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#121 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 06:52 PM
 
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Originally Posted by felix23 View Post
It may have not been intended to attack people who bottlefeed, but the end result of how they have written it is that it does attack pumping and bottlefeeding mothers.
How??

http://www.who.int/nutrition/publica...de_english.pdf

What is a good way to tell formula feeding companies that it is not appropriate to market to new mothers without attacking those that may need or choose to formula feed?

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I don’t think it was written to ensure that companies whose entire branding depends on promoting breastfeeding to first-world women don’t also market bottles and nipples for breastmilk. This just seems to be a case of not seeing the forest for the trees.
I think we can all understand that in some countries the practice can have devastating affects. Babies have died from it.

The WHO Code is not just about promoting breastfeeding, it is about saving lives.

In some countries it is the only thing standing in the way of formula companies. Do people really want it rewritten just because Medela is great? How long would that take? Would that cost more lives?

This is very much about the forest.

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#122 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 07:02 PM
 
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So it's alright to engage in creepy stealth marketing as long as it doesn't appear to be doing the promotion of BFing any harm?
I don't think it's really stealth marketing, they encourage the mothers to disclose their affiliation, correct?

Really, I don't have a problem with companies saying, "Do you like our product? If so, tell others!" Offering incentives may be a bit of a stretch, but I don't think it's the worst thing in the world.

And the outrage at the ad? It shows a woman BFing. It also shows that there are bottles for her BFed child to drink what is obviously BM.

And it's about the baby getting breast milk, correct? Not breast milk only and always by the breast.

I do see the validity of criticism in this portion:
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5.5 Marketing personnel, in their business capacity, should not seek direct or indirect contact of any kind with pregnant women or with mothers of infants and young children.
But I think it's a stretch, because this code was developed for people marketing formula and formula products and other foods to children under 6 months. Can the bottles be used for formula? Yes, but it should be understood that these are for BF purposes.

I think this anti-Medela campaign is throwing the baby out with the bathwater.
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#123 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 07:06 PM
 
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For me, I think it's more a frustration with the state of things in the USA rather than a disagreement with the WHO Code. I love the WHO Code. But in a country where no one is expected to follow it, it's really frustrating to see a company I respect get called on breaking it, especially since they've done so much for breastfeeding mothers and babies. Part of me feels like if the only people talking about, displaying, and advertising bottles are the formula companies, then most of what's going to be in those bottles in formula.

On the other hand, I do have to wonder why they're feeling the need to fight this battle. Is what they gain financially worth alienating the lactivist community (or at least a big part of that community).

And I'll also admit that a small part of my trouble with this is that I don't like being told what to do or how to think. I don't identify as a feminist at all, and yet part of me bristles at the idea that pregnant and nursing women can't be trusted enough to be given information-- including information about bottles-- and make an intelligent decision. But I'm generally a contrary person, so this may not be a legitimate thing.

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#124 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 07:09 PM
 
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The post you quoted simply asked if some would feel differently if the Mavens were to focus on SNSs and pumps, nowhere did it or anything else that I'm aware of say that the Mavens are focused solely or mostly on promoting bottles.
That was poor wording on my fault. My question was, what if bottles were completely taken out of the equation. I didn't mean to imply they were solely focused on bottles. But what if instead they were told to talk up the pumps and collection supplies. Would it still be "sleazy marketing"? Is it sleazy because it involves bottles and the WHO Code, or is it sleazy because of the social networking aspect of it?

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#125 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 07:22 PM
 
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The WHO Code is not just about promoting breastfeeding, it is about saving lives.


A lot of posts are calling this discussion pointless, splitting hairs, anti-lactivist etc. but I actually see the call for changing the WHO code so that bottles can be marketed by a company that many US women happen to like and trust to be really uncharitable.

OK--so, let's take bottles out of the code. Then in places like Brazil (a country that currently enforces the WHO marketing code and has seen a rise in breastfeeding rates since doing so), big billboards of bottles (and maybe babies being bottlefed...not sure) could be plastered anywhere by any formula and/or bottle company. This could have profound health implications for many babies in a country with sanitation problems and many more very poor people than there are here in the US.

We are really missing the point here, the WHO code is NOT:

about banning bottlefeeding
about preventing moms from working
about making bottle feeding moms feel guilty

it IS about protecting breastfeeding babies WORLDWIDE from unethical marketing practices that influence how babies are fed. Period.

