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Old 09-04-2013, 05:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Our youngest daughter is a lovely, intelligent interesting child. She's smart (scary smart) funny and interesting. That being said, she has some neurological issues: She has Tourette Syndrome (mainly some head jerking, coughing, sniffing etc) a mild form of Aspergers and Sensory Processing Disorder. The SPD causes her to reject many many foods, favoring mild flavored starchy foods.

 

Many foods cause her to gag, spit out foods, be unable to swallow. Our older children all were offered a variety of foods and usually chose fruits, vegetables, healthy grains etc. Our youngest was breastfed for 4.5 years. She started solids (either self feeding or home made mashed foods made in a food grinder) at about 7 months and loved everything, as long as it was soft and someone else was feeding it to her.

 

When she got a little older and started to choose her own foods, around a year or so, "Don't LIKE it!" Gagging, "chipmunking" (carrying chewed food in her cheeks for hours and not swallowing it) stuffing her mouth full  (she no longer does chipmunking or spitting) and yelling "I can't swallow!" and then spitting out mouthfuls of food began. Our Pediatrician diagnosed her with Sensory Integration Disorder and we tried to get her into a therapy feeding program. It took YEARS (we are not low income, but couldn't afford the programs that didn't take our insurance) for us to get her accepted at Easter Seals.... and it was ridiculous.  She finally got "evaluated" at 5 and got into a program at 6 and a half. The things the "therapist" did were suited to a much younger child, and tried "tricks" to get her to eat, which our dd saw through immediately and refused to be tricked.

 

I asked for a different therapist, as S (our dd) told me, "Miss T doesn't like me, and she sure doesn't like you at all!" (At the age of 6.) The woman rushed through her sessions, rarely made eye contact with me, so she could go to her own child in the Easter Seals day care center and be with her baby. I understand her desire to be with her baby, but it was evident she needed to make a choice, rather than give none of her attention or energy to her clients. When I asked for an other therapist I was dumbstruck at the treatment. We were told "Miss T is one of our best therapists!" My husband and I said we understood that, but she wasn't a good fit for S. We were offered a "testing" procedure (which our insurance never paid for) and then a "meeting." We were basically kicked out of the program mainly because we had been promised a Social Eating Program.... and they didn't have one "at the moment." (They had FOUR YEARS to accept her into a program.) and evidently asking for a new therapist is enough to get your child kicked out of their program.

 

We were told at the meeting, "There's nothing more we can do for S." I said, " Nothing has been done for S. in 18 months in therapy. She hasn't changed her eating habits at all, she still has food refusal, she still gags, no oral stimulation devices were used, no weighted vests were offered, and NO progress has been made." They made our daughter (who was not at the meeting) seem as if she as beyond help. I left SO angry and betrayed.

 

Well, she's 13 now, and still has fairly limited food choices. My other kids ate all organic, home grown, close to natural state foods. This child had ONE taste of a chicken nugget one day and wanted nothing else for years. (Yuck.) Now, she will eat white meat chicken breast, as long as it has breading on it, but she also tends to eat a LOT of starches, mac and cheese, soy milk (I have done the research and am NOT convinced that soy actually is used by the body as estrogen, so I have no problem with that) etc. She has lately been eating more fruits, some apples, bananas, occasionally some watermelon.... but no vegetables, except tomato sauce (that I have to subject to a submersion blender so it is totally smooth) and has lately been able to eat "green stuff" in her food (parsley and other herbs) as she used to PICK this all out one at a time and take hours to eat pasta with tomato sauce with herbs in it.

 

I do limit her cheese (I really hate dairy products) but she LOVES it. No fluid cow's milk, as I won't have it in the house. As for "not having poor choices in the house." We've done that, she simply doesn't eat. She has Sensory Issues and Aspergers, so she may not feel hunger as other people do. But, I will then notice blood sugar issues and irritability. The child needs to eat and will only eat her own small choice palate.

 

She was given some "whole food" vitamins, but we didn't see any results from them. She dose get calcium and probiotics. She does NOT have celiac nor any wheat allergies or intolerances. We've had her tested and she doesn't have symptoms. (She does have allergies to peanuts and fluid milk, but not hard cheeses or soy or wheat.)

