10 years vegetarian, convince me to eat meat. or not. - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 12:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm sad to say this, but I feel like maybe I shouldn't be vegetarian anymore. I'm type O, I'm not sure I buy the bloodtype diet, but it makes a little sense. For a while now I feel like my body has been telling me it needs meat, or just more protein in general. And my brain is telling me that there is no way I can eat chicken and burgers. I have osteoarthritis, my joints are starting to hurt bad, don't know if it's the pregnancy or what, and my brain has just been so foggy for so long. I don't know what to do.
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#2 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 12:44 PM
 
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Well, of course you should listen to your body, but if all it's telling you is that you need more protein, there are lots of ways to do that without eating meat.

Have you talked to your doctor?
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#3 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 12:53 PM
 
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Well, I'm a carnivore and I really believe we NEED meat. If you don't want to try chicken or burgers, what about lamb, pork, goat, or domestic rabbit? Fish? What about bone broths?

FWIW, I have a friend who was raised vegetarian (vegan, actually, I believe) and has come a LONG way in the last couple of years. She just felt that the way she was eating was not ok for their needs and she met me, and well, we raise our own meats, lol. Never did she think she'd be cooking a piece of goat or rabbit.

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#4 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 01:25 PM
 
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I think the blood type diet is kinda hooey, personally. I'm a type A and supposed to be veg, I think, but I don't do well on a veg diet. I really do best eating some animal protein.

Pregnancy definitely increases the need for protein. If you are morally opposed to eating meat, try upping your vegetarian protein as much as you can. If you are OK with ethically raised meat, seek that out and see how you do. Go slowly - I will never forget the digestive SLOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOWNESS when I started eating meat after not touching it for about 7-8 years!
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#5 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 01:31 PM
 
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I firm believer that we need to high quality meat (and other animal products) to be truly healthy. Grassfed beef, pastured chicken, raw milk and cheese, butter, pastured eggs, etc. I'm sorry your health hasn't been well. You might be interested in reading The Vegetarian Myth by Lierre Keith. She spent 20 years as a vegan and it ruined her health. I haven't read it myself but I've heard from former veg*ns that it was really helpful when they starting questioning their current diet (from what I understandthe last chapter is about how you shouldn't have any kids blah blah blah but the rest is supposed to be good).
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#6 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 01:33 PM
 
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I completely agree with Cherrybomb.
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#7 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 06:58 PM
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I'm convinced it's impossible to be well nourished as a vegan and nearly so as a vegetarian.
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#8 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 07:09 PM
 
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You know, everyone's body is different. I don't buy into fad diets and all that. I also don't buy into the whole thing that one needs meat. You don't. I am healthy and thriving on a vegetarian diet and so is my daughter. Just as adamant meat eaters can show you study upon study that supports the theory of eating meat is best, vegetarians can show you studies that being vegetarian lower cancer rates and extend your life.

If you are morally opposed to eating meat, then up your vegetable protein and eat better. But if you aren't opposed to eating meat, then eat meat. Just ease into it and you should be fine.

There are many cultures that eat vegetarians and they are healthy and vibrant. So, it's all relative. Good luck!

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#9 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 07:13 PM
 
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I'm vegan so I'm not going to convince you to eat meat but I would encourage you to think carefully about making a life-changing decision during a 'temporary' phase (pregnancy). There are lots of ways to get protein without eating meat, and you could try upping your veg. protein first and see if that helps. Or maybe you'd feel better eating meat at least through your pregnancy & re-evaluate after -- so this could be a short-term change in diet (though you may choose to continue it after birth). Not really trying to sway you either way, just some ways of thinking about it. I don't believe we need meat & there are many long-term veg*ns on the Veg. forum but I can totally understand questioning your diet, I have too at times... FWIW, I'm also Type O... I don't know a ton about the blood-types diet except that it's generally regarded as unscientific 'hooey' based on the little I have read.

Oh also consider the possibility of food allergies/intolerances that could be causing your symptoms (could be something you tend to eat more of as a vegetarian -- i.e. soy products or something)...

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#10 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 07:35 PM
 
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It is my belief that humans have evolved as omnivores and that as such, our bodies are designed to process the nutrients from both animals and plants. Meat is a good source of protein and iron and I believe that our bodies process those nutrients best from those sources. I do believe that we are certainly capable of processing nutrients from all plant sources, but that getting them from all plants might not be the best way.

