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#61 of 145 Old 10-16-2007, 08:01 PM
 
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Our biggest local farmer's market actually goes all year round. During the winter there is a lot less produce available, and what there is tends to be greenhouse grown.

So, what's the opinion on local, organic greenhouse veggies? It is probably fairly energy intensive, but I would guess it would still come out better than transported produce. I really don't like the idea of giving up everything green for the winter - as it is there will be no fresh fruit and I'd like to keep some fresh veggies in my diet.

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#62 of 145 Old 10-16-2007, 09:41 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I would definitely agree that locally green-house grown fresh produce is better than transported. Other than home-canned, I can't think of a less impactful alternative. I mean, even with frozen, you've got the energy costs to keep them frozen, right? I'd love to have that option here.
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#63 of 145 Old 10-17-2007, 11:21 AM
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i wouldn't mind greenhouse grown foods. it makes sense to me. and, i love greenhouses. i'd love to have one myself, actually.
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#64 of 145 Old 10-17-2007, 12:04 PM
 
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I wonder what the least "impactful" way of heating a greenhouse is. I know during an Edmonton winter that they must be using some additional heating, and as our electricity is almost all coal generated, it would be nice if they are using something different. I'd love to see a geothermal greenhouse!

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#65 of 145 Old 10-17-2007, 02:26 PM
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i'm not sure what is used here, but a lot of it is actually solar. most of them are placed in open, southern spaces, and the glass traps a lot of that solar heat. the snow around can actually help the building hold heat along the ground/floor. . .

but yes, usually some sort of light/heat source is used. particularly when it is dark for long periods of time.
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#66 of 145 Old 10-17-2007, 03:16 PM
 
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i also wold like to have my own greenhouse one day. i like the looks of the yurt/greenhouses. i would also say solar and i dream of having a wind turbine or two. that's my goal. to use solar + wind only. i think it's perfect beause if the sun is not shining, you can still generate some power if the wind is blowing.
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#67 of 145 Old 10-17-2007, 04:27 PM
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I read it costs more to heat the greenhouse, than cost of gasoline. I will try to find the source.
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#68 of 145 Old 10-17-2007, 05:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Carlin View Post
I wonder what the least "impactful" way of heating a greenhouse is. I know during an Edmonton winter that they must be using some additional heating, and as our electricity is almost all coal generated, it would be nice if they are using something different. I'd love to see a geothermal greenhouse!

When we had one at my dad's house (we remodeled an old shed into a greenhouse) it was mostly solar. He had big 50 gallon plastic barrels full of water in the center, and a heavy cement floor, both of which held heat and radiated it out at night. We had to use electric heat in the dead of winter, especially if it was cloudy for a long time, but I was pretty amazed by how well just the sun and the passive solar worked in Minnesota. If we were building one now, we'd probably use a radiant floor system... but that's just my guess.

PS. I just put in my order for 55lbs of organic, local, grass-fed beef!! I'm SOOO excited to go out to the farm and pick it up!

Spending all of my money and time on this wild, wild life.
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#69 of 145 Old 10-19-2007, 12:43 PM
 
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Just finished AVM Now onto Omnivore's Dilemma.
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#70 of 145 Old 10-23-2007, 02:31 PM
 
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Find some beets with their greens (mine came from my garden). Cut the greens off the tuber, leaving a bit of stem. Roast the beets in the oven until tender.

Meanwhile, briefly saute some garlic in olive oil and then add the beet greens. Saute/steam until tender -- which takes a while because the stems are tough. While the greens are cooking, slice an apple into the pan. Cook until apple and stems are tender.

When the beets in the oven are tender, let them cool until you can peel them (don't have to peel if they are tiny) and then slice them into the cooked greens/apple.

The apple turns a gorgeous rose color and all together the beets/greens/garlic/apples are very sweet and yummy!

I've got beets in my garden that I planted at the end of August and so far I have been cooking the ones I have thinned from the bed. The plants will withstand quite a bit of cold so I plan to enjoy this recipe for a while to come.

