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#61 of 176 Old 07-24-2004, 05:26 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Sprouts are the tiny plant/vegetable that forms when you subject whole wheat berries, or other grains and seeds to water. Here are some reasons to do this.

TEN REASONS FOR SPROUTING, IN GENERAL

1. ONLY PENNIES PER SERVING
One tablespoon of seeds will fill a quart jar with several ounces of sprouts. A 4-ounce package will yield several pounds.

2. SIMPLE AND EASY
Take less than a minute per day to grow and prepare. They will grow nearly anywhere indoors, in any season. Sprouts require very little space and travel well. They are the ideal vegetables for campers, boaters and RV’ers with limited space for fresh produce!

3. FRESH AND READY QUICKLY
This “garden in your kitchen” grows very fast, in any kind of weather. No digging, planting, weeding, pests or chemicals involved. And there’s no long wait, as in seasonal outdoor gardens. Just 3 to 7 days to a bountiful, nutrition-packed harvest. When stored in your refrigerator, they will stay fresh for days- even weeks if rinsed properly.

4. TOXIN-FREE FOOD
Sprouts are as sweet and pure as Nature intended food to be. Buy organic seeds and grains to sprout, though!

5. COMPLETE FOODS
Sprouts are real health food. They are full of life- as you will see in how fast and luxuriously they grow. The right combination of sprouts contains everything needed for life and health. All their many nutritional elements are easily assimilated and readily available to your body. When home-grown, you know they are pure, and you can enjoy them at the peak of their perfection.

6. TASTY AND DELICIOUS
Bursting with flavor, you may be surprised how truly delectable they are. Enjoy them in salads, on sandwiches, stir-fried, steamed, or even baked in wholesome, home-made breads.

7. HIGHLY NUTRITIOUS
Several contain more protein than cooked meat-at a tiny fraction of the cost. The presence and balance of amino acids makes this protein more digestible. All sprouts are rich in vitamins, minerals, trace elements, enzymes, and fiber. When exposed to light, several become rich in chlorophyll.

8. LOW IN CALORIES/FAT
These are simple sugars for quick energy. Sprouts contain no cholesterol and provide several essential fatty acids.

9. HELP DETOX YOUR BODY
Chlorophyll helps cleanse and oxygenate the blood. Enzymes aid in the digestion and assimilation of nutrients, and contribute to the body’s life force. Fiber aids elimination and their lecithin helps the body get rid of cholesterol. A raw food diet is one of the best ways to detox your body.

10. BUILD YOUR IMMUNE SYSTEM
Antioxidants protect you from radiation and toxic chemicals. They help the body to cleanse, detox, rebuild and heal itself. Sprouts are rich in antioxidants and help protect you from the modern health scourge — toxic build-up. Antioxidant enzymes are especially important, because they are essential for the proper function of the immune system. Sprouts are one of the best sources for these important nutrients.

SOME INFO ABOUT BREADS:

Dead Breads

Wheat and wheat-based breads are a staple food in the diet of over half the world's population. Unfortunately in the new millennium, many breads on supermarket shelves are not very nutritious. During the milling process the live portion with most of the nutrients - the germ - is removed to prevent spoilage. Along with it goes the wheat bran or fiber that aids elimination. What remains is basically a sticky starch. To this is added a host of chemical additives which make white bread one of the most chemically-contaminated foodstuffs available today.

'Alive' Sprouted Wheat Breads

Now consider a completely natural, unadulterated, uncontaminated alternative - sprouted wheat bread. All you need is 2 cups of red winter wheat. Nothing else. After three days of sprouting, when the sprout is as long as the berry which it springs:

Vitamin B-12 content has quadrupled to around 54 milligrams per 100 grams (versus just 1 milligram in white bread).

* Other B vitamins have increased 3 to 12 times.

* Vitamin E content has tripled

* Starches are now simple sugars like maltose.

* Minerals are freed up for easy assimilation.

* Enzymes are plentiful and have converted starches to sugars, proteins to amino acids, and fats into essential fatty acids.

* Now contains 3 to 4 times more fiber than stone-ground whole wheat bread.