 

I can't stress the "she isn't gluten intolerant" enough. I am very familiar with this condition, and this child doesn't have it. (I feel like I have to stress this a lot.)

 

It's her Sensory System and Integration and we're still trying to get better food into her. I'm not a fan of "tricking" kids by hiding things in foods they like (plus she has a STRONG sense of taste and always knows and then rejects the food and then doesn't trust me, so I'm NOT doing that again.)

 

It's frustrating, she's even said to me, "My food is boring."

 

Not sure if there is any cure except time. It has gotten better, she is more curious about new foods, but very cautious about them. She still has a very limited diet.

 

Sorry for the tome.


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Old 09-06-2013, 08:04 PM
 
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Wow! that sounds hard. I have no advice but learned so much from your post and you seem to be a very strong mama. *hugs* to you

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Old 09-06-2013, 08:36 PM
 
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Both of my girls have had trouble with eating issues, but your's sounds extreme.  However, I'll let you know my brief experience.  DD1 was never motivated by food, and she never connected eating with satiating her hunger until she was nearly 5.  She did have allergies.  We had one visit to an eating therapist who told me to let her eat pretty much whatever she wanted so she could start making positive connections with food.  So, yeah, between a bazillion allergies and this, my whole-foods pantry started looking like something from the junk aisle at the co-op!  She is still a little picky at 8.5, but never as picky as her little sister.  She likes her veggies and things like pickles and sauerkraut and lentils.  She does fairly well now.

 

DD2 came along and ate like a horse before she started getting really picky in ways that made me suspect some mild sensory issues (she could not eat if something that smelled strong was on the table).  She's getting a wee bit better, but she still gets teary sometimes when we go to a restaurant and they don't have the EXACT fries she needs, so she drinks some pop and makes the best of it.  She also doesn't have any food allergies, and yes, she's as thin as a rail.  I used to think she survived on air.

 

That's just so frustrating about the feeding therapist!  Hopefully things will become less frustrating.  They say that many chefs start off being extremely picky eaters growing up, their sense of taste and their sensitivity to smells and textures are phenomenal.  If she can pick out something lurking in some food, then she has all the makings of a gourmand.  How does she react to pictures of food?  

 

Good luck!  


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Old 09-07-2013, 12:12 AM
 
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 They say that many chefs start off being extremely picky eaters growing up, their sense of taste and their sensitivity to smells and textures are phenomenal.

I was thinking along similar lines - could she take cooking classes? I did a taster course at Polytech when I was a young teenager - six sessions over six weeks, and we learned to make quiche and Swiss rolls and similarly fun things. Or some places do mother-daughter cooking classes. It's very hard not to be curious to taste something you've cooked yourself. And even if she only learned to cook bland stuff, better homemade than not, right?

 

It sounds like the problem is actually beginning to solve itself - you said she's expanding her repertoire, and aware of the boringness of her diet. It's quite possible that left to her own devices she'll grow up to be a normal or only mildly quirky eater. Stranger things have happened!

 

I have one sister who was very picky as a kid, probably due to sensory issues/mild Aspieness. She couldn't stand to have her foods touching, she hated to hear other people chew, and she absolutely hated soup in any form. She lived mostly off carbs - I baked a lot as a kid, and she'd devour half a batch of brownies in hours - but she was always scary skinny and had to be put on Complan to gain weight.

 

Now she's, what? 28? 29? She still eats mostly carbs; she's still thin, though not worryingly so; and she still won't touch soup with a bargepole. Not noodle soup, not corn chowder, nothing. Weirdo. Soup is awesome. But... left to her own devices, she's slowly branching out. She tasted HAGGIS a while back! I was stunned. :p And she learned to cook pork and apple casserole. She'll eat duck. She can go to a restaurant with friends and not seem peculiar. She's... you know... not that bad. A few more green veggies probably wouldn't do her any harm, but you could say the same about me, and I'm an enthusiastic foodie who loves to cook!