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#126 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 08:38 PM
 
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i'm sorry, i'm just having issues with the WHO anyway because they have botched several 'big' announcements lately.

i get that the WHO code is about saving lives. HOWEVER, doesn't the WHO also recommend feeding baby pumped mother's milk or donor milk as an alternative to breastfeeding at the breast? babies need to suckle and it's ridiculous to think that you can pump and NOT use an artificial container to feed the baby. even the sns is just a different form of a bottle.

so if you are going to impose a code that is about saving lives, wouldn't it seem logical to do WHATEVER it took to save that life?

additionally, have any of you shopped for bottles lately? it is overwhelming, to say the least. i don't see why it's such a big deal for medela to sell AND market their bottles. i like/trust their pumps and it would be even better and easier on my bf relationship (and the pumping) to have had a bottle that not only fit onto the pump but that i could also turn around and use to feed my baby with.

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#127 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 09:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by boobs4milk View Post

additionally, have any of you shopped for bottles lately? it is overwhelming, to say the least. i don't see why it's such a big deal for medela to sell AND market their bottles. i like/trust their pumps and it would be even better and easier on my bf relationship (and the pumping) to have had a bottle that not only fit onto the pump but that i could also turn around and use to feed my baby with.
Do you not have any that fit medela pumps?

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#128 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 09:33 PM
 
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To me, the simple fact that they state that their bottles are for breastmilk matters. I have some small Medela breastmilk bottles that have pro-breastfeeding things printed on them. One says "Breastfeeding is baby's best start" and one says "Breastmilk: from Mother with love." !
Just catching up to the thread since it's back....have to say, when I was working and pumping, I would have LOVED !!!!! to send my pumped milk to daycare in bottles that had pro-breastfeeding slogans on them !!! I mean, that would have been awesome !!! Mine was the only baby at that daycare getting pumped milk, and the teachers kept writing "formula" on his log sheet.....I reminded them over and over again "it's not formula".... just having bottles to buy with the pro-BF slogans on them would be enough for me to choose these ! (okay so I'm easily impressed )

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#129 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 09:37 PM - Thread Starter
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That was poor wording on my fault. My question was, what if bottles were completely taken out of the equation. I didn't mean to imply they were solely focused on bottles. But what if instead they were told to talk up the pumps and collection supplies. Would it still be "sleazy marketing"? Is it sleazy because it involves bottles and the WHO Code, or is it sleazy because of the social networking aspect of it?
For me it's sleazy because of the social networking aspect. Yes, I know they're telling these people that they should identify themselves as Mavens but are they really going to make sure that's happening or enforce it? At least with an ad you know that a company paid for it and who's behind it. With recruiting moms to target specific groups with the sole goal of talking up your product while also, hopefully, giving out good advice and support really rubs me wrong. I was checking out the Mavens newsletter and they have blurbs in there about specific members at specific boards and what their post is about, urging Mavens to go there and lend their insight (and product plugs??). They even include a link straight into the conversation. That just really, really, really rubs me the wrong way and makes my skin crawl. It's caused me to question any gushing or review or "Hey, guess what great customer service" or what have you about Medela and wonder if the person posting it is working as a Maven. Which really, really sucks IMO because I feel that Medela's products are really great and if you have a great product then it should be able to stand on it's own and not need to rely, even slightly on these types of marketing practices.
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#130 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 10:58 PM
 
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Well, social networking is the next big thing. Ethically, I think it opens up a lot of doors and it's something we're all going to have to take a good hard look at and figure out where it stands and what are limits are. But I don't think Medela should be penalized just because some people perceive it as being sleazy.

I was thinking about this as I was putting my little guy to bed. As a Lactivist, my absolute number one goal is to get breastmilk into babies. I really don't care if it's from a boob or a cup or a syringe or shooting like a fountain from my breast while my toddler tries to catch it from across the room. I get that straight from the tap is best, but on the grand continuum of breastmilk to formula to evaporated milk with karo syrup, I think any and all forms of breastmilk are squished together pretty closely at the top of the list.

I also understand that artificial nipples can damage breastfeeding relationships. I don't think nipple confusion is imaginary and I understand that it can affect older babies as well. I do think that waiting until a certain point (4-6 weeks is what's generally recommended) can seriously reduce the chances of that happening, but I won't pretend there aren't risks.