Thanks to the natural sugars, sprouted wheat bread is sweet as well as nutritious.

I will Post simple sprouting instructions and a 'Sprouted' Wheat Bread Recipe' in next post, to keep this a bit shorter.
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#62 of 176 Old 07-24-2004, 05:36 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I say, Whole Wheat, but you could do this with rye, spelt, etc as well.

Sprout 2 cups of grain. (I know I posted a proceedure for this, and it's easily available info. But if you want it posted in this thread for convenience, just let me know )

Once you have sprouts from your grain, as long as the original grain was:

MAKING SPROUTED BREAD

Allow the wheat sprouts to drain and dry for 3 to 6 hours before grinding. Spread them on a 'cookie sheet' and leave in a warm dry place, or set in the oven with the light on. You could also preheat the oven to LOWEST setting, then turn it off and put cookie sheets in oven to dry sprouts. Wet sprouts will not grind well and will create too much moisture in the dough.

Use a food processor, wheat grass juicer or meat grinder, NOT a grain grinder! - WHOO HOO for many of us Other juicers or blenders are not designed to grind and should not be used.

After grinding, you should end up with a smooth paste. Lumpy, coarse or chunky dough will not work nearly as well, and should be ground a second time. Now you are ready to form the loaves.

After washing your hands to prepare, you have two options.

You can oil your hands with an olive, sunflower or sesame seed oil and knead the dough, folding it into itself several times. This will spread the gluten and help the bread stick together and rise better.

Or you can go straight to shaping the loaves before popping them in the oven.

Just form balls of dough about three inches in diameter. You should get 2 to 4 loaves from the 2 cups of wheat you began with. Place them on a flat baking tray such as a cookie sheet.

You may wish to dust the tray with cornmeal or sesame seeds to prevent sticking. Oiling a baking tray is not recommended because heat makes oils indigestible.

Now flatten each ball to a height of about 1 1/2 inches and a diameter of 4 to 5 inches.

For a tastier bread, you may wish to mix your own "additives" into the dough. You can add dates, raisins, chopped nutmeats, nut butters, coconut, cinnamon, vanilla, etc. for a real taste treat.

SLOW-BAKING!!

You can't rush sprout bread!! This is PARAMOUNT to good sprouted Bread!

Pre-heat your oven to 250 degrees F and place the baking tray with loaves on the center rack. Bake for 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 hours, depending on the size of your patties and you oven.

This low temperature, long- term baking method preserves most of the nutrients from heat. Although the oven temperature may be 250 degrees, the temperature inside the loaves is about 100 degrees cooler.

You may wish to use a spatula midway in the baking to lift the bread from the tray to prevent sticking. The bread is ready when the top of each loaf is firm to the touch but not hard. The loaves should still be moist like brownies when removed from the oven. A solar oven is GREAT for doing this!!

This delicious sprouted wheat bread is denser, chewier, sweeter and tastier than breads make with flour.

This method of using sprouted grains in bread-making goes back to biblical times.

Such breads can become a major improvement in you and your family's diets.

You will get plenty of protein, while consuming fewer calories, very little fat and no pesticide residues, processing contaminants or chemical additives.

You will enjoy better digestion because of the enzymes and the fiber will aid regularity. By including sprouted wheat bread in your diet, you will be getting the real staff of life for nutritional support.

You may even experience a corresponding boost in energy and health which the living germ of the grain can help bestow.

There are as many ways to use sprouts in cooking as there are for any vegetables. The difference here is that you will want to cook the sprouts as little as possible in order to protect their vital nutrients. Use your imagination.

I hope you enjoy this recipe!

Good Eats!
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#63 of 176 Old 07-24-2004, 06:14 PM
 
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That's like essene bread, right? I love that stuff. Sprouting intimidates me. :
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#64 of 176 Old 07-24-2004, 06:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Yes, you got that right. The Essenes actually believed in eating all raw (low low heated) sprouted foods. They were the 'ultimate' vegetarians and pretty interesting belief system. (An entire new thread topic, won't go there here)

I think it's a neat way to live, but hard to do unless you enjoy being in the kitchen LOTS. I was debating trying to diet by only make 'sprouted' breads to go with some fresh fruits and veges and seeing what happened. Two kids, and a 'for sure' meat eater hubby makes it difficult.