I am also a firm believer in listening to what your body is telling you. I believe that cravings are our body's way of telling us we need something specific-craving fruit might be the body's way of saying it needs water or sugar, craving cheeseburgers might mean you need more icing, etc.

If you truely feel that your body is telling you that you need meat, I don't think it's bad to give it a shot. Start very small, with stuff that least resembles where it came from, in small servings.
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#11 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 07:37 PM
 
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Well, I was a vegetarian for ten years. I was tired all the time, and I was depressed and anxious. I had tried to wean my depression/anxiety meds off for 5 years or so, but never could quite get off that last small dose.

I thought it was normal to come home from work, eat dinner, and then just watch tv until bed because I was just so worn out the thought of doing ANYTHING seemed so exhausting. I mean, I did just work a full day, I thought it was fine and normal that I was so tired.

It never even occurred to me these issues were in any way related to my diet. I read about healthy diets and tried not to eat crap. I thought I was doing the best thing I could!

Anyway, for various reasons, that I think were partly related to my depression, I started eating some meat. I had had a series of nasty food related social situations occur, and I think because I was depressive I just stopped caring about being veggie, which was sad in itself. I mean when you do something like that for a decade, it becomes a part of you.

After I started eating meat again, I just had so much energy!!! I just had felt so much better. I did not start eating it for health reasons but I do now feel so much better. It has been about 7 years since I returned to meat eating. Oh, and I got of my meds too and have never once felt like I needed them again. I feel so sane and not depressed!!

So, I am supportive of the vegetarian diet. I still have veggie friends and will cook veggie or vegan for them and support their choice, but for ME, I think I need to eat meet to do well. Not every day, but as a regular part of my diet.
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#12 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 07:39 PM
 
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What is your diet like right now? Are you eating healthy, hearty whole foods are you eating a lot of processed or "junk" foods? Have you tried adding tons of plant sourced proteins into your diet and seeing how you feel?

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#13 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 07:47 PM
 
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I was vegetarian for about 12 years, but my body started letting me know that what I was doing wasn't working, at least while I was breastfeeding, and that if I wanted to continue breastfeeding I was going to have to make drastic changes. The first meat I ate was a can of skinless, boneless salmon and I swear I could feel my body sucking the Omega-3 fatty acids out of it.

I have no advice about what you should do, but I can assure you that you're not the only longterm vegetarian to be in that situation.
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#14 of 35 Old 07-31-2010, 10:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by TulsiLeaf View Post
There are many cultures that eat vegetarians and they are healthy and vibrant. So, it's all relative. Good luck!
Lol, I found beef or chicken to be be more appetizing than vegetarians........sorry TulsiLeaf, I couldn't resist.

I tried the vegetarian diet once for a few months but I was sooo tired that I couldn't even walk at a normal pace. My body really does need meat to function right. I have met some people that seem to do fine vegetarian though but it really does depend on your body. If you are having health problems that you think are diet related, then it's probably a good idea to change some things in it. If you are craving meat then give it a try for a while to see if it helps.
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#15 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 10:00 AM
 
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That reminds me, I read some articles recently that there is sometimes an 'adaptation period' to becoming vegetarian... Your body needs time to get used to it, because it uses the iron differently... so that is why you often hear people say they tried being vegetarian for a few months but were too tired to continue. The body can adapt really well to utilizing non-heme iron sources; vegetarians have lower iron stores than meat-eaters (one of the reasons veg*n diets decrease the risk of many illnesses; excess iron stores can be toxic), but there is no higher incidence of iron-deficiency anemia. My own DS, for ex, has very low iron stores but his RBC is perfect & he has no signs of anemia (he's been vegan since birth). Supposedly if you stick it out 6+ months you're more likely to adapt to it & feel healthy eating veg*n... But there's a transition period where some people feel tired & run-down & may show signs of IDA. So I'm wondering if there is a similar adaptation period during major changes in your body (i.e. pregnancy, major stress, major illness, etc.)? I wonder if anyone's ever studied that.... perhaps for some people, as your iron needs increase, they go through that same adjustment? I don't know, just venturing a guess..

Anyway, I also wanted to mention B12, I don't think you said you were vegan so it's probably not an issue for you, but are you eating good sources of B12? That could cause similar symptoms.

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#16 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 12:59 PM
 
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I am familiar with the blood type diet but I think it's quack science, honestly. My H and I are type O and type A respectively and we are both healthy vegetarians. I made it through my whole pregnancy with no meat and was very healthy, good energy levels too.