Likewise, I think there are risks to ignoring the fact that bottles are the easiest, cheapest, quickest, and most socially accepted way of getting pumped breastmilk into a baby. I think a mom working a minimum wage job is probably working pretty darned hard to pump at all without having to come up with new and innovative ways to get that milk into her baby without using a bottle. And I think that chances are that same mom isn't going to have the luxury of finding a child care provider willing to do anything but bottle feed the baby either.

We have some countries with dangerous water supplies, no money to buy formula once the "free" samples run out, disease and infection rampant, and breastfeeding saves lives. Literally. And glorifying bottles in those countries lessens breastfeeding rates.

Then we have other countries where mothers are faced with societal expectations to work outside the home, to leave the baby with others, and to use bottles. And making bottles taboo in those countries probably (I'll admit I have no hard proof or statistics) lessens breastfeeding rates, because it all seems too much of a bother.

So this is where I'm struggling with the WHO Code. IMO, it's not meeting everyone's needs and it's not fitting everyone's circumstances. I don't know what the solution is. I just know I find it a lot easier to get righteously indignant about Nestle dressing up formula reps as nurses to give "free samples" to women in third world countries and putting the same logo on their formula as they have on their coffee creamer than I get at Medela for showing a bottle and artificial nipple while promoting breastfeeding and encouraging women to pump breastmilk for babies. To me, it seems as if a "one size fits all" cookie cutter approach to the Code doesn't necessarily work for all countries.

This doesn't address the social media campaign, of course. But this is just why I am struggling with the advertising issues.

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#131 of 215 Old 01-20-2010, 11:05 PM
 
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And I'm sorry for writing a book.

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#132 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 12:50 AM
 
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but it's a good book!

I'll say it again. Working and breastfeeding is HARD. Really, really hard. I had 8 weeks of unpaid maternity leave (and it would have been 6 weeks had my homebirth not turned into a c-section transfer) and then had to leave my tiny little baby with Daddy to go back to work, then come home to baby alone all night while Dad worked. Pumping is hard work. I am so thankful that my PISA makes things easier and that Medela makes bottles that make the whole process smoother. Because I waste enough time every day cleaning bottles and pump parts.

I work with a lot of new mothers and without knowing about good breastpumps and bottles they would be formula feeding.

The SAHM never leave my baby never going to feed a bottle ideal is just so insulting to those of us living with no paid maternity leaves and no other way to pay for the roof over our heads. I'd LOVE nothing more than to stay home with my baby but I can't if I want him to have healthcare and food on the table. The hairsplitting over bottles pictures on boxes is just too much. Working, pumping moms are breastfeeding moms too. Thank God for companies like Medela that have such great products and great customer service. There is NO SUPPORT for working, pumping moms from any angle and I'm not going to nitpick a company to death who is getting more milk into more babies.
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#133 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 03:11 AM
 
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Then we have other countries where mothers are faced with societal expectations to work outside the home, to leave the baby with others, and to use bottles. And making bottles taboo in those countries probably (I'll admit I have no hard proof or statistics) lessens breastfeeding rates, because it all seems too much of a bother.
You're confusing issues here. I'll say it again: the WHO code has *nothing* to do with banning bottles. It only provides guidelines for the *marketing* of bottles (and a few other things).

Really, if Medela became WHO-code compliant tomorrow do you think American women would cease buying their bottles? You could still find them in the "yellow section" of Target ferpetessake! Right next to the pumps...which can be marketed aggressively.

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#134 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 08:06 AM
 
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As I couldn't even see the original link just this much:
even if some of the issues in this thread may sound like "hairsplitting", I still think it's important to put them on the table and be watchful. The WHO is the World Health Organization, and it's quite obvious that there were compromises to be made and that one size doesn't necessarily fit all.
Maybe we should all remember that - unless we are a manufacturer of bottles, teats, or baby food / formula (anyone around here?) - the WHO Code is NOT ABOUT US.

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#135 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 08:12 AM
 
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but it's a good book!

I'll say it again. Working and breastfeeding is HARD. Really, really hard. I had 8 weeks of unpaid maternity leave (and it would have been 6 weeks had my homebirth not turned into a c-section transfer) and then had to leave my tiny little baby with Daddy to go back to work, then come home to baby alone all night while Dad worked. Pumping is hard work. I am so thankful that my PISA makes things easier and that Medela makes bottles that make the whole process smoother. Because I waste enough time every day cleaning bottles and pump parts.

I work with a lot of new mothers and without knowing about good breastpumps and bottles they would be formula feeding.