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Old 09-07-2013, 09:19 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you, TracyAmber, SweetSilver and Smokering. I appreciate the support!

 

SweetSilver, you know what I'm going through. :joy It nearly killed me to buy chicken nuggets at the store (she wouldn't eat the ones I made or the ones the food therapist and she made, but the food therapist hid sweet potatoes in the nuggest and she took a tiny bite of one, gagged and pushed herself back from the table... then the therapist took them all home (I bought all the ingredients) saying, "My husband eats anything. He'll eat these." Can you tell I'm still a little angry at them?)

 

Now she prefers whole breast white meat chicken fingers (we think Doctor Who may have been a partial influence in that with his "chicken fingers an custard" because she asked me what custard was. I am going to make some with soy or rice milk very soon!) but, Smokering, you may be right, we may just need to ride this out and let it take its own course. She was a pre term baby, tiny and petite until about 7 when she caught up. Then, she got a little overweight. Now, at 13 she's eating much less of her own accord (we never said anything, the women in my family do tend to get a little fluffy during puberty and most of us end up with hourglass figures later) and she's really getting curvy as she grows. Most people think she's 16 or 17, which embarrasses her to no end. (She likes precision and anything not precise irritates her.) Like some of the other kids who were mentioned here, she doesn't like food touching other food. We've also had to leave restaurants when she was younger because certain smells, particularly vinegar, onions etc cause her to gag. Weird, though, she loves Balsamic Vinegar on her pasta.

 

Smokering, I have been trying to get her to cook with me, both my husband and I cook a lot. She only seems interested in when I'm making cakes, cookies or sweets. She will be taking cooking in Home Ec this year, and she seems to do really well when surrounded by peers when learning something new. The first time she ever ate watermelon was when a teacher brought it to school and all the other kids were chowing down on it and she told me, "They liked to so much, I had to taste it. I really liked it." She had been offered watermelon at home 1000 times and rejected it, so maybe after Home Ec we can look for a cooking class if she's interested. I also don't want to overwhelm her, though. She has Choir at school and always does the school play (odd for a child who doesn't seek out social situations, she adores Theater)  We learned very early that she does better with a lot of down time to do her thing.

 

But, maybe over Christmas we can look into a cooking class. Honestly, I think she might do better if I wasn't there for the class. She tends to let me do the talking and action if we're together, although she's getting better at speaking up for herself, too. She actually told, with no prompting, some of her teachers and the principal at Registration Day where we went on vacation with some details!  A year ago she never would have spoken up on her own with no prompting,  she would have just looked at me and poke me so I would answer for her. SLOW steps. I'm learning. Aspies is hard. Interesting as can be, but hard. (My husband is probably also Aspies (he has the Tourettes, too, but his symptoms are so mild now that no one would ever know) but he has the kind of Sensory System that is understimulated so he seeks out strongly flavored foods, Habenero peppers, hot sauce, and he eats virtually anything. Weird.)

 

Someone suggested freeze dried fruits. I did have some strawberries that were freeze dried. I gave her one yesterday, she examined it, smelled it and poked at it for about an hour then gave it to the dog. *sigh* I'll try again.

 

Thank you all again for your help, your support and your kindness. :Hug


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Old 09-12-2013, 10:52 AM
 
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I had to giggle a bit at her diet. I swear we could just call it the Aspergers diet. My kids with AS and sensory issues prefer the exact same foods. Chicken nuggets, mac and cheese, breads and cheese, no veggies except a bit of spaghetti sauce with no chunks, apples, bananas, watermelon. The only thing I would add for my 12 year old is he will eat a few red grapes if prompted. 

 

So here is what I do. My kiddo love cakes and cookies and all things bread. So we make healthy cookies, muffins, and pancakes. A great place to start is using pumpkin puree and making some pumpkin muffins or pancakes. Has she ever eaten carrot cake? You can make carrot muffins with a carrot cake recipe, just reduce the sugar a bit and leave off the frosting. Serve with milk and call it a meal. My kids will eat zucchini muffins or cookies as well. Since she likes to cook sweets she may really enjoy making and eating these and its a great way to get some Vit A rich veggies in.