You will need more protein in late pregnancy and during breastfeeding but that does not necessarily mean you need to eat meat. During pregnancy I ate Greek yogurt, plenty of raw almonds, tempeh, soy milk, eggs, peanut butter, lots and lots of beans of course, and nutritional yeast now and then for the B vitamins. It is not hard for the average person to get enough protein - pregnant women have to try just a little harder whether they are veg or not. But my husband is a 6' 2" man with a hearty appetite and he has no trouble eating enough protein.

Your fatigue may actually relate more to iron levels, which are depleted by pregnancy - have you had that checked lately?

My feeling is that the generically "best" diet is mostly plants, and may include a little bit of meat but doesn't have to. We choose not to eat meat, but if you do, I think it's best to keep it to a kind of occasional side dish.
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#17 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 01:08 PM
 
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I was a vegetarian for a long time and vegan for a while. Although I was eating whole foods and avoiding processed junk, I still found myself feeling very unwell.

If you're eating grains and beans, then the anti-nutrients in them could be disrupting your absorption of minerals. I think this happened to me because when I was pregnant with #4 (before I even realized I was pregnant) I craved and even dreamed about eating shellfish and red meat and liver. My body was screaming for zinc especially and also B12 and omega 3, and other nutrients that are most easily obtained from animal sources. It's possible that some people simply cannot utilize plant sourced nutrients as well as those from animals. Many people can't make vitamin A out of beta carotene, for example.

Another thing is that it is very easy to get too much omega 6 on a vegetarian diet, especially if you eat a lot of nuts. Too much omega 6 causes inflammation which can lead to a whole host of problems.

Meat does not provide just protein. There are many other nutritional components to take into consideration. I can say from personal experience that adding nutrient dense foods like clams, oysters, and beef liver has done wonders for me - but I also stopped eating other foods like wheat and most grains, and cut down considerably on beans, and also nuts and other sources of omega 6.
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#18 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 01:36 PM
 
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I think I did horrible things to my body as a vegetarian, leading to my hypothyroidism. Just a suspicion, but I do think we need to listen to our bodies.

I'm in the middle of "Good Calories, Bad Calories" by Gary Taubes, have read "Nourishing Traditions" and "Real Food for Mother and Baby," and while I disagree with some of the stuff that Sally Fallon perpetuates, I do think she's got a lot of valid points. I don't think that vegetarian diets are truly healthy for most people. (And, "Good Calories, Bad Calories" is really supporting this idea for me, without actually coming out and indicting veg diets--at least not yet in the book.)

I also just got a Kindle and downloaded a sample of "The Vegetarian Myth" that Katie mentioned and started reading it. Really interesting stuff so far.

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#19 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 01:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by rachelsmama View Post
I was vegetarian for about 12 years, but my body started letting me know that what I was doing wasn't working, at least while I was breastfeeding, and that if I wanted to continue breastfeeding I was going to have to make drastic changes. The first meat I ate was a can of skinless, boneless salmon and I swear I could feel my body sucking the Omega-3 fatty acids out of it.

I have no advice about what you should do, but I can assure you that you're not the only longterm vegetarian to be in that situation.


I was a vegetarian for 15 years and I also went back to an omnivore diet during pregnancy. It is difficult when the body and the mind are at odds but, for me, it got to the point that my mind wasn't functioning well since the body's needs weren't being met. No diet fits everyone perfectly and our own needs change over time as well.
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#20 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 02:22 PM
 
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Oh, I also read The Vegetarian Myth, and it was definitely worth the read although I didn't agree with everything she wrote (she kind of rants against having children and certain religions). She made some excellent points about how agriculture (specifically grain and soy monocrops) are devastating the environment and how animals are essential to sustainable farming. In other words, there's no way to grow foods that are 100% vegan and sustainable. Animals are always part of the equation, whether they're eaten directly or not.

As for the blood type diet, here's a critique that I found helpful.
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#21 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 02:50 PM
 
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I think it is possible to be perfectly healthy eating a vegetarian or vegan diet.

That said I also think it is ok to eat meat and that you can be really healthy doing that.

I think the blood type diet is crap. I am O+ and never felt healthier than when I was vegan.

I started eating meat again because I wanted it. For various reasons. And now I am going back to a vegan diet (I never went back to milk and only eat eggs occasionally for breakfast where I work because they are SOOOO good but I always eat them with hash-browns and I gained a lot of weight doing that but it was worth every pound. However, now it is time to stop for so many reasons...).

