Grains. Why do we need to eat them? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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Old 06-20-2005, 09:37 PM - Thread Starter
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I have been back and forth on the vegetarian/carnivor issue for well over a year. I don't know what is the heathiest way to eat. They both have their pro's and con's. I am trying to choose a lifestyle that has a good balance so I don't require any suppliments. For me it's a diet rich in beans/legumes, 1 serving of meat/day, 1 serving of goat dairy, lots of green vegetables both cooked and raw, lots of other vegetables both cooked and raw, 3-4 servings of fruit/day, nuts, some animal fats and some vegetable fats. I don't think my carb intake is low because I have way more energy than I have ever had. I have the energy to work out regularily, which had always been such a chore. My hair and nails are thicker and stronger. My moods are more stable and I am happier most of the time. My moon cycles are better than they have been in a long while.

I find this topic so interesting. I'm not convinced that colon cancer and other diseases are caused from consuming meat products. Overeating meat products, possibly. I feel carnivores concentrate less on fruits and vegetables, and omega rich fats (at least the carnivores I know). I think whole grains are relied on too much for regularity, however a good green smoothie in the morning will cure anyone of the worst constipation. You can eat whatever you want, but if you are not eliminating waste properly that in itself causes a whole host of problems. I find it interesting that people not consuming meat must take vitamin B12 suppliments. I also find it interesting that carnivores live shorter lives. I think it's all relevant to the person. There needs to be a balance and it's different for everyone.

When I am down to my goal weight I will start including a small amount of grains back. Most likely quinoa and brown rice. Perhaps, we'll see how I'm feeling.
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Old 06-20-2005, 09:38 PM
 
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The most convincing for me is the fact that people have only been eating grains for a few thousand years and they have to be cooked to be digestible. Surely that shows they are not natural?
Well, thats not true either!
Sprouted wheat has been used for many 1000's of years to make dehydrated "bread" by the essenes.
Grow your sprouts and you have wheatgrass which is also totally edible.
All grains can be soaked/sprouted/grown without cooking in order to make then digestable.
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Old 06-20-2005, 10:02 PM
 
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I'm glad somebody finally mentioned sprouting! I believe grains that are not processed properly, ei sprouting or sour leavening, can certainly be very bad for your health. Grain that is not processed like this still has it's anti-nutrients intact and will deplete the body of vital nutrients, especially minerals. Grains actually have a chelating effect in their raw, unsprouted, unprocessed state.

All healthy traditional societies who thrived on grains had ways of properly preparing them that would deactivate anti-nutrients and unlock more nutrition. For example, traditionally, Jewish people would always sour leaven their bread except during certain festivals. And bread was a major staple for them. Scottish people would always soak their oats for several days in whey before cooking them a long time to make porridge. Eastern Europeans also have the tradition of sour leavening their breads.

I personally feel very good eating a diet including sprouted grains. But as was said before, we all are unique and must find the diet most suited to our particular constitutions.
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Old 06-21-2005, 01:12 AM
 
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Originally Posted by myjo
All healthy traditional societies who thrived on grains had ways of properly preparing them that would deactivate anti-nutrients and unlock more nutrition. For example, traditionally, Jewish people would always sour leaven their bread except during certain festivals. And bread was a major staple for them. Scottish people would always soak their oats for several days in whey before cooking them a long time to make porridge. Eastern Europeans also have the tradition of sour leavening their breads.
EVERYONE who ate raised bread used a "sour leavening" or wild yeast. The process for making baker's yeast is only about 130 years old! Unleavened bread (in Jewish culture called matzah) is eaten at Passover. It's also very traditional, though, not only to Jews. a lot of people eat flat bread like tortillas or chapatis. Tortillas do support your argument, though, because corn tortillas are typically made with a specially treated cornmeal.

I should also add that even raised doughs made with commercial baking yeast can ferment quite a lot. If you punch down once, and let rise again, and then let the loaves proof, that's quite a lot of fermentation.

The problem with arguing from tradition is that 1) there are some foods which different peoples dealt with in different ways (some cultures eat lots of a food and for others it is taboo, alcoholic beverages spring to mind) and 2) we don't actually know how long some traditions for dealing with foods have been in existence. We do have archeological evidence of people using grains to make beer and then (probably later!) bread since the cultures of ancient Mesopotamia. I think sprouting grains was quite important to the early beer brewers...don't you need malt to brew beer? I also wonder whether the diets we imagine are traditional were sufficient to sustain large populations.

