Let's Move! Campaign - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 11 Old 03-26-2010, 12:12 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I think that overall, Michelle Obama has a good campaign with the Let's Move! plan. Getting moms to cook, addressing the 'food deserts', getting kids moving around, etc. But I was so surprised to see that she's still recommending low-fat and fat-free items. Tub margarine? Egg substitute? Bagel without butter is better than bagel with butter? It's a very high-carb plan she's recommending. I'm not about to start suggesting TF foods for mainstream america - the jump would be too big. But I've been reading for long enough now about the importance of healthy fats - for example, that vegetables with butter on them are more absorb-able than vegetables without butter - that I'm surprised that someone as educated as she is would still be touting those old ideas.

Here's a specific example: One of her 'GO foods' (anytime) is a whole wheat bagel. Her 'SLOW' (occasionally) suggestion a bagel with jelly. Her 'WHOA' reference was bagel with butter and jelly.

Here's the website: http://www.letsmove.gov/choices/index.html

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#2 of 11 Old 03-28-2010, 01:25 AM
 
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And let's face it, the whole "accessing healthy & affordable food" section is a crock. So what if someone lives more than a mile away from a supermarket?! There's plenty of "access" to food in the U.S. (both good and bad) -- that's part of the problem! It's not like there are many people out there who don't know an apple is better for you than a snack bag (or four) of chips. And if it makes economic sense for convenience stations to sell healthier foods or for communities to hold farmers' markets, they do it -- if not enough people make the private decision to purchase "good" food, "private sector engagement" it is a ridiculus waste of taxpayers' money that could be better used elsewhere. (What, is the government going to start mandating people buy apples now before they can fuel up their cars?!)
And please, don't get me started on the "Physical Activity" section. Sheesh...

Many of the ideas on that site bother me! Bottom line, though, is that, unlike you, I'm not surprised. I'm not surprised at all. In my experience at least, it seems level of education is rarely indicative of nutritional wisdom, understanding of exercise, or grasp of the proper place for public policy in agriculture and economics.
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#3 of 11 Old 03-28-2010, 11:33 AM
 
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Scary, sad...but I agree with the PP...unfortunately not surprising. It's a program through the USDA, who developed the "revised" food pyramid with the help of food interest groups. The food pyramid is giant political mess.

What really bothers me is that the federal government finds it necessary to comment and guide Americans in how they should eat and they don't bother actually doing legitimate, long range studies to guide their recommendations. I'm not anti-government by any means, but I find it exceptionally frustrating when the gov't develops guidelines based on false information. It's exactly the diet they are recommending that makes us obese.

It really goes to show that you have to think and research for yourself EVERYTHING. I lose respect and trust for the "experts" every day.

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#4 of 11 Old 03-28-2010, 01:50 PM - Thread Starter
 
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It really goes to show that you have to think and research for yourself EVERYTHING. I lose respect and trust for the "experts" every day.
But that's just such a bummer, isn't? I mean, I love to do this sort of research, so it's not a problem for me. But so many people don't have the time for it, or the interest, or the ability to distinguish good information from bad.

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#5 of 11 Old 03-28-2010, 04:55 PM
 
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And if it makes economic sense for convenience stations to sell healthier foods or for communities to hold farmers' markets, they do it -- if not enough people make the private decision to purchase "good" food, "private sector engagement" it is a ridiculus waste of taxpayers' money that could be better used elsewhere. (What, is the government going to start mandating people buy apples now before they can fuel up their cars?!)


or grasp of the proper place for public policy in agriculture and economics.
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#6 of 11 Old 03-28-2010, 05:00 PM
 
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Tub margarine????

I really couldn't believe that one when I read it!
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#7 of 11 Old 03-28-2010, 05:11 PM
 
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I think it's sad that they emphasize eating fake foods over read foods. For example, evaporated milk instead of cream, margarine instead of real butter? Really?

Here, eat plastic instead of real food. It's much better for you.

Wife to Bri, mom to G (8), R (6), I (5). Expecting #4 - 8.16.11
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#8 of 11 Old 03-28-2010, 05:19 PM
 
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I don't think the mothering demo is who is being reached with this program. I would guess that the demo here skews middle/upper income, some/graduate college.

There are many urban communities who do not have grocery stores that are easily accessible by public transportation. I live in Pittsburgh and there is a huge neighborhood called the Hill District that hasn't had a grocery store in a decade or more because of theft. The city is willing to pay a grocer to move in and chain after chain is pulling out. So the people who live there (low income, dependant on public transport) have to walk or take several buses to get to a grocery store. As a result they depend on the convenience stores and fast food places for their meals. After a decade, we're talking one or more generations of kids who's palates have been shaped and aren't being taught how to cook or choose the proper foods for nutrition. And they will not be able to pass it on to their children, etc, etc ,etc...