 

Also smoothies. I will share my time honored picky kid recipe. First, if she's never had a smoothie, you might want to keep it super simple and just do an orange julius. Half OJ, half very vanilla soy milk (yum!) and some ice cubes. If she likes smoothies the next best thing to add is a cup of frozen blueberries and a couple spinach leaves. I have a super taster who can taste everything and he can't taste spinach in a smoothie. Any other green is a no go though, and I only use a small handful of fresh baby spinach leaves. The blueberries hide the color best. You can also add frozen strawberries or a very ripe banana with spots. Just make sure to puree the heck out of it so there are no visible green specks. A high powered blender is really helpful! (we have a Vitamix) Smoothies are the only source of green leafy veg I can get in my AS kids. 

 

As far as if it gets better....in our case yes. My 17 yr old with AS has vastly increased his acceptable foods. The hunger of puberty and some social pressures did it to him. I used to laugh thinking of him ordering a grilled cheese at the restaurant on his first date. No worries, he likes hamburgers and will even tolerate a little lettuce in the bun. He recently was exposed to Chinese food and he actually really likes it, especially orange chicken (ok its glorified chicken nuggets but it does have some flavor, right?) and he will also eat things like chicken fajitas or combination pizza without picking everything off. He likes this creamy potato broccoli soup I make and a tator tot casserole his grandma makes. So while his menu is not hugely broad his ability to tolerate more flavors and a few different textures has improved with time. He will be life long hater of beans though. Ain't nothing touching that one. :lol 


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Old 09-12-2013, 11:17 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Earthmama, "The Aspies Diet" I LOVE it! :rotflmao

 

My daughter is a Supertaster, too. I bought the Seinfeld book and we tried some of the recipes and she swore she could taste "icky vegetable taste" in ALL the stuff we made. *sigh* I've tried smoothies... she takes a sip or two, says she likes it and then it sits on the table until I throw it away the next day (or the dog knocks it over and eats it.) 

 

She has eaten pumpkin bread, and I make it and she loves it. Zucchini bread, not so much (Ug, you can see those bits of green in it and it seems to set her off.)  That does remind me that I should be making pumpkin bread more often. It's been so hot this summer, I haven't done as much home baking as I usually do. Her oldest sister used to make her pumpkin bread and bring over loaves of it, but she moved out of state a year ago, and we're missing her and her pumpkin bread.

 

Your kids sound just like my dd. I have noticed her getting more food even though her body is curving and changing with puberty. I am hoping those teenage hunger pains will help. Your son eats burgers now? That's fantastic. I wish I could get a burger (veggie or meat, I really don't care at this point) into my girl. We're hoping she makes more food changes as she gets older. It's amazing, she ate Sweet Sour Chicken (with NO sauce on it) the last time we ordered Chinese food! It was the first time she had eaten anything from an Asian restaurant except a bowl of rice. Plus, she now prefers Annies Mac and Cheese with the Whole Wheat Pasta, and has asked to try the one with Brown Rice Pasta, so things are getting a little better. (I forgot rice, the kid could eat rice every day.)

 

Does your kids also not eat breakfast? That always worries me because I'm afraid she'll get hungry in the morning at school. She'll drink a half a glass of soy milk, or some juice (juice blend or home made lemonade, she won't do orange juice "It burns!") and eat a few bites of something, but really no breakfast to speak of. She says it makes her nauseous in the morning and I do respect that, but now that school has started she can't just grab a snack when she feels like it. Luckily a lot of her teachers serve health snacks mid morning (they all said it helps with kids' concentration) but not always every day.

 

I find it amazing that Aspies kids are often so similar. Down to the food choices they make as they get older. I almost started to cry when I saw your ds ate Orange Chicken. Sweet and Sour Chicken has the same base... but again, no sauce. At least it's a piece of real chicken breast and not that horrible mashed up chicken nuggets she used to demand when she was younger.

 

Thank you for commiserating with me. It's good to know other moms are going through the same thing I am.