The Essenes didn't exist for thousands of years. Essene bread might be very traditional--I don't know anything about that--but the Essenes had their moment in SEcond TEmple Judaism under Roman rule and that's the last we saw of them! I wouldn't hold them up as paragons of health or anything, from what I know about them, either.

I don't think you need to eat any category of food if you don't want to eat it. we have such a lot of food available that you can skip something that was traditional to eat in your family and get enough of a lot of other foods to make up its lack. Certainly if you are eating lots of beans, you are getting a lot of the starch that's in grains from that. I wouldn't worry about it. The reason that that most whole foods or improved diets are based on whole grains is that most people's diets are based on refined grains, and switching anything whole for anything refined has got to be a huge improvement.

Divorced mom of one awesome boy born 2-3-2003.
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Old 06-21-2005, 01:12 AM - Thread Starter
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Ahhh, sprouting. I had forgotten about sprouting. So, can you take just plain old wheat berries and turn them into wheatgrass? Should it be a specific type of wheat berry? Can you just eat the grass or do you have to juice it, could I just put the grass in the blender with a smoothie? Sprinkle them on salads? What about spelt berries, will they grow spelt grass that is edible? I love sprouted grain bread and that's what I buy for the family. I make spelt bread for ds. I even found sprouted wheat hamburger buns. I would love to know how to make the stuff, and not have it turn into a brick.
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Old 06-21-2005, 01:19 AM
 
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There's one company I know of that actually sells sprouted grain flour. They sprout the grains, dehydrate them, then grind them into flour. You can't really tell the difference between that and other whole grain flours other than the fact that it digests easier. Here's a link if you're interested: www.creatingheaven.net/eeproducts/eesfc
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Old 06-21-2005, 01:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Jadzia
It is, but grains are lot more calorie dense than vegetables (which are more nutrient-dense).

I think that is one of the reasons Eat to Live works so well, because you fill up on such nutrient dense food that is also very low in calories.

100 calories of bread would be like 2 small slices, but 100 calories of vegetables would be a huge plate!
That makes sense. I do WW Core Plan. There is a list of foods you can eat, to "satisfaction" without measuring our counting. I've heard people compare it to volumetrics. The Plan works for me as is, so I've not done any other research or read any other books.

Things like barley, oatmeal, whole wheat pasta, brown rice, bulgur, and popcorn are on the list. I think this works because the average American isn't going to eat the same quantity of whole wheat pasta as they would white pasta. Reading the WW message boards you'd think polenta was just invented. :LOL
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Old 06-21-2005, 02:37 AM - Thread Starter
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myjo, that's a great link. Unfortunatley I can't get it here, and if I could the shipping would kill me. I wonder if I could make it myself? I have a whole bag of organic spelt berries downstairs that I was going to grind up. I wonder if I could sprout them and dry them myself? It could be worth a try.
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Old 06-21-2005, 03:26 AM
 
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Originally Posted by cjr
Ahhh, sprouting. I had forgotten about sprouting. So, can you take just plain old wheat berries and turn them into wheatgrass? Should it be a specific type of wheat berry? Can you just eat the grass or do you have to juice it, could I just put the grass in the blender with a smoothie? Sprinkle them on salads? What about spelt berries, will they grow spelt grass that is edible? I love sprouted grain bread and that's what I buy for the family. I make spelt bread for ds. I even found sprouted wheat hamburger buns. I would love to know how to make the stuff, and not have it turn into a brick.
Yep, just any type of wheat berries will do. You can use oats, rye, kamut and spelt too.
Sprout them in a jar and then spead then out in a tray on a 1 inch layer of compost/peat moss and keep watering it. It grows SO FAST.

I just chew it up and spit up the fiber when all the juice is out, I have also added to to smoothies, but I really just like the taste plain. It does wonders for your teeth and gums this way too.

How to make sprouted bread w/o it turning into a brick? I can't help you there sorry, many failed attempts here :LOL
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Old 06-21-2005, 03:34 AM - Thread Starter
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I think I'm going to try making my own sprouted flour. I have spelt berries in mason jars right now and tomorrow I will start the sprouting process. That link said they dry at 110deg, so I will start there.
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