they could monitor him with a hand-held doppler.  The nurse basically said no, that's not the point, and eventually admitted that a full 10 minute strip was required for my chart, a CYA thing.  It had nothing to do with my baby's or my health.  I truly feel like breaking my water and forcing me to lay flat on my back in the middle of intense labor would have been the start of a cascade of interventions if I hadn't known enough to refuse.

 

 



My experience with dd1 was very similar to the pp above.  I pesosnally hated the monitor.  It was on the whole time from the minute I wnet into active labor until I gave birth.  It was so distracting for me in labor as the nurse's only concern was getting a good strip and asking me to constantly stay still for 10-20 minutes - not really what I wanted to do in active labor.  Funny thing is that my doctor was totally unconcerned with getting the strip as he just used the doppler occassionally and told the nurse the full strip wasn't necessary but for some reason she was insistant.  This was actually part of the reason I decided on a homebirth for the second one - so that I could be left alone and move around!

 


Catholic wife to S and mama to my two loveys V dd1 10/04 and G dd2 11/10 - #3 due in August 2013.  Here we go again.  homebirth.jpgwinner.jpg selectivevax.gifcd.gif

bird_verde is offline  
#35 of 37 Old 03-22-2011, 07:45 PM
 
Dot-to-Dot's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 479
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 11 Post(s)

 

 

I think a lot depends on the type of labor you have,


I agree with this.  Can you just try monitoring...if it's annoying, tell them to remove it and offer to sign a waiver of your gross negligence to your baby's safety? (Please note sarcasm)  I wouldn't mind knowing how the baby is doing during all of labor...however, for me, it was terrible and I hated that damn belt every time they put it on!  But it sounds like plenty of other women didn't mind it.  *shrugs*.  It's impossible to say how you'll feel about it when the time comes.

 

If the nurses aren't reliable with heplocks...then the hospital needs to adjust their service to better suit the paying patient...not the patient adjust her wishes to better serve the doctor.  :\ 

Dot-to-Dot is offline  
#36 of 37 Old 03-23-2011, 12:48 AM
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: USA
Posts: 373
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was bullied into continuous monitoring and I wish it was the hill I chose to die on. It made my contractions so much more painful. Even though I had the wireless one, I felt my movement was restricted. Everytime I bent over it stopped working and I'd be in the middle of a contraction and they would be tugging on the straps. Next time, it'll be my hill to die on.
prone_to_wander is offline  
#37 of 37 Old 03-23-2011, 04:19 AM
 
Serenity Now's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Free and easy wandering.
Posts: 357
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 13 Post(s)

Monitoring never bothered me. I actually kind of liked watching the contractions on the monitor, because I thought it was kind of cool. They start out like little hills at first, and then when things get going, get turn more in to plateaus. I guess I'm a geek. :) I think also I'm a huge go with the flow type personality, and not much gets under my skin, so most of their policies just roll off my back. I like the assurance of having an IV because my blood pressure, which is normally low anyway, drops like a rock when I hit transition. I'm talking like 50/20. Like, I am unresponsive. And it's nice having that quick access to adrenaline, and they can pump me full of fluid to try to counteract it as much as possible. We didn't know it was going to do that with my first, so my BP dropped to 42/20, the baby's heartrate plummeted also, but with oxygen for me, and some adrenaline, and squeezing the bag of fluid in to my body, all was well. When it actually happens, I don't know that anything is wrong, which in hindsight is probably the scariest thing. I feel a little sleepy, but my mind is so far gone that it doesn't ring any alarm bells at all. I just slowly drift away, and everyone thinks I have fallen asleep or I'm" in the zone" (that was my midwife with my non-epidural hosp birth), and leaves me alone. and somewhere through this tunnel I can hear them talking, but I can't move or talk to them. It's kind of funky.

 

I always bring my own clothes. The nurse at my last birth gave me a talking to about it, but it's not her decision what I wear, it's mine. She thought I'd get upset if it got messy. Nah. I can wash it.

 

I've given birth in 3 different hospitals, and in general I was able to pretty much do whatever I wanted. Honestly, my midwife birth was the worst as far as being bossed goes. The woman just had some idea I was an idiot in her head and she was trying to de-indoctrinate me about the right way to birth. Whatever. It didn't go as she had planned, lol. With my first birth my husband was the one who delivered the baby. The OB didn't even touch her. The midwife wouldn't let dh near me, but I wish she would have let him do it again because she was pretty terrible. And with my third I delivered her myself, and once again, the OB was just nearby. I've never had anyone pull on the cord, or scrape out the placenta, or really do much of anything to me. Nursing care has been spotty. Some of them good, some of them bad.

 

With my first birth (I'm high risk) I was expecting all these horrible things to happen to me because I had read on here and other boards about the way the hospital brings you down. But it wasn't like that. My first birth was really nice. It was very peaceful, and lovely. My second birth was a bit of a mess, because he was in a weird position and my midwife had ego issues, but it was still fine. And my third birth was very emotional because of some family issues, but incredibly sweet. I'll remember pulling her warm, wet limp little body out and laying her on my tummy, while she didn't cry but just looked at me in the eyes for the longest time, for the rest of my life. Unfortunately because she didn't cry she ended up needing oxygen, but they just kind of sprayed it on her face to make sure she pinked up OK, so we could sit and get to know one another. My biggest problem with birthing in a hospital is the after care. Once again, the nurses are really hit or miss, and I get out of there AMA as soon as I feel comfortable.

Serenity Now is online now  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off