is it delivery? ...or is it birth? - Mothering Forums
View Poll Results: is it delivery or birth?
birth 141 99.30%
delivery 1 0.70%
Voters: 142. You may not vote on this poll

1 2  3 
Birth and Beyond > is it delivery? ...or is it birth?
tinyshoes's Avatar tinyshoes 08:58 PM 11-03-2005
Do you prefer the verb birth or delivery, to use when talking about babies being born?

Years ago, when I first started using the word birth, it sounded a little strange to say, "I birthed a baby," but now I can't imagine using deliver to describe the act of a baby being born.

I think delivery diminishes the roles of the true stars of the birth (vaginal or trans-abdominal): mom and baby. Delivery seems distanced, removed...like "birth canal." (uh, it's a vagina--unless I'm having a discussion with my in-laws!)

I also prefer the term "c-section birth" rather than "c-section delivery." "My baby was born via c-section" or "I had a c-section birth" sound different than "It was a cesarean delivery."

Noelia430's Avatar Noelia430 10:10 PM 11-03-2005
I prefer the term birth because pizzas are "delivered", not babies.
Storm Bride's Avatar Storm Bride 10:24 PM 11-03-2005
I prefer the term birth, but I don't think of my sections as births - not at all.
hunnybumm's Avatar hunnybumm 10:31 PM 11-03-2005
I perfer birth though it does sound funny in the sentance "I birthed my baby". To be delivery sounds more medical, and birth sounds more emotional.
littlemama06's Avatar littlemama06 10:34 PM 11-03-2005
Thanks for writing this cause i was saying delivered but after reading this and giving it some thought, I am going to now say birthed! It sounds like "delivered" is something done to you or for you, "birthed" is something you do.

Kaitlin
danav's Avatar danav 11:22 PM 11-03-2005
It bugs me to hear people call it "delivery" even though it's SUCH a common term for birth. It makes me think of the mindset that being pg is an illness from which you must be saved, or delivered...or that by having your baby "delivered" you are being relieved of something that was wrong. I'm quite sure that many, many people who use the term aren't really thinking that way, but that's just what the word puts in MY head. I give birth - I don't deliver a baby nor am delivered of my baby.
georgia's Avatar georgia 11:43 PM 11-03-2005
Birth!

Delivery gives me the willies.


sarahlynne's Avatar sarahlynne 12:33 AM 11-04-2005
Birth. If anyone "delivers" the baby anyway it is the mother. Others might catch the baby, but isn't it really the woman who is doing all the work? I like the point about pizza, too
applejuice's Avatar applejuice 03:03 AM 11-04-2005
I voted birth since it is such a very unique experience.

Nothing in the world like it at all.



When I had my first baby, I was given a EDC, "expected day of confinement" - to a bed, I assume, but it still sounds like a prison.

By the time I had my fourth baby, I was given a EDD, "expected day of delivery" - like the postman was coming or something......
JanetF's Avatar JanetF 03:04 AM 11-04-2005
Yep I'm with the team, delivery is done by couriers not mothers and definitely NOT doctors.

Quote:
I also prefer the term "c-section birth" rather than "c-section delivery." "My baby was born via c-section" or "I had a c-section birth" sound different than "It was a cesarean delivery."
In Australia the medical mob refer call it "vaginal delivery" but "caesarean birth". Go figure...
Storm Bride's Avatar Storm Bride 03:18 AM 11-04-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanetF
In Australia the medical mob refer call it "vaginal delivery" but "caesarean birth". Go figure...
Sugar coating...
2+twins's Avatar 2+twins 03:19 AM 11-04-2005
I can't stand the term "delivered"! That's gotta be one of my biggest pet peeves. This includes the always asked question, "Who delivered (or who will deliver) your baby?". Ugh!!! I'm like, *I* gave birth to my baby, so-and-so attended the birth. And yes, I totally use the term, "I birthed my baby." My mom tends to roll her eyes when I say things like that. She thinks I'm weird.
Persephone's Avatar Persephone 03:32 AM 11-04-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by applejuice

By the time I had my fourth baby, I was given a EDD, "expected day of delivery" - like the postman was coming or something......
Heh. I always thought EDD stood for "estimated due date". I like my version better.
Ruthla's Avatar Ruthla 03:40 AM 11-04-2005
I remember, during my last pg, joking about all the free midwifery services offered by the local delis restaurants- hey, they were all advertizing "free home delivery."