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Old 09-12-2013, 02:02 PM
 
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They like toast in the morning, or bagels are also a favorite. There a handful of cereals they like. Now that DS (17) is older he likes coffee with lots of vanilla creamer. So he will have that and toast, sometimes with peanut butter on it. They will eat gobs of pancakes if I make them but I am usually too lazy to do that on weekdays. I sometimes buy toaster waffles but they are expensive. Honestly dinners around here are the worst meal for us. I have this feeling of dread come over me every day around 4 o'clock when its time to think about cooking dinner and we can play the "Who Is Going to Throw a Fit Tonight" game. I swear they draw straws. 


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Old 09-12-2013, 02:08 PM
 
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Heh. My Aspie-ish sister would still happily live off mac and cheese, rice, rice pudding and bread with cheese! Oh, she adores custard in any form as well - what does your DD think about that? How about panna cotta? With coconut cream, perhaps?

 

Out of curiosity, do your Aspie kids have distinctive handwriting? I have a half-baked theory that there's 'Aspie handwriting'. Me and my sisters, DH, and a clinically-diagnosed Aspie friend all have very similar handwriting. It's very small, very neat, and sort of rounded and child-like - printing rather than cursive. Looks a bit like one of those fake handwriting fonts. Anyone? (Sorry, off-topic!)

 

Does she like pumpkin pie? I can see how the texture might be appealing, and if she likes pumpkin bread... worth a shot?

 

You mentioned being anti-dairy - does that include 'holier-than-thou' dairy like raw, organic, pastured milk? It seems like it would be a good way of getting calories into her and a bit more variety. Custard, mac and cheese etc made with real milk has got to be yummier than with soy milk, right? (But then, I'm a huge dairy fan, vaguely TF by philosophy and have never liked soy milk... tastes differ!) My Aspie sister would have eaten whipped cream by the bucketload, not to mention cream cheese and so on. I don't know if it's something you're willing to compromise on, of course, but from a taste and texture perspective dairy is awesome. :p

 

If she likes pumpkin bread, she might like spiced apple cake (where the apple is very finely whizzed in the food processor - no chunks), hummingbird cake (pineapple and banana) or carrot cake? Not the healthiest things ever, but hey, variety. You can do chocolate beetroot cakes too, but that might be pushing it. :p A lot of those recipes work well with half wholemeal flour, too.


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Old 09-12-2013, 03:13 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Earthmama, sounds like my house. She has peanut allergies and won't eat other nut butters, though. The dinner thing, sheesh, I know! I always said I would not make different meals for every kid, but at this point she makes her own dinner most of the time.... of course having pizza or pasta if my husband is having pizza (and with my severe dairy allergies, I'm the one eating something else.) I just remember years ago, when I would just make ONE meal for everybody.

 

She loves toaster waffles and my home made pancakes, yep, I'm too lazy or busy to make them in the morning. Plus, she gets nauseous from food if she's been up less than 2 hours, so I'm resigned to letting her have soy milk and a handful of cereal or toast, if she'll even have that. And a glass of juice with some Mira Lax in it..... Spectrum GI problems, as per usual.... help.gif

 

Thank you again for your input. It makes me feel less alone. :Hug


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Old 09-12-2013, 03:26 PM
 
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The dinner thing, sheesh, I know! I always said I would not make different meals for every kid, but at this point she makes her own dinner most of the time.... of course having pizza or pasta if my husband is having pizza (and with my severe dairy allergies, I'm the one eating something else.) I just remember years ago, when I would just make ONE meal for everybody.

 

Oh, I gave up on this years ago.  Between competing allergies and my youngest's pickiness, the one meal idea had to go.  I consider it a victory that dd2 doesn't gag anymore when something she doesn't like is on the table (we have never made her eat anything, not even "one bite", so this was a genuine response to a new sensitivity).  I'm thrilled when she finds a new food she likes.  If it's something other than fritos or samoas (girl scout cookies), if it's broccoli and raw kale from the garden, I am beside myself.  Though, I try to keep reactions low key on the outside.