I expect chard cooked this way with apple and garlic would be quite tasty, too, though not quite as sweet.
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#71 of 145 Old 10-23-2007, 02:46 PM
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Originally Posted by juneau View Post
Find some beets with their greens (mine came from my garden). Cut the greens off the tuber, leaving a bit of stem. Roast the beets in the oven until tender.

Meanwhile, briefly saute some garlic in olive oil and then add the beet greens. Saute/steam until tender -- which takes a while because the stems are tough. While the greens are cooking, slice an apple into the pan. Cook until apple and stems are tender.

When the beets in the oven are tender, let them cool until you can peel them (don't have to peel if they are tiny) and then slice them into the cooked greens/apple.

The apple turns a gorgeous rose color and all together the beets/greens/garlic/apples are very sweet and yummy!

I've got beets in my garden that I planted at the end of August and so far I have been cooking the ones I have thinned from the bed. The plants will withstand quite a bit of cold so I plan to enjoy this recipe for a while to come.

I expect chard cooked this way with apple and garlic would be quite tasty, too, though not quite as sweet.
That sounds SO good! Thanks for the recipe!
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#72 of 145 Old 10-24-2007, 03:13 PM
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chard and beets are relatives. so, it should taste the same. i love beet greens!
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#73 of 145 Old 10-26-2007, 04:36 PM
 
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Hi All! I've been lurking since this thread began, but since I have a few seconds without a baby at my breast I thought I'd take a second to jump in! We are slowly trying to go local. We have a local source for meat, eggs, most of our fruits and veggies (thank you CSA!!) flour and milk. Although we froze some of our summer veggies, I'm not sure what is going to happen this winter since our farmer's market isn't year round. We are just stepping into cheese making, after I was totally inspired by AVM. DH is really on board with us learning how to do as many things as possible by ourselves. If we were in a different living condition, he would totally be pushing for us to get our own animals and have a huge garden, as he grew up on a farm where they were pretty much self sufficient about everything.

So, I have a question - if you are trying to go completely local, what do you thicken/sweeten your smoothies with? We have always used bananas as a thickener and sweetner, but there aren't any bananas here, obviously! What local substitution could someone suggest? (we're in the west, btw).

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#74 of 145 Old 10-26-2007, 06:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by juneau View Post
Find some beets with their greens (mine came from my garden). Cut the greens off the tuber, leaving a bit of stem. Roast the beets in the oven until tender.

Meanwhile, briefly saute some garlic in olive oil and then add the beet greens. Saute/steam until tender -- which takes a while because the stems are tough. While the greens are cooking, slice an apple into the pan. Cook until apple and stems are tender.

When the beets in the oven are tender, let them cool until you can peel them (don't have to peel if they are tiny) and then slice them into the cooked greens/apple.

The apple turns a gorgeous rose color and all together the beets/greens/garlic/apples are very sweet and yummy!

I've got beets in my garden that I planted at the end of August and so far I have been cooking the ones I have thinned from the bed. The plants will withstand quite a bit of cold so I plan to enjoy this recipe for a while to come.

I expect chard cooked this way with apple and garlic would be quite tasty, too, though not quite as sweet.
Thanks Juneau!
I made this yesterday with a few alterations to use what I had in the fridge. I used swish chard and added some left over squash that I roasted with the beets, and some yellow bell pepper. Along with the garlic I added a touch of heat by chopping up a small orange (and very spicy) pepper we got from the farmers market. The sweetness from the apples complemented the heat from the pepper quite nicely. It got rave reviews. Served along with local, free range organic chicken breasts stuffed with feta and spices, it made for a very tasty locavores meal! Everything but the feta and spices was either from the garden or farmers market, and even the feta was only from Calgary (about 200 miles away.)

Yum, yum, yum.

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#75 of 145 Old 10-28-2007, 01:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Our farmstand closes on Tuesday. I'm already feeling bummed out. I bought a bunch of canned salsa, but that's not going to get us through the winter.