It's birth. Do we celebrate birthdays or deliverydays?

happy deliveryday to you
happy deliveryday to you,
happy delivery day to whoever,
happy deliveryday to you.

I don't know, it just doesn't seem to have the same ring to it!

ETA: I thought "EDD" stood for "estimated due date" which I guess makes it sound like the baby is a library book or something- do you pay fines to your uterus if you go past 40 weeks?
applejuice's Avatar applejuice 04:07 AM 11-04-2005
O.K., but I am only parroting what I was told..., I do like "estimated due date" better.
babacyd's Avatar babacyd 06:30 AM 11-04-2005
Definetely birth, I can stand the word delivery for giving birth. ANIKO
cathicog's Avatar cathicog 01:01 PM 11-04-2005
It is always birth to me, as semantics is extremely important in midwifery and childbearing. How we get our messages across can mean the difference between happy fulfilling births and major abdominal surgery, which, btw, is how I refer to Cesareans. Also as cesarean Operations...just so people wont think of it as birth....Remember Pound Puppies? I think that was a brilliant marketing tool for surgeons....
OnTheBrink's Avatar OnTheBrink 01:04 PM 11-04-2005
Definitely birth!

Quote:
Originally Posted by tinyshoes
I also prefer the term "c-section birth" rather than "c-section delivery." "My baby was born via c-section" or "I had a c-section birth" sound different than "It was a cesarean delivery."
My daughter was born by cesarean. Hers was a birth that involved surgery. Born/birth must always come first. It's the same way that we know not to say "blind boy", we say "boy who is blind." It's about accentuating the truly important part - the birth and the boy!

Great poll question!
tinyshoes's Avatar tinyshoes 01:07 PM 11-04-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by cathicog
It is always birth to me, as semantics is extremely important in midwifery and childbearing. How we get our messages across can mean the difference between happy fulfilling births and major abdominal surgery, which, btw, is how I refer to Cesareans. Also as cesarean Operations...just so people wont think of it as birth....Remember Pound Puppies? I think that was a brilliant marketing tool for surgeons....
hmmmmm interesting...a cesarian operation. My only worry would be that such a term would make c-section mamas : .

Sometimes, if I'm really mad about a friends cruddy vaginal birth in a hospital, I'll say she was delivered, 'cause that's how I'd describe injustice that was done to her To steal a birth is to deliver, hunh?

Please explain more about the Pound Puppies...I don't remember what made them a marketing tool...
tinyshoes's Avatar tinyshoes 01:13 PM 11-04-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by OnTheBrink
Definitely birth!



My daughter was born by cesarean. Hers was a birth that involved surgery. Born/birth must always come first. It's the same way that we know not to say "blind boy", we say "boy who is blind." It's about accentuating the truly important part - the birth and the boy!

Great poll question!
oh yeah! Good point!

So what about "born by cesarian operation?" would that irk you, or be an accurate description for the enormity of abdominal surgery (I am pro-homebirth, not anti-c-sec....and I am definitly anti the prevailing attitude that a c-sec is "no big deal" because it's common nowadays. IT'S abdominal surgery!!! that's huge! owie!!!!!)
h82bwrong's Avatar h82bwrong 01:13 PM 11-04-2005
I usually say "I delivered" when talking about my own role in the birth, but when talking about my midwives, I refer to them as assisting the birth, or helping me deliver.
OnTheBrink's Avatar OnTheBrink 01:25 PM 11-04-2005
"Born by cesarean operation" is fine - it is what it is.

