Seeking thoughts and opinions from experienced doulas/doulas in training - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 30 Old 04-11-2007, 05:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm new to these boards, and did a quick search, but if this topic is covered already and someone wants to direct me to that thread, I'd be thrilled!

If there isn't a thread already, I'm looking for information. I am getting ready to dive into the field of the birth professional, and wanted to start with doula certification. I'm new to the state, but have found that Oregon has a wealth of options when it comes to this. I'm trying to decide whether to take 8 weeks of classes (and met other requirements) at a local midwife school or whether to take a weekend workshop offered by ALACE (actually offered out of state, but in my former hometown over a weekend I was planning on being there for a visit). Part of me really wants to take the workshop because of time issues. I will have to drive 90 minutes or so each way for each of the 8 classes, and with a full time job, 2 kids, and a husband, that's a lot of extra time vs. a weekend workshop. On the other hand, I think I will probably consider certifying for at least the CBE at the midwife school, and am not sure how the out of state training will work. I think I have weeded out many of the pros and cons to each program, but I'd love thoughts and opinions from those of you who've BTDT.

Longer term, I'd like to also get CBE certified and eventually persue training as a midwife, but those goals are a few years further down the road. Thanks in advance for any thoughts!

DH 8.31.02 DD #1 1.14.03 DD #2 7.26.05 DD #3 12.7.07
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#2 of 30 Old 04-11-2007, 08:13 PM
 
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I am taking Childbirth Internationals online course, but I am choosing that because I have a 9 month old and a weekend workshop or 8 weeks of classes would be out of the question for me. Have you looked at all the different organizations? And what their particular philosophies are? And decided which ones you flow with the best? ALACE is a very good one, but DONA is sorta the one that everyone knows best. CBI is getting their recognition wise, but there are a lot of different organizations. CBI has a chart that you can look at here.

http://www.childbirthinternational.c...omparisons.htm
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#3 of 30 Old 04-12-2007, 08:39 AM
 
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I chose ALACE because it jives most with my philosophy of childbirth. I am travelling out of state for the training. I am taking the slow road to certification though...

Heather
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#4 of 30 Old 04-12-2007, 10:03 AM
 
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I did my training through a midwifery school in Oregon. If I was going to do it all over again, I would go through ALACE instead. There was nothing wrong with the training I did, but I hear people raving about how much they loved their ALACE training. I didn't choose ALACE in the beginning because they didn't have any that were going to be soon or close to me at the time and I was applying for midwifery school and needed to have taken a doula training. But, if you have an ALACE training that will be convenient for you.... well, that is where I would go.

Erika, mama to three beautiful kids (plus one gestating), and wife to one fantastic man.

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#5 of 30 Old 04-12-2007, 11:49 AM
 
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For me, and it sounds like for you also, doula work was a stepping-stone to midwifery. As such, certification has never been a necessity for me. I got all the clients I needed (eventually) without getting certified. Now, most of my clients I didn't charge. At first is was that I was "in training" working toward my certification, and didn't feel ready to charge. Then I ended up getting clients refered by public health depts, who desperately needed a doula, but absolutely couldn't afford one. But I think even without certification, once you get a certain amount of experience under your belt, and several past clients who are willing to give you a good reference, potential clients will be able to figure out that you know your stuff and have something valuable to offer them regardless of your certification status, and will be willing to compensate you in whatever way they can. I've had clients who I've said, "It's totally your choice whether or not you want to pay me," and they have paid me.

My $.02. Hope it's useful.
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#6 of 30 Old 04-12-2007, 01:35 PM
 
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ALACE is the way to go for sure! And by the way, there will be an ALACE training in Memphis, TN (November 12-14th). Therese will be our trainer. I took an ALACE workshop back in 2001 and she was the trainer then too. It was so wonderful and I felt empowered as a doula! In addition to doula training, we learned things that are not in the scope of being a doula, and that is one of the conflicts amoung DONA and ALACE doulas. But ALACE clearly says that unless you receive further (advanced) training in FHT's, Fundal Height measurement and vaginal exams, you should not use this workshop as anything but an introduction to these skills. However, ALACE is empowering women to know that there is a gentle way to touch the women and this philosophy is shared by all ALACE doulas!

Everyone at our workshop in 2001 felt the difference in the touch taught at our workshop vs the touch expressed by doctors, nurses and others in the medical environment.

Good luck on your decision making!