TTYL
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#65 of 176 Old 07-25-2004, 12:35 AM
 
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We tried to go all raw for awhile. About every 5 days we would break down and gorge on bread. I think it's a little easier to the the Natural Hygiene deal where it's like 70-80% raw. (Not that we do that either, but in a perfect world)

I'll have to try to make the sprouted bread, when it cools down a bit.
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#66 of 176 Old 07-27-2004, 04:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ok, here are some 'experiment' results. No grain grinder needed!

I soaked some whole wheat berries and spelt until it 'sprouted' two days later. I used two quart mason jars, some mesh netting from a bag of garlic (cut into two pieces to fit over jar top) and the metal band part of the lid assembly. (Directions for sprouting are posted, so not going into detail. But it took two days to make 'tiny sprouts'.)

I then dried it on two baking sheets, left in the oven for a day and night, with light on. It dried quite nicely!

I then just used my blender to 'grind' it into a fine flour. It's in two mason jars in the refridgerator now. I didn't freeze it, as I wanted to use it fairly soon.

It has a 'slightly' grainy texture and tastes 'sweet'.

So, 'instant' use, no soaking required, 'whole grain' flour for making cookies, breads or quick breads with no alterations needed!

It's been sprouted for the optimizing of nutritional value, the sprouts where then dried and 'lightly' heated this way, which neutralized 'irritants' that can be in baby sprouts, and it's pre-ground! What more can we ask for!
...ok, maybe a cook, housekeeper, full time babysitter...

I'm baking cookies with it (or maybe brownies) in a few hours. I will post results!


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#67 of 176 Old 07-30-2004, 03:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Making homemade tortillas with the 'sprouted, dried, ground' wheat tonight....wish me luck

I'm also roasting a 'pork loin' with some garlic and a touch of soy. Gonna 'shred' it for making green chili to top the torts with.

Heather's Green Chili

1 pork roast seasoned with garlic and a touch of soy sauce.
(Optional add chopped onion now to cook with roast)
Put 1/4 cup water in pan with roast, cover with tin foil to bake
Cook in oven at 350 for a few hours, until 'fall apart tender'.


Shred cooked pork into big pot and add in:

1-2 cans green chilies
1-2 tsp HOT Jalepeno's or a small can if you brave
3-4 cans diced tomatoes or tomatoes with chilies (fresh diced tomatoes if you have that luxury from garden!)

1-2 tsp fresh ground cummin
1 tsp sea salt
1/2 tsp fresh ground black pepper (or to taste)
1-2 tsp onion powder or dice a fresh white/yellow onion and add.
I also sometimes add in any left over 'salsa' that I like. It makes the 'green chili' thicker and tastier.

Simmer until onion is cooked and all ingredients are heated through. I then mix:

1-2 tablespoons Arrowroot powder and add enough water to make a thin paste. Add to hot green chili and stir. This will thicken the chili and make it 'cling' to your burrito or open face 'smothered' tortillas.

Heat up some black beans, shred lettuce and cheese, dice some green onions, make sure you have plenty of sour cream if you made it hot!

You can let the green chili 'simmer' on low in a crock pot until ready to serve dinner. The other stuff is easy to whip up, (unless you making your own torts. I usually start tortillas about 30 minutes before I want to 'serve'. Hubby plays "soux chef" with the other fixings, and we have a super yummy "family night" type dinner ready!
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#68 of 176 Old 07-30-2004, 04:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ok, here is the chicken soup (gumbo) recipe I promised:

The secret to this 'hearty' soup, is making a 'roux' to add in to thicken it. It 'binds' the flavors and really makes a big difference to the taste. I do this especially on cold nights, and usually keep the soup 'lighter' and brothier in summer.

Hearty Chicken Soup

In a large pot, bring to Boil, then simmer until tender (about 1 hour):

1 whole chicken (frozen is fine, just add another hour and make sure there is no 'giblet' pouch inside it.
2 bay leaves


When done, turn off heat, remove chicken, let COOL!
Strain broth and save.
Pick chicken off bones and save the meat.