The SAHM never leave my baby never going to feed a bottle ideal is just so insulting to those of us living with no paid maternity leaves and no other way to pay for the roof over our heads. I'd LOVE nothing more than to stay home with my baby but I can't if I want him to have healthcare and food on the table. The hairsplitting over bottles pictures on boxes is just too much. Working, pumping moms are breastfeeding moms too. Thank God for companies like Medela that have such great products and great customer service. There is NO SUPPORT for working, pumping moms from any angle and I'm not going to nitpick a company to death who is getting more milk into more babies.
congratulations on your baby and s for making bf work for you!

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#136 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 08:22 AM
 
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Do you not have any that fit medela pumps?
yes, i have bottles that fit the pumps. however, the rings and nipples are not bf friendly so i end up pumping into one container and pouring into another to feed. another nicu pumping mom was doing this and ended up spilling 10 cc's of her milk. she pumped for 45 mins and got 18 cc's. she was so distraught that she nearly fainted! how great would it have been for her to pump into a bottle and then cap it off with the appropriate ring/nipple and go straight to baby with it?

yes, medela is in violation of the code. yes the code helps protect babies. my concern is this: how is the code helpful to BREASTFEEDING if it only serves to protect some babies? i know a great many bf moms who would quit bf altogether if pumping was made any more difficult than it already is. i also know a great many MOMS who do not bf because they feel like it's too much work to pump. why not make pumping as easy as we can and GET MORE BABIES BREASTMILK?

no one seems to want to answer that. i know that several of us have made that point, but we just get thrown back to 'sleazy marketing' and 'the code saves lives.'

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#137 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 11:13 AM
 
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You're confusing issues here. I'll say it again: the WHO code has *nothing* to do with banning bottles. It only provides guidelines for the *marketing* of bottles (and a few other things).

I don't feel I am confusing issues at all. By saying that something can't be shown or talked about, you are, in fact, making it taboo. And perhaps there are places where it should be taboo. But perhaps there are also places where it should not.

ETA: Also, I never said it had anything to do with "banning" bottles.

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#138 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 11:49 AM
 
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yes, medela is in violation of the code. yes the code helps protect babies. my concern is this: how is the code helpful to BREASTFEEDING if it only serves to protect some babies? i know a great many bf moms who would quit bf altogether if pumping was made any more difficult than it already is. i also know a great many MOMS who do not bf because they feel like it's too much work to pump. why not make pumping as easy as we can and GET MORE BABIES BREASTMILK?
Medela following the WHO code would NOT make pumping any more difficult than it already is. Medela can still sell their bottles and nipples. They can still put the bottles and nipples in with their pumps and not be in violation of the code as long as the bottles are not pictured as feeding bottles on the box that the pump comes in. They can show a bottle attached to the pump, and they can write on the box that it comes with bottles and nipples (so you still know what you're buying). They can sell their bottles and nipples separately in stores as long as their MARKETING doesn't violate the WHO code. How does that make things more difficult? Medela being code compliant does not affect a mom's ability to pump her milk and bottle feed it to her baby.
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They explode, of course.

My Medela bottles have pro-breastfeeding messages molded right into the plastic. The two I happen to have with me today in my pump bag say "Breastfeeding: nature's perfect food" and "Breastfeeding best feeding." I know that one of the ones I have at home says "Mother's milk is #1." I forget what the other one says.
.
One thing that is strange though, is that these messages aren't on teh new bottles. the new bottles don't say breastmilk on them anywhere.

Also they do make 8 ounce bottles now too, where they didn't before.

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#140 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 11:54 AM
 
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I don't feel I am confusing issues at all. By saying that something can't be shown or talked about, you are, in fact, making it taboo. And perhaps there are places where it should be taboo. But perhaps there are also places where it should not.

ETA: Also, I never said it had anything to do with "banning" bottles.
Thank you for saying more clearly what I've been trying to say. People have asked how does banning the marketing of bottles shame pumping mothers, and the answer is that it does so making the very item that is needed (by the majority of moms who pump) to feed their babies, taboo.

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#141 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 12:01 PM
 
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Medela following the WHO code would NOT make pumping any more difficult than it already is. Medela can still sell their bottles and nipples. They can still put the bottles and nipples in with their pumps and not be in violation of the code as long as the bottles are not pictured as feeding bottles on the box that the pump comes in. They can show a bottle attached to the pump, and they can write on the box that it comes with bottles and nipples (so you still know what you're buying). They can sell their bottles and nipples separately in stores as long as their MARKETING doesn't violate the WHO code. How does that make things more difficult? Medela being code compliant does not affect a mom's ability to pump her milk and bottle feed it to her baby.