On the plus side, I had a great conversation with a manager at Albertson's yesterday; I had noticed that there were apples from NEW ZEALAND for sale, which I just cannot get my brain around when we live 300 miles from all the Washington apple orchards. I mentioned to her that I was concerned about the environmental cost, and she totally agreed. She did say that Corporate determines what they get, and that if I would be willing to write them a letter expressing my concerns (particularly about how I'm willing to pay extra for more local stuff) that she'd really appreciate it and support it as best she can. So I need to get that done in the next couple days before I lose momentum. Seriously--it is harvest time here in the northern hemisphere. How on earth could apples from New Zealand be fresh right now? Could they possibly have been in storage since the harvest in the southern hemisphere like 6 months ago? Ewww!
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#76 of 145 Old 10-28-2007, 05:33 PM
 
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Good for you for asking those questions! As we come into winter and I'm having to work so hard to make sure we eat good, whole foods for dinner every night, I feel my committment flagging a bit. Planning very completely is the only way we manage to eat well and I am struggling with that. Plus the FM is closing, we've just moved and I miss miss miss our two CSA's (the one here I don't like very much), and our own garden isn't so great this year. Plus I didn't put up as much as I wanted to. The stuff that I did put up we've eaten a lot of already (blueberries and black raspberries YUM!). I'm just struggling. No one else that I know IRL is concerned about this stuff. I need to reread AVM and get remotivated. I found a local dairy but can't seem to find the money for the deposits to get it. It's started to seem extreme. I am passionate about this stuff usually; I don't know why I'm struggling now. Oh well, enough about that. I'll get reinspired. It's too important not to.

As I side note, I just have to share this. You ladies are the only ones that could possibly understand how excited I am - everyone else I know (like my parents) just say, "Who's that?" But I went to a wedding yesterday for some really wonderful people who we've come to love and Wendell and Tanya Berry were there and we sat with them at the reception and I COULDN'T BELIEVE IT! He's like my hero. I was totally cool though because I'm sure he gets fawned over all the time. But it was wonderful. I was sitting there with his wife talking about where she grocery shops and it was so neat. It was a strange mix of meeting my hero and meeting these people in my new community who I want to be just normal with. But there was no one to share it with who would appreciate how excited I was, but I thought you all might!

Happy locavoring!
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#77 of 145 Old 10-29-2007, 03:03 PM
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when the apples were in season in NZ, i was there. they have quite good apples, and it's amazing how tense they are talking about local food, considering that most of their income comes from exporting apples! (among other things)

so, talking about eating locally was something that they're into--because local foods are less expensive than imports (and food is expensive there in general)--but they did not want american's eating local (american) apples.

and, considering that the northern part of the southern island and the north island are pretty temperate/warm--they can actually stay in season throughout their winter, and they also have some very hardy breeds of apples that they grow there.

anyway, itneresting to birng it up.
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#78 of 145 Old 10-29-2007, 04:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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and, considering that the northern part of the southern island and the north island are pretty temperate/warm--they can actually stay in season throughout their winter, and they also have some very hardy breeds of apples that they grow there.
Ahh, that was the part I was unsure of. I'm so glad you were able to clear that up for me!

Imagine living somewhere you could grow your produce year-round!
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#79 of 145 Old 10-29-2007, 05:13 PM
 
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wow what a cool thread!!
We had bought a half dozen copies of Omnivore's Delemma and handed it out everyone we know - awesome book!!
We run a farm in Vermont that raises lamb - 100% grass fed, and pastured poultry and a little bit of grass-fed beef too. We also have our own chickens and a small garden. We have taken to bartering with other local farmers for veggies, honey, flour, beans, maply syrup and other things. Now that I'm pregnant, my husband s even more adamant that we eat out of our own stores, so to speak, so we are canning, freezing as much as we can. He is really funny, likes to fill me up with healthy grass-fed fats and all kinds of wholesome stuff.
I have just started AVM, husband read it in 2 days and can't wait for me to get more into it.
So good to see other's doing what we are!
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#80 of 145 Old 10-29-2007, 07:12 PM
 
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Hey locovore mamas! I just finished Plenty: One Man, One Woman, and a Raucous Year of Eating Locally, and it was pretty good! I liked Animal, Vegetable Miracle more, both because it was more informative in general and because it was just, well, better written. But Plenty is interesting in its own right, and it's a quick read. The authors tackle some crazy stuff, like making their own sea salt, and you really feel their pain while they scour their area looking for wheat of any kind. They write quite a bit about how the experiment affected their relationship, too, which I frankly could have lived without, but that's just me. Personally, I would have liked to have seen more recipes or accounts of what they ate on a day-to-day basis, but I'm weird that way: a food voyeur.