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Old 09-12-2013, 03:44 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for weighing in, Smokering. I have severe dairy allergies and lactose intolerance, as do all my kids. I'm an old school hippy and equate a lot of dairy with mucous production, increase in other allergies, GI problems etc. I know some people can eat it, but we can't, my heritage is Mediterranean, and many of us just can't eat much dairy at all. I can't touch the stuff, except for butter, (no proteins and little lactose.) My youngest DD can eat hard cheeses in small amounts, but not fluid milk or much soft cheese.

 

She actually likes her soy milk, and makes her mac and cheese with.. water. :yum   (I put water on cereal, she eats her cereal dry.) I'm pretty sure she's getting enough calories, she was actually a little overweight in early puberty, but she's increased activity (she's a bookish Aspies kid and has to be pushed to move around much) and is actually eating less than she was a few years ago.  If I do make the custard, it will be soy based. She loves her soy milk (or rice milk.) She's never even tasted cow milk, so there's nothing for her to miss. :)  She drank my milk for 4.5 years and went right to soy milk or rice milk, and back then soy or rice based cheeses, so it's fairly ingrained "This is how this stuff is supposed to taste." :yum

 

I'm going to try the breads/cakes one at at time. If she can see or taste vegetables or anything inconsistent in her food, she either spends hours picking the "weird stuff" out or simply refuses to eat it. She wants her food to be ALL one color. Any variation is viewed with suspicion.

 

She's also a "Supertaster" and can taste virtually every ingredient in food. Anything with a strong "vegetable" flavor and she will immediately start to gag, and will vomit if the food isn't removed from her sight and her ability to smell it. Aspies sucks, despite it being kind of awesome.  S. probably would eat whipped cream by the bucket full, but then her chronic constipation would act up (she can go 5-7 days without a stool, then go through excruciating pain to finally go after 2-3 days trying, and....TMI here.... it's about as big around as a wine bottle.)  Aspies kids have very usual GI symptoms and we know too much dairy will trigger severe symptoms that will make her terribly ill. So, no, the whole dairy thing is not really an option for her or for most people in our family. We don't eat it,in any quantity so nobody misses it. My husband and vegetarian middle daughter can eat hard cheeses, but nobody touches fluid milk or soft unripened cheeses, (except for pizza, then my dh gets such gas he's in agony. I sit there with my Annies frozen dinner or my Soy Pizza and just shake my head at him. He well aware at what it does to him. *sigh*) As a rule, we don't eat dairy, it just makes us all sick.  So, I'm fairly firm on not increasing her dairy intake.

 

As for the handwriting, yes, very weird! Her handwriting almost looks like a computer font. She never learned to write cursive in school (and we had other things on our minds and haven't gotten around to it) but her handwriting is really neat and small. My husband, who most likely also has Aspies (he's an Engineer. and a very... detailed man...) has completely illegible handwriting as do I. Very interesting observation. It probably goes along with Aspies people needing to be very precise about things.


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Old 09-12-2013, 04:33 PM
 
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Heh - fair enough on the dairy! Wasn't sure where you were coming from on that, is all. :) Mac and cheese with water? Craziness! I don't suppose she'd sub in chicken stock? I use chicken stock in place of water wherever I can - in sauces, gravies, the liquid for cooking rice - partly because it's amazingly delicious and partly because of the nutrients. But it might be too 'scary' for your DD...?

 

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As for the handwriting, yes, very weird! Her handwriting almost looks like a computer font. She never learned to write cursive in school (and we had other things on our minds and haven't gotten around to it) but her handwriting is really neat and small. My husband, who most likely also has Aspies (he's an Engineer. and a very... detailed man...) has completely illegible handwriting as do I. Very interesting observation. It probably goes along with Aspies people needing to be very precise about things. 

Ha! Cool. Yes, my Aspie-ish dad has abysmal handwriting too. Maybe it goes to one extreme or the other? My own mother has confused DH's handwriting for mine - the similarity is striking. And my sisters and I all have very similar writing, which I used to think was just how it was in families - but now I'm not so sure. Fascinating, the whole spectrum thing...