I also hate the phrase "cesarean moms" or the like. Again - I'm a mom who happened to give birth surgically.
LoveChild421's Avatar LoveChild421 01:46 PM 11-04-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by danav
It makes me think of the mindset that being pg is an illness from which you must be saved, or delivered...or that by having your baby "delivered" you are being relieved of something that was wrong. I give birth - I don't deliver a baby nor am delivered of my baby.
yep- I was getting my hair cut one day and the hairdresser and I were chatting about our babies and she asked "so who delivered him?" I just didn't know what to say, I just said "oh I gave birth at home"

I wonder when "birth" became "delivery"?
my great-grandmothers always said "birthed" (and they all birthed their babies at home) while my grandmothers use "delivered" (they had the classic early 60's knocked out, totally passive births). It almost seems like they hired the Dr. to do all the work and when they woke up the Dr. then handed them the baby- "here you go lady, congrats" not unlike pizza delivery...
nannymom's Avatar nannymom 01:50 PM 11-04-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noelia430
I prefer the term birth because pizzas are "delivered", not babies.
YEP!
jeanine123's Avatar jeanine123 01:54 PM 11-04-2005
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla
ETA: I thought "EDD" stood for "estimated due date" which I guess makes it sound like the baby is a library book or something- do you pay fines to your uterus if you go past 40 weeks?

I always thought it was Estimated Due Date too. As far as fines go isn't that called getting up to pee a hundred times a night at the end? I know, not exactly your uterus collecting the fine but I think the bladder has more right to it considering how squished it is by the end.

I much prefer the term birth. When I hear of delivery I think of the pizza guy.
gratefulbambina's Avatar gratefulbambina 01:58 PM 11-04-2005
I never really thought about it, but I would say birth over delivery. Also I think ppl that have a Ceserean Section still birthed a child & should be considered as such.
boston's Avatar boston 02:10 PM 11-04-2005
I have always found it uncomfortable to hear men talking about how they "delivered" their wives' babies. (As in, they caught them.) Or when a OB "delivers" the baby. Who delivered your baby? Oh, Dr so-and-so.

If they "delivered" the baby, that means they brought the baby to somewhere. The only ones, in my opinion, who really "deliver" the baby are Mama and God.
KittyKat's Avatar KittyKat 02:12 PM 11-04-2005
I read one of those horrid threads on an OB/GYN discussion board where the stupid doctor was trying to defend his anti-homebirth stance by saying "Home delivery is for pizzas"

I was thinking that was the smartest thing he said. If someone offered to "deliver" me from my baby at home, I'd kick 'em right out on their fanny. I give birth to my babies, no one "delivers" them. Some doctor or midwife may get lucky enough to "catch" but that's about it. I do all the work for nine months, go through all the labor and pushing why should the doctor get so much credit for managing to catch the baby? Please.

Kathryn
OnTheBrink's Avatar OnTheBrink 02:18 PM 11-04-2005
From the answers.com dictionary:

de·liv·er (dĭ-lĭv'ər)

v., -ered, -er·ing, -ers.

v.tr.
To bring or transport to the proper place or recipient; distribute: deliver groceries; deliver the mail.
To surrender (someone or something) to another; hand over: delivered the criminal to the police.
To secure (something promised or desired), as for a candidate or political party: campaign workers who delivered the ward for the mayor.
To throw or hurl: The pitcher delivered the ball.
To strike (a blow).
To express in words; declare or utter: deliver a lecture.

To give birth to: She delivered a baby boy this morning.
To assist (a woman) in giving birth: The doctor delivered her of twins.
To assist or aid in the birth of: The midwife delivered the baby.
To give forth or produce: The oil well delivered only 50 barrels a day.
To set free, as from misery, peril, or evil: deliver a captive from slavery. See synonyms at save1.


I always thought that "to deliver a baby" refered to the last part - to set free from misery (the pregnancy? baby? labor?). I always thought it was odd.
mamabearsoblessed's Avatar mamabearsoblessed 02:21 PM 11-04-2005
Yup- I always say birth too. and when other mamas are talking about being 'delivered' i say-= 'oh where are you planning to birth you baby?" or 'who will be at your birth?' instead of who will deliver or where are you delivering- that is a wicked pet peeve of mine too! it annoys me terribly.
ITA ON THE PIZZA ANALOGY.
YEP- 'SO WHO IS DELIVERING YOU AND WHERE?' well that'd be dr brown on main and we know we're having a cheese and pepperoni"
great poll
1 2  3 

Up