Did They Play the Radio During Your Cesarean? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
1  2
Birth and Beyond > Did They Play the Radio During Your Cesarean?
not now's Avatar not now 05:00 AM 04-01-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by TCMoulton View Post
Oh they do this where my girls were born and every time I heard the lullaby it brought tears to my eyes - you don't happen to work in Illinois?
Nope, CA.

Ironica's Avatar Ironica 05:39 AM 04-01-2008
The radio wasn't on when surgery started, but after they got past the first layer or so, and I started FEELING INTENSE PAIN, the anesthesiologist said, "Well, I can't turn the epidural up any higher; it would paralyze your lungs. Would you like me to turn on the radio?" Yeah, she was fairly useless. But we did get KROQ at our request. (Kinda glad it was a Sunday morning; I don't think I was in the mood for Kevin and Bean.) Oh, and the reception was fine in the OR, even though the hospital was built in the early 1970s or something.

The doctors talked to each other about the surgery; it was an attending demonstrating for a resident and an intern, so it was aaaallll business. They talked to me insofar as they needed to to verify that the anesthesia was working (for all the good that rigamarole did us), but from what both my husband and I recall, there was no "table talk" or even non-clinical narration. Maybe they were afraid to say too much, since they knew the gender was a surprise and that we wanted DH to have the honor of announcing.
ann_of_loxley's Avatar ann_of_loxley 06:36 AM 04-01-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Turquesa View Post
In the "Pushed" book, I read about a radio playing in the background during a woman's cesarean. Now I'm hearing anecdotally about women who have experienced the same thing.

I have never had a cesarean, and this is just me speaking. But I think that I would find it somewhat offensive, as though "working on" my uterus were no different than repairing my heating furnace or changing my car's oil. I can't imagine hearing commercials about car sales and fast food or the latest cell phone plan, or hearing some overplayed adult contemporary song . . . all during what should be the sacred and miraculous moment of birth.

Am I making sense here? I'm curious to hear from women who have had this happen.

They asked me if I would like any music. I hadnt thought about it up to that point - but I did! However, I had left the music that I wanted in the car! ... lol - Otherwise my son would have been born to Queen! lmao Up to that point thats what he was listening to hehe... But they had a box of music I could choose from - so he was born to classical music - beethoven to be exact
BetsyS's Avatar BetsyS 09:24 AM 04-01-2008
They played music in my c-section. If I have another, I'll request music again.

And, I'm an odd one. I like the chit-chat. I have a medical background, and I know that the idle chit-chat means everyone is all relaxed, and everything is going according to plan. Silence would make me ALOT more nervous. ALOT. Because, in my experience, usually silence means things are going wrong, nad everyone needs to concentrate to fix them.

But, I know that I'm a weird one.
DoomaYula's Avatar DoomaYula 11:45 AM 04-01-2008
During a friend's surgery, the nurses were talking about their lunch plans she was really annoyed.
Llyra's Avatar Llyra 03:59 PM 04-01-2008
No music with mine. With both, I had an anesthesiologist holding one hand and DH the other, and both of them talking to me to help me stay focused and calm. The docs talked to each other, but very quietly so that I couldn't really hear-- I don't know whether it was about the surgery, or about their roommates and where they were doing lunch. It could have been either. But on the whole, everybody was very respectful and attentive to me.
Chryseis's Avatar Chryseis 04:00 PM 04-01-2008
I don't think they played music during my section, but I honestly didn't notice. I think unless it was something I hated that I would have appreciated it, some of the instruments sounds and such are a bit disconcerting.

While there wasn't music, there was a lot of talk going on in the room while it was happening, but most of it was toward either me or my husband. I was very fortunate, everybody in the room was very relaxed and kept the atmosphere relaxed and pretty joyous on the whole. There was a lot of laughing, joking and discussion about the baby and a TON of baby weight guessing. After the baby was born there was a lot of talk about the baby and her size. We all talked about names (we were pretty undecided). My anesthesiologist actually took all of our first baby pictures (he had an assistant with him, he didn't abandon his job or anything). My husband was a bit shell-shocked about the whole thing (he's pretty squeamish and was afraid of seeing anything) and would have never thought to take pictures so the extra photography help was great.
Storm Bride's Avatar Storm Bride 05:17 PM 04-01-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by BetsyS View Post
And, I'm an odd one. I like the chit-chat. I have a medical background, and I know that the idle chit-chat means everyone is all relaxed, and everything is going according to plan. Silence would make me ALOT more nervous. ALOT. Because, in my experience, usually silence means things are going wrong, nad everyone needs to concentrate to fix them. .
To me, being in the OR in the first place means something that gone wrong. There really isn't anything the OR staff can do to put me at ease, because the environment and the experience both terrify me. It gets worse every time. (I'm really scared of having my next one.) Honestly, during both the planned sections, I found myself thinking something would go horribly wrong, and I'd just die...had to remind myself that leaving my babies without a mom wasn't a desirable result (and trust me - it was hard, because I thought they deserved better than mom who didn't have the courage to give birth in the first place).