Jyotsna

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#7 of 30 Old 04-12-2007, 03:50 PM
 
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Took the ALACE training and felt well prepared. Trust me, just because it's "only" a weekend long, don't worry that you won't get TONS of useful information. The books required, the reviews required by people at births, and the exam all make sure that you are well educated. I really think that ALACE is a great choice. Plus, it's a lot less stress being gone one weekend, as opposed to several nights. Have fun if that's what you choose...it's a great training!

Mama to two awesome kids. Wife to a wonderful, attached, loving husband. I love my job-- I'm a Midwife, Doula and Childbirth Educator, Classes forming now!

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#8 of 30 Old 04-12-2007, 04:53 PM
 
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I am certifying through DONA but, like other posters, wish I would have gone with ALACE. ALACE is more in line with my birth philosophy and I feel more comfortable with their doula-politics

Closely read the position papers, code of ethics and recommended reading of the organization you're considering. I didn't think that stuff mattered much, but it does!

-L
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#9 of 30 Old 04-12-2007, 10:43 PM
 
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Ooooh...I'm attending my ALACE workshop the first weekend in May--you guys have me all excited to go now!!
I chose ALACE, partially, because in comparing the certification processes, ALACE seemed to require a bit more (more births, more reading, an exam, et cetera). I hoped that their greater demands of *me* as a certifying doula would also be reflected in the quality of their instructors and workshops. It sounds like it is! Can't wait.
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#10 of 30 Old 04-12-2007, 11:28 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you all so much for your input!!! Its so helpful to get real life experiences, you know?!

hotwings640 You mentioned you did your training in Oregon - do you mind me asking which one? My one concern with certifying outside of the midwife school I'm looking at is there will be additional work I'll have to do if I want to use them for other programs.

Alison Cole I totally appreciate your perspective, too. I've noticed that some doulas don't do certification routes, and I can see the logic in that. The hands on experience is actually one of my concerns with doing a purely on-line certification - I, personally, think I'd rather do training in a different way (more hands-on, live experiences). I'm leaning towards a cert. program mostly because I'm not involved in the birth community around here at all, and being new to the state on top of that, I'm hoping that maybe doing a cert. program will help me develop a network of some sort. Again, thank you for sharing...it gives me even more to think about!

Quote:
it's a lot less stress being gone one weekend, as opposed to several nights.
This is what I'm hoping - since I'll be squeezing this in to go along with my teaching job, and the kids, etc., I'm figuring 1 weekend will be much easier to schedule in then 8 LONG evenings. And, the workshop I'm considering is in my former hometown, where I had planned to be visiting that week anyway. The timing couldn't be better - my mom will LOVE to have the girls, and if she can't watch them, my sister (and neice and nephew) will probably be itching for time with them. My only worry, concerning time, is that I'm supposed to host my little sister's baby shower on Saturday evening. Are conference times pretty standard? I was going to call the contact person and find out what the hours were - I'm really hoping there is some way I can do the workshop AND get to my sister's in time to host.

Anyway - thank you all so much for the helpful input!! I'm off to look up the link SabbathD provided and read up on some of the different philosophies of these groups to get a better idea if one is a more appropriate fit for me then others.

DH 8.31.02 DD #1 1.14.03 DD #2 7.26.05 DD #3 12.7.07
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#11 of 30 Old 04-13-2007, 11:53 PM
 
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Saturday usually goes pretty late, actually. You get an hour or so for dinner and then it's off again to class...until...8 or nineish? I think 8 is the schedule, but if there are questions, and there were tons (and good ones, too), it can go over. I kind of doubt you'd make it to host the shower. Is that the entire reason you are going in the first place? Can you do prep work before hand so that you still participate behind the scenes and still make it to the workshop? Hope so...it's really worth it!...but your sister will only have her baby shower once, too...

Mama to two awesome kids. Wife to a wonderful, attached, loving husband. I love my job-- I'm a Midwife, Doula and Childbirth Educator, Classes forming now!

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#12 of 30 Old 04-14-2007, 12:04 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Oh bummer! 8 would definately be too late. What about Sunday night? The good thing is we haven't actually set times for the shower, and I don't know if my sister is set on having it on the weekend. (Weekend works much better for my other sister, though...) I'd definitely be able to do most/all of the prep work ahead of time, and there are a lot of people willing to help. I'll keep working on it - we just got the money I'd need to pay for the workshop and I'm dying to register!