I don't want to get into the politics of it, but just because "we" don't see this as a problem in our lives, doesn't mean that it doesn't exist. I don't agree with the specific nutrition recommendations, however I think it is simply fantastic to be raising awareness of the importance of eating fresh produce and proteins and MOVING. I think just getting people to do that will solve 80% of the issue.

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#9 of 11 Old 03-29-2010, 06:14 PM
 
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There are many urban communities who do not have grocery stores that are easily accessible by public transportation. I live in Pittsburgh and there is a huge neighborhood called the Hill District that hasn't had a grocery store in a decade or more because of theft. The city is willing to pay a grocer to move in and chain after chain is pulling out. So the people who live there (low income, dependant on public transport) have to walk or take several buses to get to a grocery store. As a result they depend on the convenience stores and fast food places for their meals. After a decade, we're talking one or more generations of kids who's palates have been shaped and aren't being taught how to cook or choose the proper foods for nutrition. And they will not be able to pass it on to their children, etc, etc ,etc...

I don't want to get into the politics of it, but just because "we" don't see this as a problem in our lives, doesn't mean that it doesn't exist. I don't agree with the specific nutrition recommendations, however I think it is simply fantastic to be raising awareness of the importance of eating fresh produce and proteins and MOVING. I think just getting people to do that will solve 80% of the issue.
I agree with this completely. Go to any urban area and you'll find neighborhoods that lack a full service grocery store. Oakland, CA had one area that lacked a regular grocery store for almost 10 years. Nearest one (w/in a mile or a bit more) was a Whole Foods. Not the store most people can afford. Several non urban towns in central CA all have this problem. And not everyone has a car, or even the money or time to take public transportation (if it exists) to go grocery shopping. Imagine a parent w/1+ kid(s) having to take a bus or more than one bus, to get to the store, shop, carry the bags and hold the hand of any child, to then turn around and take the bus(es) back home. Daunting.
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#10 of 11 Old 03-30-2010, 08:51 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Yes, some very good points. I wasn't intending to criticize the program as a whole. I think there are some very good initiatives here, and some very important issues being brought more into the light.

I wasn't surprised at her food specific recommendations, but I so wanted it to be a little more whole-foods based.
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#11 of 11 Old 05-20-2011, 06:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Black Orchid View Post
There are many urban communities who do not have grocery stores that are easily accessible by public transportation. I live in Pittsburgh and there is a huge neighborhood called the Hill District that hasn't had a grocery store in a decade or more because of theft. The city is willing to pay a grocer to move in and chain after chain is pulling out. So the people who live there (low income, dependant on public transport) have to walk or take several buses to get to a grocery store. As a result they depend on the convenience stores and fast food places for their meals. After a decade, we're talking one or more generations of kids who's palates have been shaped and aren't being taught how to cook or choose the proper foods for nutrition. And they will not be able to pass it on to their children, etc, etc ,etc...

I don't want to get into the politics of it, but just because "we" don't see this as a problem in our lives, doesn't mean that it doesn't exist. I don't agree with the specific nutrition recommendations, however I think it is simply fantastic to be raising awareness of the importance of eating fresh produce and proteins and MOVING. I think just getting people to do that will solve 80% of the issue.
I agree with this completely. Go to any urban area and you'll find neighborhoods that lack a full service grocery store. Oakland, CA had one area that lacked a regular grocery store for almost 10 years. Nearest one (w/in a mile or a bit more) was a Whole Foods. Not the store most people can afford. Several non urban towns in central CA all have this problem. And not everyone has a car, or even the money or time to take public transportation (if it exists) to go grocery shopping. Imagine a parent w/1+ kid(s) having to take a bus or more than one bus, to get to the store, shop, carry the bags and hold the hand of any child, to then turn around and take the bus(es) back home. Daunting.


So no "full service grocery store" finds it economically viable to operate in that area?  Seems like a problem. So why is it the government's responsibility to solve that problem? 

Are you saying a grocery store there is not supposed to be economically viable...just helpful? Well, sell that 'helpful' idea to the moms in other countries that strap on their youngest 2, discipline their oldest to hold hands and mind the middles, and head to the fields to gather their dinner the best they can for that day. Yikes...since when does a grocery store have to be "easily accessable" or else it's a human rights violation?!  And seriously...no "time to go grocery shopping?!"  A designer dress and a beach party at the Hampton's would be "daunting" for me...that doesn't mean I expect the government to make it happen. Let's get some perspective folks. Life can be hard for people with fewer resources. Help those you can. But don't force me to help Jane Oakland have an easier time of grocery shopping if I think my resources are better spent helping Jane Uganda get water.  

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