Would you feed your baby non-organic, but "sustainable" produce? - Mothering Forums

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Old 05-02-2011, 10:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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We just bought a family membership to a local farm that has a bunch of kid-friendly activities, but also allows you to pick your own vegetables and fruits.  My DD is seven months old, and we've been slowly introducing some vegetables and fruits, but I have been very careful to only serve her organic produce (and produce from our own organic backyard garden).  

 

The farm that we have a membership to states that their farming practices related to pesticide use are this: 

 

"Our goal is to maintain environmental balance and promote conditions favoring beneficial insects. We use an insecticide when "bad" insects extend beyond the natural balance, and then only when necessary to save the crop. When we do use synthetic sprays, we have intentionally limited ourselves to those which have not been implicated as potential carcinogens...

 

...That is the way we view the chemicals that are available for the control of pests and disease; use them sparingly and only when necessary to save the crop. It is more satisfying merely to observe the inter-activity of growing crops rather than intervene. Compost, cover crops, and rotation build soil health and microbial life. Fertilizers are used to supplement plant nutrition that may not be totally met by the natural reserves in the soil. "

 

 

So, my question is, would you give you child produce from this farm given their practices related to pesticides?  

 

Thanks!


Kelly: Mama to a spunky, joy-filled DD kid.gif(10/04/10), and a loving wife to a music-making DH broc1.gif (07/14/07) We fly-by-nursing1.gifand familybed1.gif, and are just starting to TTC#2 dust.gifhh2.gif

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Old 05-02-2011, 11:37 AM
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Hmm, I like that they upfront to begin with! That is awesome..

The only problem with their policy is that you don't know where they draw the line as to when they decide they need to use chemicals..yk? For example, they might feel overwhelmed and just take the easier route of spraying than doing something more labor intensive...Then again if they are willing to be upfront right away maybe they aren't like that..

 

If it was me and I had the option to go a strictly organic/sustainable farm over the farm you described I would...I would pick the organic one. However if this is your choice between local or grocery store then I would absolutely keep going to that local farm and giving them my business happily!

 

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Old 05-02-2011, 11:47 AM
 
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That is the way we view the chemicals that are available for the control of pests and disease; use them sparingly and only when necessary to save the crop.

 

 

so next year a different crop is planted over top of chemical field

 

and throw in run-off

 

many(in my area) of our local farms sell directly to local chain grocers

 

 

answer-NO way


 

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Old 05-02-2011, 01:00 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for your responses!  I am with you -- I think we'll use our membership for the kid-friendly activities, but not the pick-your-own produce.  I like the idea of buying local produce, and we're very lucky to have a lot of farmers markets in the area. 

 

In some ways the passivity of their statement about their practices makes it even worse since the consumer doesn't know how much pesticides were used, and when, yet their statement makes it seem as though their practices are more ethical than other non-organic farms.  

 

When we're at the local farm markets and we ask the sellers if their produce is organic, many respond by saying "We're not organic, but we're pesticide free..."  Is the difference between organic and pesticide free the certification?  Is it also important to be weary of the farmers who claim to be pesticide free, but aren't certified organic?

 


Kelly: Mama to a spunky, joy-filled DD kid.gif(10/04/10), and a loving wife to a music-making DH broc1.gif (07/14/07) We fly-by-nursing1.gifand familybed1.gif, and are just starting to TTC#2 dust.gifhh2.gif

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Old 05-02-2011, 01:16 PM
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Being certified "organic" is really tough for small farmers. It costs a lot and you have to jump through a lot of hoops to get the USDA sticker...

 

Most of our farmers at our local markets ARE organic but NOT UDSA certified so they tend not to say it right on their signs. If you ask though they will gladly talk to you about it, I find it is a big pet peeve of a lot of farmers.

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Old 05-02-2011, 10:32 PM
 
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They get points for being honest. But no, that isn't good enough for my kids. Maybe for an adult but not for a child. Organic standards are Notthat difficult do and no, I don't trust anyone with my kids food without oversight. Pesticides are bad for the Earth, they are bad for the farm workers, they are bad for the waterways, and they are even bad for the compost heap (thank you Mother Earth News). Yes, organic standards require some money and paperwork and hard work but yes, I value the results.


 

 

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Old 05-05-2011, 10:52 AM
 
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This is so true. I worked on an organic farm for a summer and it was completely organic. However it was difficult for the owner to advertise as such because she wasn't USDA certified. It would have cost too much for her small farm. Same was true for several other farm operations I had experience with.

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Originally Posted by Ldavis24 View Post

Being certified "organic" is really tough for small farmers. It costs a lot and you have to jump through a lot of hoops to get the USDA sticker...

 

Most of our farmers at our local markets ARE organic but NOT UDSA certified so they tend not to say it right on their signs. If you ask though they will gladly talk to you about it, I find it is a big pet peeve of a lot of farmers.



 

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