DH 8.31.02 DD #1 1.14.03 DD #2 7.26.05 DD #3 12.7.07
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#13 of 30 Old 04-25-2007, 03:17 PM
 
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I know this is an old-ish thread, but I hope the OP will see it... it's actually FRIDAY night that goes late. Saturday night you're out by 6 PM. Sunday sometimes runs a little later.
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#14 of 30 Old 04-25-2007, 04:33 PM
 
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Ehhhh, we ran really late Saturday night. Then ran late, too, on Sunday...didn't leave till two hours or more after we were planning to. Perhaps it's a group to group thing. We had only two of us who'd ever attended a birth besides our own (and we two had actually attended several), and a very large group to boot...so there were tons of tangents and questions. I got there an hour late on Friday(who knew that 60 miles is more like 120 minutes in Vermont? In Michigan it's 60 minutes or less...?), and the group was still only about 3/4 of the way through introductions. Not because Therese started late, either. It was just large, with chatty women...

again, though, that may be different group to group...

Mama to two awesome kids. Wife to a wonderful, attached, loving husband. I love my job-- I'm a Midwife, Doula and Childbirth Educator, Classes forming now!

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#15 of 30 Old 04-25-2007, 07:43 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Jyotsna View Post
ALACE is the way to go for sure! And by the way, there will be an ALACE training in Memphis, TN (November 12-14th). Therese will be our trainer. I took an ALACE workshop back in 2001 and she was the trainer then too. It was so wonderful and I felt empowered as a doula! In addition to doula training, we learned things that are not in the scope of being a doula, and that is one of the conflicts amoung DONA and ALACE doulas. But ALACE clearly says that unless you receive further (advanced) training in FHT's, Fundal Height measurement and vaginal exams, you should not use this workshop as anything but an introduction to these skills. However, ALACE is empowering women to know that there is a gentle way to touch the women and this philosophy is shared by all ALACE doulas!

Everyone at our workshop in 2001 felt the difference in the touch taught at our workshop vs the touch expressed by doctors, nurses and others in the medical environment.

Good luck on your decision making!

Jyotsna


I really am concerned with some of the misinformation that seems to be going on around the online world about the comparisons between ALACE and DONA International, not just here mind you. You can do whatever you are legally trained and certified to do in either organization. Neither organization trains you to do any medical procedures. DONA only says that if you are doing these medical assesments and procedures, that you are trained to do, call yourself a monitrice or something else because when you are working "AS A DOULA" and the general concensus of what a doula provides, doulas do not do anything medical. If you are a midwife acting as a doula and performing VE, then you are a midwife.

http://www.dona.org/aboutus/standards_birth.php

If doulas who are also health care professionals choose to provide services for a client that are outside the doula’s scope of practice, they should not describe themselves as doulas to their client or to others. In such cases they should describe themselves by a name other than “doula” and provide services according to the scopes of practice and the standards of their health care profession.

ALACE's Scope of Practice: http://www.alace.org/Scope.pdf

The inclusion of these experiential exercises serves only as an introduction to these subjects.
After attending the ALACE workshop, students are not qualified or trained to perform these
skills without additional or prior training.
Furthermore, ALACE certification does not cover
clinical or assessment skills such as palpation, fetal heart tones, or vaginal examination.

...if they are already a midwife, physician, or labor and delivery nurse or have
received specific training qualifying them to perform these assessments.
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#16 of 30 Old 04-25-2007, 08:20 PM
 
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Originally Posted by spedtchr View Post
hotwings640 You mentioned you did your training in Oregon - do you mind me asking which one? My one concern with certifying outside of the midwife school I'm looking at is there will be additional work I'll have to do if I want to use them for other programs.
.
Sorry I am soooooo late at answering this, I just saw it! I went through Birthingway College of Midwifery for my doula training.

Erika, mama to three beautiful kids (plus one gestating), and wife to one fantastic man.

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#17 of 30 Old 04-25-2007, 08:23 PM
 
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nak

did my dona rtaining in one weekend in portland. i liked getting all done right away, for sure! they are offered frequently, so if you did that you wouldn't have to worry about the shower... i looked into birthingway, but not offered as frequently and not a "recognized" certification program.

Ahh --nak all done.