[Sometimes I just use frozen chicken breasts (3-4) and boil for 1 hour with bay leaves. Then chop up when cooled. The broth isn't as 'tasty' but is still good.]

While chicken is cooling or cooking, I get ready the following:

Chop up 1 small bag carrots (Probably 10 or so),
Chop up a few parsnips if you like them.
Chop up 1 white/yellow onion
,

I then make the Roux.

Heat in a heavy pot (Dutch oven type, preferrable) on medium-high heat:
1/3 cup all purpose unbleached flour
1/3 cup cooking oil
(I like grapeseed oil, but any lightly flavored oil will work. Olive is a bit 'heavy tasting', but I have used it.)
Stir until smooth and then turn the heat down to medium and continue stirring for about 10 minutes (Use a whisk).
You want it to golden brown, NOT burnt. If it goes past the 'nutty smelling stage' to burnt stage, it will make soup taste 'burnt'. Cook until light to medium brown. You can go on the light side, if you are nervous about it the first time you do it.

Ok, here is the exciting part. When you start adding liquid, it makes the really hot flour particles 'explode' and absorb really fast. You might get a few splatters, so use a long handled spoon to stir and make sure the little ones are NOT near.

Add in the onions, stir. Then add in the carrots and any parsnips. This helps to take some of the 'steam' out of potential 'splashing.' Let this cook for a few minutes. Then I SLOWLY SLOWLY add in a little of the chicken broth. Once you have incorporated in all the broth, add in the chopped up chicken meat.
Reduce heat to low and cover and simmer for about 40 minutes or the vegetables are tender enough to eat.

I've played with the roux mixture and have actually made it with 1/2 cup oil, 1/2 cup flour, and up to 1 cup of each. 1/3 of each seems just right. You can serve it over rice too, makes it more like a 'gumbo'.

This is a REALLY tasty chicken soup, don't let the 'roux' part scare you! Play with the vegetables. Sometimes I throw in cut up potatoes and chopped bits of okra and I've even put in cut up sausage for the DH who LOVES that.

Let me know what you think if you make it!
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#69 of 176 Old 08-01-2004, 02:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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sorry about forgetting to add eggs in the 'sin cookie' recipe...but hey, anyone make them with no eggs, if so, how'd they turn out?

nak
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#70 of 176 Old 08-09-2004, 09:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I burnt out my grinder...actually, like an idiot, I accidentally put in some grains that were not erm...completely dry!

Anyway, now all I can get out of it is goo....thank goodness it has a lifetime warranty!

Help, I'm grinderless! (Using the blender lots....)

Ordered a 'hand flaker' assembly to use for oats. If I like it, I'll let you know. (Someone had asked about what brand...etc)

I made applesauce-oatmeal cookies with 'sprouted, dried, ground' wheat and flaked oats... Talk about yummy!

I'm working on a spelt cookie recipe currently. Kinda like chewy oats when flaked...

Anyone made the tortilla or bread recipes lately? I made 'potato water' version, OMG it turned out good! Great pizza crust!
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#71 of 176 Old 08-12-2004, 03:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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This is just TOOO good not to share. Made it with peaches, but apples work great too.

Peach Cottage Pudding

1 cup all purpose, unbleached flour (or whole wheat)
1 tsp baking powder
1/4 tsp sea salt
1/3 cup butter, room temp soft
1 tsp vanilla ext
1/3 cup Rapadura sugar (or white)
1 egg
1/2 cup whole milk
4 large fresh peaches (or apples)
1 tsp ground cinnamon

Sprinkle Topping:
1/4 cup Rapadura sugar
Fresh ground nutmeg
cinnamon

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375 deg F.

Mix flour, baking powder, salt and 1 tsp cinnamon in bowl. Set aside.

Cream butter and sugar until mixed well. Add in vanilla and egg and blend until fluffy.

Add in flour and milk, alternately, and mix until a smooth batter forms.

Wash, peel and cut into slices, fresh peaches (or apples). Place in the bottom of an 8 in quiche pan, shallow casserole or deep dish pie pan.