And THAT is what I have a huge problem with. Bottles being portrayed as they are most likely going to be used (as feeding devices) is nothing to be shamed or hidden. Sure, complying might not hurt their sales, but it would most certainly perpetuate the idea that pumping is great, but bottle feeding is bad. If bottle feeding pumped breastmilk isn't bad or something to be ashamed of, then why have all these rules banning the showing of a bottle as a feeding device?

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#142 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 12:14 PM
 
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If bottle feeding pumped breastmilk isn't bad or something to be ashamed of, then why have all these rules banning the showing of a bottle as a feeding device?
Well, I actually do understand why, if you were in a third world country where feeding a baby a bottle was automatically associated with formula and babies died from not being breastfed. And I don't know, maybe looking at it more globally, that's the case. Maybe among breastfeeding mothers in places like MDC, bottles = pumped breastmilk, but everywhere else bottles = formul. I don't know. I really keep going back and forth on this.

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Well, I actually do understand why, if you were in a third world country where feeding a baby a bottle was automatically associated with formula and babies died from not being breastfed. And I don't know, maybe looking at it more globally, that's the case. Maybe among breastfeeding mothers in places like MDC, bottles = pumped breastmilk, but everywhere else bottles = formul. I don't know. I really keep going back and forth on this.

I understand that too, but at the same time I spend a lot of time helping working mothers get information about pumping and trying to help them figure out how to work and pump and there are already so many obstacles to overcome, that it just frustrates me to see the WHO act like bottlefeeding is something to be hidden away. These women would love to get free bottles or coupons for bottles, especially bottles that are labeled for breastfeeding. The women I know who aren't even allowed time to pump during the day so they spend their entire commute hooked to pumps are pretty darn proud of their bottles, and it is insulting to them to say that showing bottles as feeding devices is bad.

If it is even possible, the WHO needs to find some way to take into account these type of breastfeeding mothers. Maybe it isn't possible to do that, but I just can't get upset with a company that does so much to help pumping mothers over something like this.

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#144 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 12:36 PM
 
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I don't disagree with the code. I understand why it is what it is. I also don't disagree with Medela choosing to violate it and clearly, openly advertise that they offer a complete feeding system to go along with their pumps, without tiptoeing around the issue. I won't think they are doing anything unethical or undermining breastfeeding in any way, as long as they advertise their bottles as being a feeding system to go along with their breast pumps. If they start to run ads with just the bottles, and no mention at all of breast pumps or breast milk, then I'll be mad at them.

I don't like the social media part of the Maven program, because I just really really don't like spam of any kind. I wouldn't be as annoyed by some kind of referral program involving discounts...but don't like the social media part of it.

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#145 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 12:45 PM
 
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If it is even possible, the WHO needs to find some way to take into account these type of breastfeeding mothers. Maybe it isn't possible to do that, but I just can't get upset with a company that does so much to help pumping mothers over something like this.
Yeah, this is pretty much where I am too. Sigh. I do love that the intent of everyone on this thread is just to find the best way to serve nursing mamas and babies. I've really appreciated having the space for the conversation. I think a huge part of activism is being allowed to think critically about this like this, even when it means taking a hard look at our own "side."

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#146 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 12:48 PM - Thread Starter
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Medela being code compliant does not affect a mom's ability to pump her milk and bottle feed it to her baby.
Especially since up until a year or so ago they WERE compliant. And I've been hearing people sing the praises about Medela and their pumps for over 6 years now.
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#147 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 01:01 PM
 
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There are 2 issues at play here. One is the violation of Medela of the WHO code by marketing bottles (or "breastmilk delivery devices" if they want to split hairs or get around the code.) The second is using social networking to promote their whole product line - which is not in violation of the code and is not limited to Medela. The first post and the original OP seemed to be expressing outrage about the violation of the code, but then it seems to have switched to outrage at social network marketing.

So, I've worked in Marketing and I was a full-time working and pumping mom and my DD bf for over 4 years, at which point I weaned her. I'd like to weigh-in on the first issue. My BF experience is about 6 years old at this point but I'll be doing it again in another few months.

As a working mom, I shelled out $199 for a mail order PIS, discounted from the usual $250 because the newer backpack model was coming out. I knew Medela was a good pump. I researched them and studied them and determined the benefits of the backpack model were more cosmetic than mechanical and old should style would be fine. I tried to submit an insurance claim for the pump but it was denised.