Besides...imo, everybody freaking "needs to concentrate" when they've got my body cut open in front of them, anyway. I really don't give a crap how routine it is for them. If they want to push women into sections, the least they can do is take them seriously while they're doing them. In fairness, though, the talking when I've been in OR has been all business - but it's bad enough knowing what they're doing to me, without having to listen to them talk about it.
Storm Bride's Avatar Storm Bride 05:22 PM 04-01-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chryseis View Post
After the baby was born there was a lot of talk about the baby and her size.
I never want to hear another word about the size of my babies. The nursing staff got weird about dd and ds2, and it drove me nutty. I also wasn't fond of the "it's a good thing I pushed you - he never could have come out the other way" remark from the OB with ds2. (By "pushing you", he was referring to his threat to drop me from care - made the day before, at 41w, 4d, when I'd been having prodromal labour for over a week.) I'd really like them to shut up about baby size, but I do'nt think they will.
Ceinwen's Avatar Ceinwen 05:23 PM 04-01-2008
I agree with the pp that chit chat is relaxing - for *me* anyway.

I'm a soon to be RN, and I had a planned, very necessary c-section for my last babe.

The radio was on, but it's always on in that OR. They asked if I minded, and it totally didn't matter to me.

I ended up chatting with the anesthesiologist and the OB about their Christmas plans.

The only time things got hazy was when my pressure dropped to about 60/30 and I was blacking out. They pumped me with normal saline and it came right back up.

Very, very big hugs to everyone who had a traumatic experience. gy
Turquesa's Avatar Turquesa 12:44 PM 04-02-2008
Music can be very therapeutic in these circumstances, especially if the mother consents and gets her preferences honored. But personally I wouldn't want to hear in the background: "Billy Bob's got a used car sale going on and its big big BIG!!!!" It's all about the individual mother wants. The big deal for me is not to treat it callously. Thanks for sharing your stories.
rmzbm's Avatar rmzbm 06:24 PM 04-02-2008
Yeah, during the first, second, and last they had it. I didn't mind though. It was a really relaxed atmosphere with alot of joking, laughing, etc. I can see how a mother would be offended by it though. They shouldn't play the radio automatically, out of respect for the occasion. I just, personally, didn't care. During my third she was too busy screaming about tying my tubes against my will to turn it on I guess.
lmans77's Avatar lmans77 07:34 PM 04-02-2008
Mine played very soft classical music. It was lovely and soothing
sunnymw's Avatar sunnymw 08:24 PM 04-02-2008
My old HS band director relayed several times the story of his wife's c/s's--two preterm and very traumatic.

He said he could see the DR's hands over top of the curtain gesturing while they had conversation. One was about one of the guys' daughters getting in trouble the day before. The second was something about car maintenance.

I'd rather have the radio, personally. He said it freaked him out a good bit, and this is a man that does NOT get freaked out.
ColwynsMommy's Avatar ColwynsMommy 06:09 PM 04-03-2008
Do you think that in *some* circumstances (not all), they chit-chat and play music to distract the patient? I've had several procedures done where they've played music specifically so I don't hear what's going on, and other minor things where the doctor or whoever is chatting with me about unrelated stuff in an obvious attempt to ease my anxiety.

I mean, clearly they should respect the patient's wishes, and if the patient doesn't want the radio on or small talk, then there shouldn't be any. But I think in some cases, they assume that most mothers would prefer the distraction and don't know right off the bat whether a patient doesn't (especially if she doesn't say anything about it).

I know some OBs and hospital staff are rude, and those aren't the ones I'm talking about. I'm talking about the well-meaning people who are trying to make it easier on the patient.

Oh, and about the lullaby being played when babies are born.. the two hospitals around here both do something similar.. they play it throughout the whole hospital.
intorainbowz's Avatar intorainbowz 08:01 PM 04-05-2008
There was no music on during mine. I would not have minded it. Next time I'm bringing some. I talked with my doc and she told us what she was doing and let DH watch. I don't remember them chit chatting, but would not have minded it.
LemonPie's Avatar LemonPie 10:08 PM 04-05-2008
Quote:
During a friend's surgery, the nurses were talking about their lunch plans she was really annoyed.
A friend of mine was in for an emergency c-section and the surgeon was complaining about the registration fees for his Hummer :
bright-midnight's Avatar bright-midnight 11:00 PM 04-05-2008
Nope. No music playing, but they sure did chat enough.
cj'smommy's Avatar cj'smommy 12:05 AM 04-06-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by ColwynsMommy View Post
Do you think that in *some* circumstances (not all), they chit-chat and play music to distract the patient? I've had several procedures done where they've played music specifically so I don't hear what's going on, and other minor things where the doctor or whoever is chatting with me about unrelated stuff in an obvious attempt to ease my anxiety.

I mean, clearly they should respect the patient's wishes, and if the patient doesn't want the radio on or small talk, then there shouldn't be any. But I think in some cases, they assume that most mothers would prefer the distraction and don't know right off the bat whether a patient doesn't (especially if she doesn't say anything about it).