Sprinkle half of the 1/4 cup sugar on top of peaches (apples). If they are really sweet, use less. Grate some fresh nutmeg over the top and sprinkle lightly with cinnamon.

Pour batter over top (there will be some gaps, it's ok). Sprinkle batter with any remaining sugar and sprinkle lightly with cinnamon again.

Bake at 375 deg F for 40-45 min. Serve hot/warm with vanilla ice cream or lightly whipped, sweetened cream or or 'cool whip' type topping.

Also, it's Great cold the next day...:sheepish:
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#72 of 176 Old 08-13-2004, 01:42 PM
 
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Hey! That sounds sooo yummy! I'm afraid to ask, but do you make your own icecream too!!!! And if you buy, is there a brand w/o refined sugar?

That's awesome that your grinder will be repaired for free!! Wow! So care to explain why you put in wet grains.. hehe!!

Coconut oil hyena? Did you make that up for yourself? It's cute! I just fried some eggs in CO. Yummy! And it makes *the* best popcorn! Yum! Yum! Yum! I saw yum too much!

I just saw your pic!!! You guys are so beautiful! I love seeing what people look like! I knew you'd have long dark hair, too!!!
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#73 of 176 Old 08-13-2004, 03:08 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goatlady
Hey! That sounds sooo yummy! I'm afraid to ask, but do you make your own icecream too!!!! And if you buy, is there a brand w/o refined sugar?
We used to make it all the time on the farm. I've gotten out of the practise, or I'd be eating it ALL the time!

I'm sure I could adapt a recipe for using Rapadura sugar and maybe some coconut oil or something unique. I used to make sugar free stuff for way back when I low carbed...but it wasn't the greatest tasting.... There is a post about B&J organic ice cream, I'm not 100% sure of the ingredients...I'm afraid to start buying ...errrr....more like eating it all the time!

Quote:
Originally Posted by goatlady
That's awesome that your grinder will be repaired for free!! Wow! So care to explain why you put in wet grains.. hehe!!
Erm....long story short, my sprouted sunflower seeds were NOT totally dry and made 'sunflower seed butter' inside the mechanism....unfortunately it's factory sealed and impossible to get out on your own! :

Quote:
Originally Posted by goatlady
Coconut oil hyena? Did you make that up for yourself? It's cute!
Erm....no, someone did a DDDDC on me after my blabbering on and on about VCO...there is a coconut oil thread where I found out about my new nickname...I guess it's fitting , but I can't help but love the stuff....

Quote:
Originally Posted by goatlady
I just saw your pic!!! You guys are so beautiful! I love seeing what people look like! I knew you'd have long dark hair, too!!!
Ohhhhh geeez...thank you! I usually have bangs, but was letting them grow out...kinda styled like a TV warrior princess you might have heard of...(ergo my moniker). Do I sound like 'long dark hair' type, or from my xenabyte name did you think that? I'm always curious about what people look like after getting to know them online too!

I feel blessed to have such cutie pie kids and the DH still makes my heart throb with lots of (Just celebrated 11 years).

And...now you got me thinking about making some organic ice cream....I better find the freezer crank...toddler been playing with it and ran off and hid it...
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#74 of 176 Old 08-13-2004, 08:45 PM
 
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What does a dark and long haired woman sound like anyhow? I probably thought you looked that way because of your name Xena, though it was probably unconscious. I don't konw. Course I know a Heather IRL who has long brown hair so maybe that? I just picture people a certain way but I'm wrong a lot too!!! I just pictured you as a hippie type with freshly milled wheat in your fists while protesting another Pillsbury flour factory chanting about them destroying our food supply and whatnot! Just your average MDC foodie!!!
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#75 of 176 Old 08-14-2004, 12:36 AM - Thread Starter
 
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: :LOL

I guess some might call me kinda crunchy, but really, I went to a very conservative college and I guess I'm just going back to my roots of being raised on a small farm in the 70s....

Though environmental pollution does really tick me off...
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#76 of 176 Old 08-16-2004, 12:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Bumping for Mama...
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#77 of 176 Old 08-18-2004, 10:52 PM
 
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I'm making the peach cottage pudding! I can't wait! I'll post later after it's been eaten!
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#78 of 176 Old 08-19-2004, 01:37 AM
 
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Oh this was great! DH says my peaches weren't ripe enough but I think they were fine!! We made some whipped cream and it was delicious!!! Now I will probably ahve some for breakfast tomorrow! Thanks for posting.