So a training program was great for me, but really, I just needed to start going to births, now I don't know if I'll even turn in all my paperwork from the births. So far, no one ever cares about it, they just want to connect, click with their doula and know she's experienced and confident. They haven't cared what-so-ever about being officially certified. (But I have it all done, I should turn it in anyway... )

Best wishes! See you around!
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#18 of 30 Old 04-25-2007, 09:47 PM
 
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I didn't certify with anyone but did the workshops with both DONA and ALACE. The ALACE workshop is *awesome*. I'm considering hosting another one someday, just because I loved it so much. And I'm not even acting as a doula anymore. It was just really fun, really interpersonal and just all around fantastic. I chose not to certify because I found clients don't care one way or another and I didn't want to bother with the paperwork. If I ever go back to it, I might certify with ALACE, but I don't know for sure. With DONA you have to get birth attendants and nurses to sign things. It's a real PIA.

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#19 of 30 Old 04-26-2007, 01:32 AM
 
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I trained with both ALACE and DONA as well, although I haven't certified with either. I loved both trainings and was really happy I did both, for very different reasons. It is my understanding, (and maybe someone here can elaborate on this,) that the DONA trainings aren't completely consistent with one another, that they vary depending on your instructor, because they write their own trainings. I know for sure that my instructor did at least. I assume there is a basic outline they have to follow, but I believe there is room to add your own information as well.

I agree 100% that certifying isn't necessary, but sometimes I think about it in order to be included on the DONA referral list!

Mama to A born 8/7/99
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#20 of 30 Old 04-26-2007, 09:30 AM
 
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I am also training with both DONA and ALACE. I am certifying through DONA because DONA seems to be better recieved/known in my conservative area. Also, Penny Simkin conducted our local training workshop and I really wanted a chance to attend with her.

However, I have heard excellent things about ALACE, and have a feeling that they will totally jive with my philosophy. I'm going to attend an ALACE doula workshop in July, and am considering becoming a CBE through ALACE.

I think that exploring and affiliating through both organizations will keep benefit me in becoming 'well rounded', and increase my networking possibilities. I also think that you can't learn to much or be inspired too greatly, so as long as I have the time and $$ (barely ), and the trainings are in my area, why not go?
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#21 of 30 Old 04-26-2007, 12:16 PM
 
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B] Furthermore, ALACE certification does not cover
clinical or assessment skills such as palpation, fetal heart tones, or vaginal examination.
I just got my training folder several weeks ago and it does look that you do learn these skills. The peopleI have already spoken to have confirmed this, which is one of the reasons I chose them over the other orgs. If they do this then IMO you've got a leg up for midwife assisting or going to midwifery school having has this introduction. I don't know tha I'd ever choose to use those skills with a client, but even as an ALACE CBE I already teach palpatation.

ALACE also uses the name "Labor Assistant" as opposed to Doula (which literally meants servant).

Carrie, The Birthteacher CCE and Doula, real mom to five; and womb-mom to G. born at 23w by emergency C. 12/09
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#22 of 30 Old 04-26-2007, 06:38 PM
 
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Honestly, ALACE does NOT teach you do any of those skills. You DO them at the workshop, but under supervision--such as, the instructor might first palpate the fetus, and then show you "See, this is the back, can you find the head?"--that kind of thing. She helps you find the fetal heartbeat and count hearttones. She walks you through an exercise in finding pelvic anatomy.

You couldn't walk out of the workshop and do any of these things on your clients. You have to get further training (which ALACE doesn't offer, but the manual suggests some ways to pursue further education if you want it).

I think ALACE is great and the hands-on learning opportunities are wonderful! But you aren't trained to use them in practice.

(just finished my second ALACE workshop)
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#23 of 30 Old 04-26-2007, 06:45 PM
 
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I just got my training folder several weeks ago and it does look that you do learn these skills. The peopleI have already spoken to have confirmed this, which is one of the reasons I chose them over the other orgs. If they do this then IMO you've got a leg up for midwife assisting or going to midwifery school having has this introduction. I don't know tha I'd ever choose to use those skills with a client, but even as an ALACE CBE I already teach palpatation.

ALACE also uses the name "Labor Assistant" as opposed to Doula (which literally meants servant).
Another doula wrote and asked for clarification. She gave me permission to repost it here.

Quote:
Since there are so many mixed understandings of what ALACE believes to be their scope of practice I decided to write to them directly.

This is what I wrote:

I would like to know what your organization classifies a doula as and if

your doula's can do things like blood pressure checks, vaginal exams and

fetal palpation. There is some debate in the doula world about this and

instead of listening to everyone else guess what your feelings are on these

things, I felt it was necessary to not assume and instead go directly to the

source! I would greatly appreciate understanding your organization better.