My pump came with 2 small - weird plastic collection bottles and there might have been a nipple. As a well-educated, researching kind of mom, I thought the 2 best bottles on the market were Avent and Dr. Browns. Why did I think this? Well, a lot of that was marketing, though I avoid a lot of media, especially magazines. And some of it was people on these boards talking about how good those bottles were. I didn't know ANYTHING about these weird Medela bottles that came with my pump. In fact, what I did know is that they were "freebies." And working in Marketing, I know companies often don't shell out big bucks for something they give away free with their product. The nipples looked weird - round - not shaped like babies mouth like Avent told me of their nipples. And the plastic was definitely a different kind than the Avent bottles. I didn't really trust those Medela bottles. I hadn't heard anything about them - no one talked about them. I shelled out for Avent bottles.

Now you have the whole collection issue. I sure needed more than one bottle for daycare. Once you start a bottle, if the baby doesn't finish it, they have to throw it away. So I must have been sending like 6, 2 oz bottles to day care. And I needed to collect in something. And if I froze milk, I needed something to freeze it in. I went through a lot of collection systems. Finally rubber banding little bags onto the horns. But there was HUGE danger of spillage with that.

Then, as my baby got older, I thought I needed bigger flow nipples and bigger Avent bottles, so I bought those. Then my providers told me baby was still hungry and I wasn't making enough milk. THEN I found out that sometimes BF babies just like to snuggle more and be held and it isn't that they are still hungry but that they just want to suck longer. So I switched BACK to newborn nipples.

Now, at the end of the day, it really would have been a LOT simpler if I had had Medela bottles- that attached to my pump, and with special slow-flow newborn nipples, that simulated MY nipple and if Medela could have TOLD me that. I am sure Medela is not ignorant of the fact that MANY well-educated, working, Medela owning moms are choosing Avent or Dr. Browns bottles for use with their pumps. And buying an adapter or simply "making" them work with their pump. I'm sure they would like to capture some of that lucrative bottle market. And the only way to do it is to advertise.

And yes, as a BF mom, I would have been THRILLED to have my little bottles at daycare labeled Mothers Milk, or Breast is Best, or even Liquid Gold - do not spill! And this would have done something to promote and normalize breasfeeding at a day care where over half of the 6 month-olds got formula.

I will address the social network aspect of the marketing in another post, but it is really unrelated to the WHO code.

Third generation WOHM. I work by choice.
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#148 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 01:08 PM
 
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I don't feel I am confusing issues at all. By saying that something can't be shown or talked about, you are, in fact, making it taboo. And perhaps there are places where it should be taboo. But perhaps there are also places where it should not.

ETA: Also, I never said it had anything to do with "banning" bottles.
OK, so I said ban and you said taboo. Sorry for twisting your words. That being said, in the context of our culture there is very little chance of bottles becoming banned or taboo in the foreseeable future regardless of Medela's actions.

Marketing is NOT just showing and talking about a product. It is designed to influence behavior. Bottles can still be on the shelves...right...next...to...the...pumps.

Can someone please explain how American women will be harmed by Medela not marketing their bottles and becoming code-compliant?

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#149 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 01:14 PM
 
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Can someone please explain how American women will be harmed by Medela not marketing their bottles and becoming code-compliant?
I think if Medela's financial situation is such that they feel the need to break the WHO Code to market their bottles, then American women and babies could be harmed if Medela no longer existed as a company. I think they do so much to promote breastfeeding, and I think that the breastfeeding movement would be greatly diminished if they no longer existed as a corporation.

I would really love to hear more about WHY Medela felt the need to do this. In these economic times, I personally find it hard to believe they would risk alienating the breastfeeding community without dire financial need, but I'm just speculating.

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#150 of 215 Old 01-21-2010, 01:23 PM
 
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I would really love to hear more about WHY Medela felt the need to do this. In these economic times, I personally find it hard to believe they would risk alienating the breastfeeding community without dire financial need, but I'm just speculating.

Since the whole BPA thing, I think people are paying a lot more for baby bottles than they once where (20 for a set of two bottles!) Maybe medela *is* trying to expand their customer base to include formula feeding moms, especially since medela can claim to have *always* been bpa free.

Their new bottles are sturdier, have better markings, and don't say 'breast' anywhere on the bottle.

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