How to Grind Flaxseeds? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 10 Old 10-23-2004, 09:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
jinkel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: The CA Desert
Posts: 829
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
When grinding flaxseeds, how *ground* should it be? Are we talking the texture of cornmeal, or something much finer?

Also…..what does everyone put their ground flaxseeds in (I know some people throw it in their yogurt w/or w/out “grapenuts”)?

Can I throw some in when making bread (in a bread machine)? If so, how much can I put in? Do I have to cut back on a different ingredient when adding flaxseeds?

Okay….think I’ve babbled enough (for one post)!
jinkel is offline  
#2 of 10 Old 10-24-2004, 01:40 PM
 
Yin Yang's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Beautifull Bellingham,WA
Posts: 2,995
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
good question! looking forward to somre replies.
can you also tell me what do you use to grind flexseeds?
Yin Yang is offline  
#3 of 10 Old 10-24-2004, 04:20 PM
 
chocomoto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: CH
Posts: 367
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I just use a coffee grinder and then store them in a small container in the freezer. I grind for 1 week at a time. I guess it's better to do it daily, but I never have that much time.

I only use them in cold foods or add them in to hot foods just before eating. I wouldn't bake the ground seeds because the fatty acids are very unstable at high temperatures.
chocomoto is offline  
#4 of 10 Old 10-25-2004, 12:27 AM
 
girlndocs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: discreet, my @ss
Posts: 4,265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
I grind in a coffee grinder too, until they're quite fine, almost floury. I store a peanut-butter-jarful at a time ground, in the freezer. I store the whole ones in the freezer too, because they grind much easier frozen, with less clumping.

Chocomoto, can you elaborate on the unstable thing? I do use my flaxmeal raw (in yogurt, mostly), but I throw it into all kinds of baked goods too, and we all like the taste. Is that actually *bad* for us? I know I'm not supposed to use flax oil for cooking or baking but for some reason I didn't connect that with the ground meal.
girlndocs is offline  
#5 of 10 Old 10-25-2004, 05:15 PM
 
chocomoto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: CH
Posts: 367
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Flax seed contains roughly 40% oil, most of this oil is alpha-linolenic acid. Grinding the seeds exposes the oil to oxidation, so the ground meal should be treated the same as flaxseed oil.
Most of the commercial baked products available contain whole flax seeds, which pass right through undigested. Grinding them makes the oils available, but it also means the oil loses its natural protection.
It's late or I would go into more detail. My eyes are crossing!

If you are interested in fats and oils in general, I would recommend the book Know Your Fats by Mary Enig.
chocomoto is offline  
#6 of 10 Old 10-25-2004, 07:49 PM
 
callmemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: midwest
Posts: 1,670
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
If only I could remember where I read this! I believe the new info on ground flax is that it can be safely heated in baked goods up to 350... Anyone else have a reference to this?!
callmemama is offline  
#7 of 10 Old 10-25-2004, 11:24 PM
 
girlndocs's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: discreet, my @ss
Posts: 4,265
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Hey, who woulda thunk it? The Canadian Flax Council to the rescue. (Thanks, jinkel!)

Quote:
Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) can withstand the temperatures of baking. One study found that heating both whole and ground flax at either 100°C or 350°C for 60 minutes had little effect on fatty acid composition or oxidation. Moreover, there was no evidence of the formation of new trans forms of ALA
Quote:
Whole flax seeds can be stored at room temperature for at least one year. Ground flax can be stored at room temperature for at least four months ... Storing whole or
ground flax in the refrigerator or freezer prolongs freshness.
Quote:
Flax oil is best used in cold applications like fruit smoothies, salad dressings and vinaigrettes. Stir-frying with flax oil can be done, provided the frying temperature is not greater than 150°C (301). [A temperature of 150°C is equivalent to 300°F ...
They suggest that 1-2 Tbsp ground flax (eta: per day) provides an "adequate intake" of ALA.
girlndocs is offline  
#8 of 10 Old 10-26-2004, 05:34 PM
 
chocomoto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: CH
Posts: 367
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks for the new info. I will check out the site. I'm still a bit skeptical about heating the oil and ground flax, but it's worth looking into.
chocomoto is offline  
#9 of 10 Old 10-26-2004, 06:00 PM
 
bionicsquirrel's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: The realm of Kansas
Posts: 926
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I bake with ground flax a lot, but I would be careful with what you choose to throw it into. Flax is used as a binder in place of eggs and it can completely change the composition of your baked goods...it also makes them a little gelatinous if too much is added.

I think it is something like 1 tspflax + 1Tbl of water = 1 egg

don't quote me on that, It might be =2 eggs. I will try to find the answer and get back to you.

*Here's the info, I was totally off...
This is from www.theppk.com a vegetarian/punk cooking website


Flax Seeds
How to use it:
1 Tablespoon flax seeds plus 3 Tablespoons water replaces one egg. Finely grind 1 tablespoon whole flaxseeds in a blender or coffee grinder, or use 2 1/2 tablespoons pre-ground flaxseeds. Transfer to a bowl and beat in 3 tablespoons of water using a whisk or fork. It will become very gooey and gelatinous, much like an egg white. In some recipes, you can leave the ground flax in the blender and add the other wet ingredients to it, thus saving you the extra step of the bowl.

When it works best:
Flax seeds have a distinct earthy granola taste. It tastes best and works very well in things like pancakes, and whole grain items, such as bran muffins and corn muffins. It is perfect for oatmeal cookies, and the texture works for cookies in general, although the taste may be too pronounced for some. Chocolate cake-y recipes have mixed results, I would recommend only using one portion flax-egg in those, because the taste can be overpowering.

Mother to one wild and crazy boy 12/29/2002.
Midwife, Homeschool Educator and Crafter.
bionicsquirrel is offline  
#10 of 10 Old 11-04-2004, 10:45 AM
 
chocomoto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: CH
Posts: 367
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I looked a bit more closely at the article on the Flax Council Web site and I see many problems with it. I posted another thread if you are interested. I would like to know what others have to say.
chocomoto is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off