Thank you,

Julie


And the response:

Dear Julie:

Thank you for your interest in ALACE, the Association of Labor Assistants and Childbirth Educators. I greatly appreciate your direct approach; we at ALACE are aware of the misconceptions, and are always grateful for an opportunity to correct them.


A Labor Assistant—or birth doula—is a someone who provides physical and emotional support to a woman and her partner and/or family during labor and birth. She also provides information, encourages her client to make informed choices about her birth, and supports her client’s choices. Doulas do not typically provide physical assessments for their clients; we at ALACE believe this is the job of her client’s care providers—midwife, doctor, nurse, etc.


We do not encourage--and, in fact, discourage--Labor Assistants, or Birth Doulas, to perform any kind of physical assessments for their clients, such as vaginal exams, palpation of the fundus, listening for fetal heart tones, etc. We very clearly state this in our workshops, both verbally and written in a disclaimer statement that every workshop attendee is required to sign. The disclaimer states that the introductions to physical assessments are not to be considered as training for performing these services for their clients. If a Labor Assistant plans to provide these services, she must pursue further training from some other organization. While we discourage this practice, we do not actually ban or forbid ALACE trainees from it; we trust in the intelligence and good judgment of our members and do not feel it is appropriate to absolutely dictate what services they should not provide.


The reason for the common misconception about ALACE’s training is that, in our training workshops, we do provide an introduction to physical assessments. During the workshop, each attendee is given the opportunity to palpate the belly of a “pregnant model” (pregnant women that we recruit to volunteer for this purpose), listen to fetal heart tones, and try to determine the position of the fetus. We also include an exercise on vaginal exams that attendees perform on each other during the workshop. This exercise is optional.


Again, to emphasize the point, these experiential exercises are introductions to physical assessments, not considered as training to provide these services to clients. We have been including these experiential exercises in our workshops since our organization began as Informed Homebirth in the 70s. We believe strongly that they provide a level of experience and knowledge not available to most women, and that these experiences are very empowering to all our trainees. We have only received positive feedback (we request each attendee to complete feedback forms at every workshop) on these exercises. We feel that, by providing this sense of empowerment to ALACE members, this enables them to go out and pass on the empowerment to their clients. We also believe that this component of our training and the incredible sense of empowerment it brings to our trainees is one of the greatest reasons for the passionate loyalty to ALACE of our members.


I hope this has been able to clear up the issues for you. Please let me know if you have any more questions, and also feel free to pass this information on to anyone else you know who may not have a clear understanding! Thanks very much.


Jemma Boyle

Membership Coordinator

P.O. Box 390436

Cambridge, MA 02139

888-222-5223

617-441-2500 (MA residents)

www.alace.org
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#24 of 30 Old 04-26-2007, 10:26 PM
 
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Having taken the ALACE doula workshop, I can back up that though they do introduce basic physical assessment info, they in NO way advocate using these techniques as a doula, and they are very clear that this basic introduction does not qualify their trainees to perform vaginal exams, measure heart tones, or determine babies' positions. I was pregnant at the time so I sat out the vaginal exams, but the palpation and listening to fetal heart tones was VERY COOL. It definitely is a wonderful experience, and I'm glad they include it. There is no blurring of the lines IMO. ALACE is very clear that this is just an exercise in experiential learning, and not real "training" to do those things.

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#25 of 30 Old 04-28-2007, 12:14 AM
 
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I am an ALACE trained Labor Assistant/Birth Doula. I am getting my certification at CAPPA for my Post postpartum doula certification, and I am also going through the DONA certification later this year.

I am choosing to be certified in both programs for 2 reasons.
1) I feel ALACE is better in regards to what they teach because they have a set teaching manual, that has been created over the 30 years they have been in business. In DONA anyone can create a teaching manual and it just has to be approved. So you can never guarantee that you are getting 100% of what is available.
2) Dona is better at marketing, and that is no secret. But if I had to choose one it would still be ALACE.

PLUS- there are only 2 DONA trainers in my city, and one of them has NEVER been to an unmedicated birth! With the ALACE workshop, the trainer was a Midwife too, and had done everything from Hospital, Home, Water, Medicated, non medicated etc. The info, facts, and stats she gave me have come in handy so many times, I think it's what has kept me busy in birth & babies since the workshop!!!