In case anyone cares, the changes I made were to use ww pastry flour instead of white, rapadura, closer to 1/2 cup butter since the butter wrapper was off and I didn't feel like weighing!
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#79 of 176 Old 08-19-2004, 12:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Oh I'm so glad someone made the Peach Cottage Pudding. It really is yummy. I have used really tart apples and upped the sugar a bit, and that turned out tasty!

I ....er....we, yea we...me and the toddler and my dad...yea, we almost ate all of it before DH finally got around to having a bowl of it...hahah...I told him 'You snooze, you loose!'
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#80 of 176 Old 08-24-2004, 03:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Sweet Berry Bread

For 1 8x4 loaf pan you will need:

2 cups all-purpose, unbleached flour or whole wheat (it makes it grainer, though.
1/2 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 cup soft butter
1 cup Rapadura Sugar (or white)
1/2 tsp almond or vanilla extract
2 eggs
1 cup crushes, hulled fresh strawberries or frozen and thawed can be used.

Directions:

Stir together flour, salt, baking powder and soda. Set aside.
In a medium bowl, combine butter, sugar and extract. Cream until smooth. Add eggs one at a time and beat will to mix after each one. Add flour and berries, and mix until just blended.

Grease a 8x4 loaf pan. Line the bottom with a piece of waxed paper, then grease the paper.

Pour batter into pan and smooth the top with a spoon.

Bake at 325 deg F for about 50-60 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in center comes our clean.

Let bread stand in pan on a rack for 10 minutes. Turn the loaf out onto the rack and peel off the paper, turning bread right side up to let it cool completely.

When cold, you can wrap it in an airtight cover and it will keep at room temp for a day (if you can wait that long) before slicing it to eat. (It 'ages' the flavor, if you can wait.)
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#81 of 176 Old 08-25-2004, 03:28 PM
 
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xenabyte, I made your whole wheat tortillas last night - BIG hit with dh!! Thank you for posting the recipe!

Now I'm excited to try your 'fridge pizza crust, but I was wondering what you do differently to make it into sourdough bread. I scanned the thread but it is so darn long, forgive me if I missed it!
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#82 of 176 Old 08-25-2004, 04:38 PM - Thread Starter
 
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THANK YOU! They are my DH's favorite too. The toddler calls them 'mini bean pizzas' heheh.

I thought it would just be easier to edit my 'pizza' dough recipe for just bread making. Then it's easier for you to 'copy' and print, etc.

Basic Sour Dough Bread – Overnight version

In a large NON METAL bowl (or crock), mix:

2 cups whole wheat flour or white, unbleached, all purpose flour (or a mix of each)
2 cups warm water
1 teaspoon of Instant SAF yeast or one little packet (the kind that comes in three little sections)
1 teaspoon of 'Rapadura Brand' Whole Organic Sugar (or honey or regular white sugar)

Stir together with plastic or wood spoon. It will look 'soupy' soft, almost like a lumpy, thick cake batter. This is your 'starter'.

Cover bowl/crock with a clean dish towel or plastic wrap (on loose) so 'gasses' can escape and let 'sour' for 4-24 hours. Also, be careful where you sit this, if you use too small a bowl, you might end up with some on your counter top!

Next day or morning (a minimum of 4 hours, up to 24 hours later), ADD:

1 stick of cooled, melted butter, or 1/2 cup olive or grapeseed oil or Virgin Coconut oil (heat to make liquid).
2 teaspoons sea salt - I really recommend this (can use kosher or plain salt if necessary)

Stir with that big wooden (my favorite) or plastic spoon (no metal, it kills yeast) until the very fluffy 'sponge' mixture shrinks and looks coated.

You will need anywhere from 6-10 cups of additional all purpose, unbleached flour to start forming your dough.

I slowly add in a cup of flour at a time, stirring after each addition until it starts getting HARD to stir/mix. (Conversely, use your Kitchenaid type mixer).