Chessa , mama to Silas T (6/06) , wife to Chad . Welcome August Emerson! 2/8/10
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#81 of 145 Old 10-29-2007, 10:43 PM
 
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hello locavore mamas!

i'm so glad to have found this thread. I love love love eating locally and am lucky to live in a town that has a wonderful all year round farmers market but am unlucky to be living in a rather short growing season...which means soon no more fresh greens. however, i've frozen alot of greens for the winter (i actually bought a small energy effiecient freezer just for this reason)

although I'm very committed to eating locally, some of my housemates are not, and they often buy mangos, bananas and other tropical fruits. very tempting!

one thing I'm trying to figure out right now is how to get more vitamin c into my diet with local food. i used to drink/eat alot of oranges in the winter, but i'm trying to avoid that now. anyone know of any high vitamin c foods? i've heard that some people drink cedar tea, but i'm not sure how to prepare that.

anyway, this thread has re-inpsired me!
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#82 of 145 Old 10-31-2007, 11:32 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I know pine needles and rose hips both have scads of Vitamin C. Maybe you could find some of those and make tea?

I hear you on the orange juice. That's a hard one for me, since oranges obviously don't grow anywhere near Idaho. DD drinks a lot of it, and so the concession I have made is to buy it in concentrate, whenever possible. Then at least we're not paying to ship all the water, if you know what I mean. It's not the best solution, but perhaps it is more environmentally friendly to do it that way.
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#83 of 145 Old 11-02-2007, 02:21 PM
 
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I am more and more interested in eating locally. Since quality organic is often difficult to find, I think I should shift my focus to local products.

I order meat from one butcher, who has a local farm, makes his own sausages, stuff like that. I sometimes want lamb, however, and the best lamb comes from NZ...so I admit to getting that sometimes.

I shop various veggie stalls in my neighborhood and want to limit my produce buying at the regional store.
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#84 of 145 Old 11-04-2007, 01:30 AM
 
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Hi! My family and I have been trying to eat locally as much as possible for about a year now. We go to farmer's market weekly, and also the local natural food store for supplies. Luckily our farmers market is year round. I feel so much better eating locally, about my impact on the world, and about the great food that I find.
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#85 of 145 Old 11-08-2007, 09:18 PM
 
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Okay, someone, somewhere posted a link to a site where you could look up your state and see when things were in season. I've looked and I can't seem to find it. Does anyone know what is was???? Please???

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#86 of 145 Old 11-13-2007, 05:07 PM
 
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I am pleased to have a place to interact about this. We've been trying to eat more locally, though not in the county like AVM. Does anyone rent and have chickens? I'd *LOVE* to keep some but buying a house seems a long way off.
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#87 of 145 Old 11-13-2007, 05:10 PM
 
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I forgot to subscribe.
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#88 of 145 Old 11-13-2007, 05:34 PM
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i think you only need a yard to keep them in. i don't think it's necessarily a rental problem.
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#89 of 145 Old 11-24-2007, 09:00 PM
 
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Hey locavore mamas, just wondering how people did with eating locally over Thanksgiving? We did pretty well on our sides (our main dish was a homemade seitan "turkey" and although I could have gone to a lot of effort to make homemade seitan with like 2 lbs of flour, I skipped that step and used boxed vital wheat gluten - but it was so good!). But we did have local brussels sprouts, mashed potatoes, cornbread stuffing, pumpkin pie (made with a *real* pumpkin and half and half!) and a buttermilk blueberry pie, with frozen local blueberries and local buttermilk. YUM!

Chessa , mama to Silas T (6/06) , wife to Chad . Welcome August Emerson! 2/8/10
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#90 of 145 Old 11-25-2007, 02:17 PM
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i used local dairy products, the turkey was from within 100 miles, the parsnips were local, the bread was local, the salads were local, but the soup and green beans and dessert stuff were not.
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