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Old 09-12-2013, 04:37 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I hear ya, Sweet Silver. I had always said "I'll never make different meals for picky kids." Hahahahahahaaa! I was so naive. Of course, when I was younger, I had no idea what neuro issues could do to one's diet. Also, as many people I was a perfect mother.... then I had kids. :rotflmao

 

We just had the "what are we having for dinner" convo about 10 minutes ago, when my husband came home. My youngest is finally starting to show some interest in what the rest of us are eating. Tonight she said she "might" try some pulled pork.... but is saving some tomato soup (yep, out of a can) in the event that she doesn't like the pork or can't eat it. At least she's thinking about trying it. A year ago she would have preemptively gagged thinking about pulled pork and eaten some chicken nuggets.


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Old 09-12-2013, 05:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
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No, no chicken stock. It's too "Gravy like." She wouldn't touch it. We had some problems with her actually over eating a few years ago, when she first started puberty.  She could eat an entire pizza at a sitting at 10. Her doctor wanted to test her thyroid, but we decided to wait on it. She was eating a lot of empty calories. I'm kind of a water fiend. I have some health issues (Fibromyalgia, migraines and UTIs) so I drink about a gallon of water a day. I actually substitute water for a lot of things other people use milk or stock for in cooking and baking. Not surprising, I'm a Supertaster, too. I also have a crazy sensitive sense of smell. Pregnancy was unbearable for me in the aroma department, I spent half my pregnancies with my shirt over my nose.  I had to train myself to eat more foods as I got older, my mother is also a Supertaster, eating little more than plain hamburgers and fries and baked potatoes and canned vegetables when I was a kid. My dad is Italian, so I never could pass by pastas and sauces (even though my mother would make faces at it... yes, the plot thickens... LOL) but I was a moderately picky eater until I got older. I was never in the same league as my now 13 year old, (let's just call her Sage and get it over with. :happyt I always ate veggies and fruit and never bothered me if my food touched other food etc. I am pretty sure I'm not Aspies.

 

Asperger's Syndrome has only been diagnosed for less than about 20 years, so I know there's a lot the "experts" don't know about it. I'm glad we have the dx, though. It makes life easier because I can explain a lot of what my child does without people going on about "I wouldn't put up with that, just make her eat it!" (I've NEVER made a child eat if they didn't want to, never even had a "one bite" rule. My older kids always were very adventurous in the food department. Now that we know our youngest child has a definite neurological basis for her eccentricities, it's easier to explain to people.

 

She used to deny she had Aspergers. I found a bunch of people she admires (Albert Einstein, Bill Gates, Temple Grandin, Nikola Tesla, Thomas Edison) who have Aspies and it made it interesting for her,  and she understands that it actually has it's advantages. I wonder if Tesla was a picky eater? :bgbounce


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Old 09-12-2013, 06:18 PM
 
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My 17 yo is neurotypical, but he has many of the same issues.  He eats primarily what we call "pre chewed food".  Burgers (plain), chicken nuggets or patties, hot dogs ( I know but the kids gotta eat :) ) peanut butter on a bagel, spaghetti with plain sauce and macaroni and cheese.  I didn't know about eating therapy when he was little but he wouldn't have cared for any of the bribes.  I can't keep celery in the house because the smell makes him gag.  and he wouldn't do any type of smoothy or milk shake because they are "grainy".   What really helped was taking a gourmet foods class in high school last year.  It really expanded what he will try.  He doesn't always like it but he will try a miniscule bite - like 1cm x 1cm.  He will now eat both mushrooms and olives, which I won't ;-).

 

Our family joke is that his bride will have to have a peanut butter sandwich hidden somewhere in the folds of her dress or he won't eat at his own wedding....

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Old 09-13-2013, 12:51 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you for your response, 34me. It's hard, I know. It does make me feel better that I'm not the only one. The wedding thing is hilarious. I can see Sage asking the wait staff for some boiling water and cracking open an instant mac and cheese at her wedding. :rotflmao

 

Mushrooms? Wow, he really has come far. I gag when I see them. (Hmm, might not be all from Dad's side...)

 

I'm fomenting an idea about a "Parenting the Aspies Child" daughter board sometime, maybe?


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