You will probably find that at or near 3-4 cups of additional flour, you will NOT feel like stirring this anymore!

At this point, I sprinkle about a cup of the all purpose flour on a CLEAN counter or wood cutting board. I pour the dough onto the center and slowly knead it with the flour, adding more if necessary, to form a fairly smooth ball. I do NOT spend a lot of time here, maybe 10 minutes.

Then I cut the dough into 'baseball to softball' size chunks, roll them into balls, coat in oil and put in medium size plastic baggies (to store in refrigerator) or start forming my loaves.

If storing the dough for a few days in the refrigerator, leave some room in the baggies for 'expansion', and LOOSELY tie with a twist tie, or leave 1/2 inch open if using 'zip lock' type bags. I put all that I won't use immediately into the refrigerator. You are DONE if you don’t want to bake immediately.

One of these ‘balls’ should fit perfectly in a normal ‘loaf’ bread pan. For faster baking time, I flatten the ball into a rough rectangle. I then roll it up ‘french bread loaf’ style and place on a cookie sheet. I let all loaves rest and ‘puff’ for about 30-40 minutes. Place a clean kitchen towel over them to keep drafts away and to assist in the ‘rising’.

If you have removed dough that has been in the refrigerator for a day or so, let it warm up to room temp, then shape your loaf, then let rise as above.

Preheat oven to 400 degrees F.

Bake each loaf for about 40 minutes (if using a traditional 'loaf bread pan'). I usually bake 30 minutes when I just have dough sitting on a 'baking sheet' and it is a ‘french’ or ‘peasant’ style.

You might need to bake longer or shorter. I am at 7000+ feet elevation and I've NEVER had a batch not rise well! I let the baked loaf rest for about 10 minutes, and if it’s still too moist, I adjust for following loaves. I also have put the loaf back in the oven for about 10 minutes and it ‘finishes’ fine.

Calzones made with this dough are really tasty. Flatten a dough ball into a 10 inch circle, top with cooked meat or veges and cheese and a pizza sauce of your choice. Fold in half and ‘press/pinch’ edges to seal. I cut a slit in top (about 2 inches long) to allow steam to escape, and bake at 400 deg F for about 25 min.

I will melt butter and SMALL amount of garlic salt and brush this on top of freshly baked loaves...it really adds a nice flavor.

ENJOY!!

Here is a Pictorial link to give you some ideas:

http://weblife.earthlink.net/photo/P...hcyiy::LO:a6g3
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#83 of 176 Old 08-25-2004, 07:08 PM - Thread Starter
 
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This is as 'sticky' as it gets, Suse...

Honey Marshmallows

1/3 cup water
3/4 cup honey
1 1/2 Tbls unflavored gelatin
1/4 tsp sea salt
1 tsp vanilla extract

Pour water in small saucepan and sprinkle gelatin on top. Let stand 5 minutes. Place pan over medium heat and stir only until dissolved. Do NOT BOIL!

Add in honey, salt, and vanilla extract. Transfer to a bowl and beat with an electric mixer until cool and tacky/sticky.

Sprinkle powdered sugar (Rapunzel that makes Rapadura sells powdered sugar too) onto the bottom of a 9" square pan. Pour mixture into pan and spread evenly. Let stand a few hours before cutting with a knife.

Roll squares in toasted coconut and/or melted carob or chocolate for a yummy treat.
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#84 of 176 Old 08-29-2004, 11:18 AM
 
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You are so speedy! Thanks for posting the sourdough bread recipe! I started it the other night, left it in the oven with the light on ... and dh turned the oven light off! I couldn't revive it the next day so threw it out! Am starting another batch now

Quick question - in your pizza dough recipe, you use ww flour, but I noticed in the bread recipe you switch to white flour after the sponge is made. Does it turn out ok with ww? Thanks!
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#85 of 176 Old 08-29-2004, 11:41 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Yes, in any of the 'dough' recipes you can use either all whole wheat, or all unbleached white, or any combination of the two, and even add in other flours you might like.

I use the unbleached for the 'finishing' because it 'absorbs' fast and since it's not really 'soaking' again, I feel the small amount of all purpose flour makes the dough totally hydrated and it bakes slightly better (with a smoother finish).