I know some OBs and hospital staff are rude, and those aren't the ones I'm talking about. I'm talking about the well-meaning people who are trying to make it easier on the patient.

Oh, and about the lullaby being played when babies are born.. the two hospitals around here both do something similar.. they play it throughout the whole hospital.

I think so too, I know the OB doing my section was doing that. She talked with us the whole time, only stopping to explain some things to the resident that was with her.
christyc's Avatar christyc 12:09 AM 04-06-2008
During my cesarean, the doctor had "Let's Give Them Something to Talk About" by Bonnie Raitt playing on autorepeat the entire time. Never once asked me if I was okay with it. And they talked about the weather, and sports, loudly, the entire time I lay there on the table, strapped down and crying.
its_our_family's Avatar its_our_family 12:19 AM 04-06-2008
When my second ds was born they talked about my OBs upcoming trip to Africa. Her and her wife had started a OBGYN clinic and they were going for the third time in the last 6 months. She was getting ready to retire and they were moving to Africa. It was a good conversation that they had WITH me not AROUND me. I had told them before hand I was a talker and I was ok if they were talkers. We got to ask her all sorts of questions. I had a lot of scar tissue to get through. Then once they got to B it was all business. We also talked about her battle with breast cancer and she talked about how losing her breast was freeing for her. She also talked about trying to lower the c/s rate where she was going. She talked about how the c/s rate was too high in the US. She was the only one in her office that truly support my desire for a VBAC but then understood when I decided to go another path. I really liked her. A lot.

With my first it was too traumatic to remember much. I seriously doubt there was music. I was sectioned by an intern and I would like to think that he was concentrating and didn't want the distraction.
Storm Bride's Avatar Storm Bride 03:02 AM 04-06-2008
Quote:
Originally Posted by its_our_family View Post
With my first it was too traumatic to remember much.
It's funny. I remember OR so clearly - the pattern on the border wallpaper, the drape, the lights, the table...but I really don't remember details from the surgery very well. I remember people talking. I remember a few bits and pieces, because they hit home (comments about the actual surgery, the tugs and "pressure", the fact that the anesthesiologist and dh were the only people in there who seemed to have a clue that I was a human being, and a terrified one at that). Mostly, I just remember being terrified, wanting to die and wondering why this was happening again (I was under general for the first one). I can't remember dd's first sounds, and I barely remember "holding" her in OR - just from the pictures. I remember a little more with ds2, but not much. I'll never forget the two cesareans when I was awake...but I honestly don't remember them very well.
marzanmama's Avatar marzanmama 12:28 PM 04-06-2008
The anthesthesiologist put on "Amy" by Creedence Clearwater Revival, which was a nice touch (That's my name). Except he said it was by the Allman Brothers and my dh had to correct him and it became this whole big conversation. But honestly, I didn't mind, it took my mind off things.
muttmom92's Avatar muttmom92 05:41 PM 04-07-2008
I don't think music was played at either of my sections (2 different hospitals). I can't really be sure though because I was too busy sobbing and vomiting from the meds to really notice something like music.
MommytoTwo's Avatar MommytoTwo 07:09 PM 04-07-2008
No they didnt. During my first one they were discussing the "D.C. Sniper" .. lovely. I am still pissed off about that.

During my 2nd and 3rd there was no real discussion other than pertaining to the surgery and telling us what was going on.
MissE's Avatar MissE 07:26 AM 04-08-2008
I don't remember but I don't think there was any music playing. In fact, I think it was rather quiet and everybody was concentrating on their work. It was 1am and they were probably tired though so there was no time for smalltalk. My mom works as an OR nurse and I know that they have classical music playing during surgeries.
potatocraft's Avatar potatocraft 05:58 AM 04-09-2008
As for the lullaby at birth thing, i remember hearing the lullaby when I had my last miscarriage and i was waiting to go in for my D&C and it just broke me. The nurse came over and couldn't understand what was so wrong.
But I know that when I finally have this baby in July that lullaby will sound so amazing to me.
Shawna
Julia'sMom's Avatar Julia'sMom 05:30 PM 04-10-2008
My dd was born at 5 in the morning, which I think was the end of the shift for our ob. The ob snapped at the nurses to turn off the music as soon as we entered the or. He even snapped at the anathesialogist to turn off her beeping machine, which she of course refused to do since it was monitoring me. All in all, there was no small talk. The nurse announced when the baby was born and the "baby doctor" announced that she was fine and healthy. It was the anesthisialogist that got me thru by narrating everything and making sure I was ok. She was the only one to treat me as human, and I'll always be grateful for that.
titania8's Avatar titania8 05:34 PM 04-10-2008
there was some nice soft music playing--a CD. we actually really liked it, it was relaxing. when we mentioned that to the OB that we appreciated it, she said she likes to play it to help her relax, or something like that. so it wasn't for ME, but it was nice.
1  2

Up