Traditional Foods v. Real Foods v. Whole Foods - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 7 Old 10-26-2009, 04:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Traditional Foods v. Real Foods v. Whole Foods:
are these all the same thing? If not, how do they differ?
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#2 of 7 Old 10-26-2009, 05:19 PM
 
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Traditional Foods are whole, unrefined foods with special emphasis on how the food was raised and harvested as well as how it is prepared in the home. The goal is to ditch modern foods and to enjoy foods as they were eaten prior to the advent of industrial agriculture. This is why great emphasis is placed on how animals are fed, how grains are prepared and how much food is eaten raw or fermented. Traditional foods enthusiasts tend to be omnivores and veganism isn't generally considered in alignment with the traditional foods movement.

Whole Foods usually refer to foods that are in their unrefined state but there's little to no emphasis on how foods are prepared. Whole foods can be in alignment with vegetarian, vegan and omnivorous diets.

Real Food is usually synonymous with Traditional Foods thanks to Nina Planck's two books: Real Food and Real Food for Mother and Baby.

For example, whole grain sourdough bread would be fall under the categories of whole food, traditional food and real food. But, whole wheat spaghetti probably wouldn't be considered a traditional food because the grain in that spaghetti isn't prepared according to traditional methods.

None of this is hard and fast, as you can imagine. What matters is not how you label what you eat, but that you strive to eat well and in a way that feels optimal for your body.

I blog traditional foods and Weston A Price at Nourished Kitchen. See my healthy recipes.
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#3 of 7 Old 10-26-2009, 08:34 PM
 
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what a great explanation! thanks!!

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#4 of 7 Old 10-27-2009, 12:10 AM
 
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Traditional foods also seems to have an emphasis on high fat, vs whole foods can mean low fat.

Happily married to DH for 6 years, in process to foster-adopt 3 children DD4, DS3 and DS2. We may be bringing half brother age 9 one day as well! We are not infertile, we just have decided that since there are precious children who need homes there is no need for us to have biological children.

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#5 of 7 Old 10-27-2009, 12:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowbunny View Post
Traditional Foods are whole, unrefined foods with special emphasis on how the food was raised and harvested as well as how it is prepared in the home. The goal is to ditch modern foods and to enjoy foods as they were eaten prior to the advent of industrial agriculture. This is why great emphasis is placed on how animals are fed, how grains are prepared and how much food is eaten raw or fermented. Traditional foods enthusiasts tend to be omnivores and veganism isn't generally considered in alignment with the traditional foods movement.

Whole Foods usually refer to foods that are in their unrefined state but there's little to no emphasis on how foods are prepared. Whole foods can be in alignment with vegetarian, vegan and omnivorous diets.

Real Food is usually synonymous with Traditional Foods thanks to Nina Planck's two books: Real Food and Real Food for Mother and Baby.

For example, whole grain sourdough bread would be fall under the categories of whole food, traditional food and real food. But, whole wheat spaghetti probably wouldn't be considered a traditional food because the grain in that spaghetti isn't prepared according to traditional methods.

None of this is hard and fast, as you can imagine. What matters is not how you label what you eat, but that you strive to eat well and in a way that feels optimal for your body.

Great post - Thanks!

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#6 of 7 Old 10-27-2009, 12:19 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowbunny View Post
Traditional Foods are whole, unrefined foods with special emphasis on how the food was raised and harvested as well as how it is prepared in the home. The goal is to ditch modern foods and to enjoy foods as they were eaten prior to the advent of industrial agriculture. This is why great emphasis is placed on how animals are fed, how grains are prepared and how much food is eaten raw or fermented. Traditional foods enthusiasts tend to be omnivores and veganism isn't generally considered in alignment with the traditional foods movement.

Whole Foods usually refer to foods that are in their unrefined state but there's little to no emphasis on how foods are prepared. Whole foods can be in alignment with vegetarian, vegan and omnivorous diets.

Real Food is usually synonymous with Traditional Foods thanks to Nina Planck's two books: Real Food and Real Food for Mother and Baby.

For example, whole grain sourdough bread would be fall under the categories of whole food, traditional food and real food. But, whole wheat spaghetti probably wouldn't be considered a traditional food because the grain in that spaghetti isn't prepared according to traditional methods.

None of this is hard and fast, as you can imagine. What matters is not how you label what you eat, but that you strive to eat well and in a way that feels optimal for your body.
Thanks for the excellent descriptions!

Thanks, OP, for asking the question! I've been wondering the same thing...

"Kind words can be short and easy to speak, but their echoes are truly endless." - Mother Teresa

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#7 of 7 Old 01-17-2012, 11:43 AM
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by snowbunny View Post

Traditional Foods are whole, unrefined foods with special emphasis on how the food was raised and harvested as well as how it is prepared in the home. The goal is to ditch modern foods and to enjoy foods as they were eaten prior to the advent of industrial agriculture. This is why great emphasis is placed on how animals are fed, how grains are prepared and how much food is eaten raw or fermented. Traditional foods enthusiasts tend to be omnivores and veganism isn't generally considered in alignment with the traditional foods movement.

Whole Foods usually refer to foods that are in their unrefined state but there's little to no emphasis on how foods are prepared. Whole foods can be in alignment with vegetarian, vegan and omnivorous diets.

Real Food is usually synonymous with Traditional Foods thanks to Nina Planck's two books: Real Food and Real Food for Mother and Baby.

For example, whole grain sourdough bread would be fall under the categories of whole food, traditional food and real food. But, whole wheat spaghetti probably wouldn't be considered a traditional food because the grain in that spaghetti isn't prepared according to traditional methods.

None of this is hard and fast, as you can imagine. What matters is not how you label what you eat, but that you strive to eat well and in a way that feels optimal for your body.


I was coming to ask the same question as the OP. Gotta love that search feature!

 

Thank you so much for the rather succinct and easy to understand description of their differences!  thumb.gif


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