Whole wheat (depending on your brand) can contain less gluten and the loaves might not rise as well or can have an 'off taste'. I love the Montana Wheat with the higher than average protein content, (rises great and tastes great) but not everyone has that. Adding in a small amount of all purpose unbleached is a nice compromise and is like taking out an 'insurance' policy for you bread baking success.

HtH

The 'sponge' will rise, fall, rise fall many times during the night. If the container is covered to keep drafts out, it should be fine the next morning. It could be soft and puffy, or if is has run out of 'food' from the flour and water, it might be a smaller mass at the bottom of the container with a liquid top part (the 'sour' smelling stuff).

Just stir in your new flour and other goodies...it will then start feeding on the new flour and will do it's thing.

I keep mine in the oven with light on, as 'insurance' but have made 'starter' just sitting on the counter, as long as the kitchen isn't too cold.

GOOD LUCK! and GOOD EATS!
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#86 of 176 Old 08-31-2004, 11:01 PM
 
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Thanks for answering my questions! I made a pizza crust and 2 loaves of bread, but I don't think I let my starter get sour enough (it was about 6 hours old). It didn't taste much like sourdough. On the other hand, I've never had 100% ww sourdough! I made pbj sandwiches with the bread to take to the park today and ds liked it, so it definitely wasn't a waste!!
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#87 of 176 Old 10-25-2004, 12:56 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Here it is....The ezekiel ones are kinda near the first page or two.

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#88 of 176 Old 10-28-2004, 12:25 PM
 
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Heather,
No gluten or honey in the Eziekel bread?
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#89 of 176 Old 10-28-2004, 01:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellafinn
Heather,
No gluten or honey in the Eziekel bread?
I didn't need to add gluten and the bread has always risen wonderfully. You can always add some (a TBS or two) if you find it's not rising well, it all depends on what flours you are using. (My wheat is "Prairie Gold, Hard White Spring Wheat" by Montana Wheat and has one of the highest protein counts for a wheat and rises wonderfully).

I usually don't add in honey, especially for a 'sour soak' bread. I usually use a small amount of sugar (Rapadura or white) with the yeasts to feed them, but I even omit this if the grains are fresh ground and full of life, as this helps the yeasts grow without having to feed them a sugar.

Honey can sometimes have an 'growth inhibiting' effect on the yeast, but is fine for flavor/sweetening when used just before you bake, or with butter to eat the bread, as it starts to 'predigest' the bread for you.

I hope that made sense, I got a wiggly baby on lap chewing on my arm...so I was typing this fast.
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#90 of 176 Old 11-09-2004, 04:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Chocolate Chip Banana Bread

Here is the most requested 'sweet bread' recipe I currently have:

2 1/2 cups all purpose unbleached flour
1 1/2 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp sea salt
1 tsp ground cinnamon
3/4 cups salted butter, softened or Coconut Oil
1 1/2 cups Rapadura (whole cane sugar crystals)
2 large eggs
3 cups ripe bananas (about 6) mashed. I've used as little as 3 and it's still good
1 tsp pure vanilla extract
1 bag 'mini' chocolate chips (12 oz)

Preheat your oven to 350 deg. F.

Grease two 9x5 loaf pans. I also line them with a piece of parchment paper (not waxed) on the bottom, and then grease the top of the paper. I use Expeller Pressed Coconut oil for this. It greatly aids in removal of the bread!

In a bowl, mix your dry ingredients: Flour, soda, salt and cinnamon

In another bowl, cream butter (VCO) and sugar. It will be 'chunky'. Add in the vanilla extract and mix some more. Usually this 'melts' the sugar and the mixture become much smoother. Add in mashed bananas and eggs. Mix until a smooth batter forms.

Add in flour mixture and beat just until combined...do not overmix. Add in bag of chocolate chips, and hand stir to mix them in well.

Pour your batter into the prepared loaf pans. Bake on center rack for 65-70 minutes. A toothpick inserted in center should come out clean. Cool in the pan for 10 minutes, then turn pans on sides to allow to cool completely before removing.
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