I am a mostly vegetarian who sells meat in a butcher shop. I am not anti- meat although I am anti most of what I sell. Most of it is crap.

There is so much that goes into what we eat and why and how that all culminates in health or poor health. If for now your body is telling you to eat meat then maybe you should find some good healthy meat (try to get as far away as possible from factory farms and genetic Frankenstein animals. I would avoid poultry all together, even happy free range birds are usually genetic mutants. also skinless boneless lean meat does not automatically equal healthy or high quality or tasty). You do not need to eat a pound of meat at every meal either. Start with a small modest portion of meat. A healthy portion of meat is 4 ounces. or about half a chicken breast or a steak the size of a deck of cards. I small sandwich. Maybe try a little portion about 2 to 3 times a week. if that helps stop there. or if you still feel like you need more have a little more. You will still be eating in a responsible manner while getting your needs met. If you can find some good eggs, definitely add those in. (I recommend getting eggs from a farm that you go to and see how the chickens are treated. If you live anywhere close to rural you should be able to find these easily and still fairly inexpensively. I think I could get good eggs for about $3 a dozen or less which when you consider a dozen eggs could feed me for six meals thats not to shabby. And nothing has to die

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#22 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 02:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks so much for all your words. I've been weighing over this issue yesterday since I had the whole day to myself. I saw my doctor and she ordered me a complete blood panel so I just need to go get blood drawn sometime next week. Now I'm wondering now if maybe there's a test they can do that would test to see if I'm allergic or unable to absorb certain foods too? I eat a fair amount of whole grains and beans, so yes perhaps the anti-nutrients in them could be disrupting my absorption of minerals.

Overall I feel like I eat decent, avoid junk and processed foods but not entirely - eating an amys burrito is just easy when you feel like crap and not up to cooking. The way I am feeling is definitely diet related. It's not varied enough and I'm probably not eating enough too. I were to start eating meat I don't know that it would solve my problems compeletly.

I never learned to cook, I have a stack of cooking books checked out from the library ranging from nourishing traditions to how to cook everything, but I am just overwelmed to really begin trying making things. If something doesn't t urn out as expected I get discouraged and just move on to another recipe, which is I have literally no dinner repoire built up. Thankfully my fiance enjoys cooking and has no issue cooking whatever, but he works until 6 and it's not cool for him to come home and make dinner 2-3 times a week. I want to learn to cook better, and create more nutrient dense meals that don't require a bunch of time. Maybe I should try and master that, and watch how I feel and then maybe slowly incorporate meat if things don't improve.
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#23 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 04:36 PM
 
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I would avoid poultry all together, even happy free range birds are usually genetic mutants.
I'm going to have to disagree with this. While there are valid arguments against cornish cross (namely that their fast growth and largeness causes serious health issues for them) they aren't "genetic mutants." They're crossbreeds.
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#24 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 04:47 PM
 
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Whoami, I really don't think nutrient dense foods have to be ultra time consuming. For tradtional foods (which are nutrient dense by nature) the prep times tend to be short.

For example, a couple of days ago I roasted one of our chickens. It only took a few minutes to prep- washed it off, rubbed in some evoo, salted and peppered it inside and out, and then roasted it for 3 hours at 275 and 30 minutes at 375. While it was resting, I took the drippings and made gravy (tbsp of cornstarch plus some milk, salt and pepper). While the gravy was simmering, I peeled and sliced potatoes and fried them with onions in butter and bacon grease. I also picked some green beans out of the garden and boiled them and tossed them with salt and butter. Although the cooking time itself was long, prep time alone was maybe 45 minutes.

After we ate I picked the carcass clean and sat aside the leftover meat to use for dinner today (Indian butter chicken). I took the carcass and all the left over bones and put them in the crockpot with water and some apple cider vinegar and cooked it on low all night. In the morning I added bay leaves, carrots, onions, and celery and let it cook all day. Strained it that evening and now it's in the freezer ready for another meal in the future. Again, the cook time might have been long (24 hours) but prep time was maybe 10 minutes. And bone broth is one of the most nutrious things you can eat!