Also above I mentioned that ALACE has been around since 1977, it was originally called "Informed Home Births" and has since changed names and executives. They were renamed Alace in 1995. just wanted to clarify that they have actually been around longer then DONA which started in 1992.
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#26 of 30 Old 04-28-2007, 02:20 AM
 
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Why would ALACE teach physical exams (to the minor extent...) if the do not condone them??
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#27 of 30 Old 04-28-2007, 07:27 AM
 
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Originally Posted by SDDoula View Post
I am an ALACE trained Labor Assistant/Birth Doula. I am getting my certification at CAPPA for my Post postpartum doula certification, and I am also going through the DONA certification later this year.

I am choosing to be certified in both programs for 2 reasons.
1) I feel ALACE is better in regards to what they teach because they have a set teaching manual, that has been created over the 30 years they have been in business. In DONA anyone can create a teaching manual and it just has to be approved. So you can never guarantee that you are getting 100% of what is available.
2) Dona is better at marketing, and that is no secret. But if I had to choose one it would still be ALACE.

PLUS- there are only 2 DONA trainers in my city, and one of them has NEVER been to an unmedicated birth! With the ALACE workshop, the trainer was a Midwife too, and had done everything from Hospital, Home, Water, Medicated, non medicated etc. The info, facts, and stats she gave me have come in handy so many times, I think it's what has kept me busy in birth & babies since the workshop!!!

Also above I mentioned that ALACE has been around since 1977, it was originally called "Informed Home Births" and has since changed names and executives. They were renamed Alace in 1995. just wanted to clarify that they have actually been around longer then DONA which started in 1992.
ALACE, the Labor Assistant training and certification, has only been around since 1995. Before, when it was IH, it was childbirth education.

http://www.alace.org/history.html

The Association of Labor Assistants and Childbirth Educators (ALACE) is a nonprofit educational organization formed in 1995 to promote and support the professions of childbirth education and birth assisting. It trains and certifies both childbirth educators and birth assistants (doulas, monitrices) through the programs developed and previously offered by Informed Homebirth/Informed Birth & Parenting.

Informed Homebirth (IH) was founded by Rahima Baldwin Dancy in 1977 in response to the need for information on how to prepare for a safe delivery at home; the original childbirth educator training program was developed in 1978. While most of the early IH teachers came from a homebirth background, they soon found themselves teaching hospital-bound couples as well. In 1981 the second name "Informed Birth & Parenting" was added so that pregnant women and couples could more readily identify instructors as having the information they wanted to know, regardless of where they were giving birth.
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#28 of 30 Old 04-28-2007, 12:55 PM
 
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Why would ALACE teach physical exams (to the minor extent...) if the do not condone them??
From what I have heard they don't teach physical exams..they give an introduction. I honestly don't see the difference other than they tell students that they cannot use the procedures on clients or discourage it. The only "benefit" I see to this would be to allow the doula to understand what the mom will feel and let her be included in the emotional aspect of clinical procedures on a client. It would also help them to inform their client how to do these things on themselves. The odd thing is that they don't practice vaginal exams on pregnant women, but instead on each other so they aren't even feeling what a pregnant laboring womans cervix is like anyway AND wouldn't it benefit them better to learn on themselves if they will be using that knowledge to teach their clients that want to know how to do checks on themselves?

From what I gather their scope of practice says that their labor assistants/doulas are discouraged to do clinical tasks BUT they leave it up to the individual doula to decide...not sure of the purpose of a scope of practice if the labor assistant herself gets to make the call on what she provides...just my opinion of course!
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#29 of 30 Old 04-28-2007, 01:58 PM
 
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It isn't really to teach clients how to check themselves, either. It's just to get a feeling of what the anatomy is like (along with the emotional components of the experience--for instance, seeing how different it can be when hands are kind and gentle).

I think the major think people need to understand is the UNRELATEDNESS between clinical vaginal exams during labor and the exercise we do at ALACE workshops.
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#30 of 30 Old 04-28-2007, 06:18 PM
 
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Again, to emphasize the point, these experiential exercises are introductions to physical assessments, not considered as training to provide these services to clients. We have been including these experiential exercises in our workshops since our organization began as Informed Homebirth in the 70s. We believe strongly that they provide a level of experience and knowledge not available to most women, and that these experiences are very empowering to all our trainees.
As far as I understand from what they say, they do it strictly for experiential reasons. Experiential simply means having the experience. It's so they can see what it feels like.
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