Cooking does take practice. I never learned how to cook and had to teach myself, and I had a lot of frustration and missteps in the beginning. I just had to keep going. Once you start getting the hang of it, it goes much more quickly and smoothly. You learn things, like when making gravy, cornstarch needs to be added slowly and whisked briskly to keep it from clumping. I'd say start with simple recipes and be gentle on yourself. Find a couple simple "back up" dinners in case you blow it. Creamed tuna is usually my go to if something doesn't turn out, for example!
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#25 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 05:38 PM
 
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Thanks so much for all your words. I've been weighing over this issue yesterday since I had the whole day to myself. I saw my doctor and she ordered me a complete blood panel so I just need to go get blood drawn sometime next week. Now I'm wondering now if maybe there's a test they can do that would test to see if I'm allergic or unable to absorb certain foods too?
THe blood test sounds like a great idea. Based on your OP, and especially based on your update, I would suggest taking a close look at several things about your diet, to see if there is something you are deficient in. eg. Are you getting enough iron? Enough B12? Enough vitamin D? Enough protein? Enough EFAs? Drinking enough water? etc. I'd get your thyroid checked too.

If you really intuitively feel like you need to eat meat, and you want to do it, then go for it! But, if you aren't comfortable with it, or prefer to try other things first, then I think it would be worth doing some experimenting to see if you can pinpoint a cause.

I totally believe that there are people who do feel better eating meat. But I also disagree with the PPs who have replied that meat is necessary or that it is very difficult to feel good on a vegetarian diet. I think that it gets very complex and different things are going to affect different people. I personally feel great as a vegetarian, and have not had meat in over 17 years. No health problems whatsoever. I have been either pregnant, nursing, or both for over 7 years straight. My energy levels are great (and I have an extremely demanding schedule). My hemoglobin, when I've had it checked, has always been nicely in the middle of the "normal" range. Again, I am not saying that being vegetarian is right for everyone, just that it IS possible. (And that is not necessarily even directed at you, OP, just putting it out there!)

As for tests for intolerances and allergies - you can test for allergies, and there are other conditions you can test for of course - but a lot of it is best determined simply by experimenting. For example, my husband has *wanted* to be vegetarian for years, but just couldn't do it. He had too many meat cravings, so he continued to eat meat on a semi-regular basis. We have recently gone gluten-free (and dairy-free) and his meat cravings have completely gone away (and he is feeling great without meat). Don't ask me to explain the science behind that one!

Anyway, good luck to you with whatever you decide. I would start with the blood work to see if there are any obvious deficiencies. I would also do some reading to see if there is anything that you need to increase in your diet and/or supplement with. As for learning to cook, like the PP said, start simple and work your way up... it does take some time in the beginning but you will be able to build up a basic repertoire of simple meals, and then you can branch out more when you are ready. I'm sure there are lots of videos on YouTube that might be helpful, or look for books and videos from your library. Maybe on the weekends your fiance could give you some cooking lessons?
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#26 of 35 Old 08-01-2010, 10:05 PM
 
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I think as far as allergies/intolerances, I agree with the pp that you'll be better off doing some experimenting rather than getting a test -- you might not show 'allergic' on a test but still be intolerant... Hopefully the blood panel can shed some light on the situation too -- you could be anemic or something, and you don't have to eat meat to correct that (though you can if you want to) -- I agree that if you *want* to remain vegetarian you might want to look for other causes for your symptoms besides lack of meat because it sounds like there are likely other factors...

As far as cooking issues, you could try cooking with your DH on the weekend (it's often more fun together & DH could teach you a bit & you can try new recipes together) -- then you'll have meals in the fridge or freezer for when you don't have time or energy to cook throughout the week. I'm all for quick, easy, but nutrient-dense meals/snacks & there are always a lot of ideas on the Veg forum.

Co-sleeping is really wonderful when your child actually SLEEPS!! familybed1.gif
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#27 of 35 Old 08-02-2010, 06:38 PM
 
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I am also O blood type. I went vegetarian when I was 20 and ate no meat or fish, rarely eggs and a lot of dairy. Later when soy really hit the market I ate tofu and other soy products, plus beans. I ate a very high carb diet filled with pasta, rice, ceral and flour based foods.

When I was 35 and pregnant I felt things were not good with my diet. I started to “feel” I needed to eat more protein and less carbs. I started to crave more eggs and fish. So I ate them and yes my body was happy. After pregnancy I studied up more on carb based diets, eating soy foods and eating animal proteins. I knew I needed to cut back on empty carbs like pasta, cereals and flours – and my need for sugar. I knew I could not do this while still vegetarian. It would be too hard for ME.

So I started eating meat and it went fine. I like it again, probably more than I ever did. I don’t feel like such a shaky low blood sugar mess anymore either. I eat was less pasta and cereal now too. I am now 42, and working on eating much less carbs/grains and replacing with more vegetables! I am also eating way more and way better fats. Yes more fats! I eat full fat yogurt, sour cream and milk now. It tastes much better than low fat, and I have not gained weight eating this way. I stopped using vegetable, canola and soy oils. Now I use olive oil, coconut oil and butter. You might look at the fat quanity and quality too, along with your protein. I learned a lot about what we should be eating for health, from Traditional Diet resources.

I am not sure about the Blood type diets either, but the diet for O type is the oldest diet. It's based on the Paleo diet which is gaining popularity because it's based on foods that are easily digested in most people.

Rhianna
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#28 of 35 Old 08-03-2010, 03:05 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Are you getting enough iron? Enough B12? Enough vitamin D? Enough protein? Enough EFAs? Drinking enough water? etc. I'd get your thyroid checked too.

If you really intuitively feel like you need to eat meat, and you want to do it, then go for it! But, if you aren't comfortable with it, or prefer to try other things first, then I think it would be worth doing some experimenting to see if you can pinpoint a cause.

I totally believe that there are people who do feel better eating meat. But I also disagree with the PPs who have replied that meat is necessary or that it is very difficult to feel good on a vegetarian diet. I think that it gets very complex and different things are going to affect different people. I personally feel great as a vegetarian, and have not had meat in over 17 years.

Anyway, good luck to you with whatever you decide. I would start with the blood work to see if there are any obvious deficiencies. I would also do some reading to see if there is anything that you need to increase in your diet and/or supplement with. As for learning to cook, like the PP said, start simple and work your way up... it does take some time in the beginning but you will be able to build up a basic repertoire of simple meals, and then you can branch out more when you are ready. I'm sure there are lots of videos on YouTube that might be helpful, or look for books and videos from your library. Maybe on the weekends your fiance could give you some cooking lessons?
Oddly, I think the only thing I'm getting enough of is protein. Today I had about 74 grams of protein, and only 11 mg of iron. I'm taking prenatals but ideally I want to meet my needs by eating food. Got blood drawn today, and forgot to add that I am having my thyroid checked too. I'm really committed to being healthy so I'm going to start reading and try to figure out what it is my body needs.

I don't want to eat meat, I never really enjoyed it, and since i've been vegetarian for the better part of my life I can't imagine starting. But again, I'm willing to try it for the sake of my physical and mental health. will benefit from it. I've got alot of experimenting with food before I think I can go through with it though!

I'm going to go easy on myself and be patient with learning to cook. It's just one of those things that I know takes time to master, but yet I still want instant results. My boy loves being in the kitchen so maybe this will be a good experience for us all. A friend recommended I started recording good eats so it's set for tivo now, and I checked out a Julia Childs dvd along with Jacques Pepin: More Fast Food My Way. I think seeing the process of watching and cooking will help me get over my fears of being a failure cook and make it a little more fun than strictly reading recipes. And on the weekends my honey has agreed to work with me in the kitchen and teach me what he's learned.

I'll post again when I get my results but please if anyone else has anything else to chime in with please do!
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#29 of 35 Old 08-06-2010, 12:45 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Well my bloodwork came back in normal range, and thyroid is fine. I guess I just need to continue eating better and hopefully things turn around.

On a random note, is meat the only source where you can get all the essential amino acids? I was taking tyrosine before this pregnancy and I was feeling more energized.
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#30 of 35 Old 08-06-2010, 01:35 PM
 
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Well my bloodwork came back in normal range, and thyroid is fine. I guess I just need to continue eating better and hopefully things turn around.

On a random note, is meat the only source where you can get all the essential amino acids? I was taking tyrosine before this pregnancy and I was feeling more energized.
Yay! I'm so glad your blood work came back healthy. Though I'm not surprised - a vegetarian diet wouldn't cause any deficiencies in a healthy person! If I were you I would just focus on getting sufficient calories, plenty of protein, and lots of good fats in the form of avocados, nuts/nut butters, and coconut or olive oil. This is especially important since you're pregnant (congrats by the way!)

You will get all the essential amino acids just by eating a varied diet of sufficient caloric count. You don't need to worry about 'complete proteins' or 'protein combining' - these are both antiquated ideas.

But if you want to cover your bases (and I totally understand that!), here's a list of plant-based foods that contain all the essential amino acids :
quinoa
buckwheat
oatmeal
hemp seeds
chia seeds
spirulina
chlorella

cruelty-free, beastie-full!
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