If you don't use iodized salt. . . - Mothering Forums

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Old 02-12-2008, 02:35 AM - Thread Starter
 
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what do you do to get iodine in your diet. I'd like to know the product you buy (food or supplement) and how you take/eat it. TIA!
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Old 02-12-2008, 03:00 AM
 
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what do you do to get iodine in your diet. I'd like to know the product you buy (food or supplement) and how you take/eat it. TIA!
I'm allergic to the iodine in iodized salt- so we never buy it. BUT we live right by the gulf coast and eat tons of seafood so I never worry about iodine.

-Angela
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Old 02-12-2008, 01:26 PM
 
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I just don't worry about it. Its not like we need a lot of the stuff, so I figure we're probably getting plenty of it in our regular foods. We survived for millions of years without iodized salt/iodine supplements just peachy fine afterall!
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Old 02-12-2008, 01:28 PM
 
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Seaweed? Like in sushi or soups.
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Old 02-12-2008, 01:31 PM
 
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I eat seaweed salad.
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Old 02-12-2008, 02:04 PM
 
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I eat kombu seaweed, dried, as a crunchy snack. But it's definitely an aquired taste.

My kids don't eat seaweed plain, but they do take vitamins and two of them eat fish a few times a week. Plus the salt I use contains trace minerals- not as much iodine as synthetically iodized salt, but some iodine plus other minerals in natural proportions.

Ruth, single mommy to Leah, 19, Hannah, 18 (commuting to college), and Jack, 13(homeschooled)
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Old 02-12-2008, 03:09 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks everyone. We don't give dd seafood at all because of her allergies, so I wonder if she's getting enough iodine.

Ruthla, what kind of salt do you use?
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Old 02-12-2008, 09:50 PM
 
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Usually RealSalt, but I've bought other natural unprocessed salts if they weren't too expensive and they were available at the store.

Ruth, single mommy to Leah, 19, Hannah, 18 (commuting to college), and Jack, 13(homeschooled)
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Old 02-12-2008, 10:00 PM
 
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I get iodine from seaweed, and also in my multivitamin.
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Old 02-12-2008, 10:09 PM
 
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We use sea salt that does not have iodine added. Does it contain natural iodine? How could I find out? We don't eat seafood and I have wondered if we're missing it in our diets, though I assume that when eating out (usually breakfast) or eating at friends, the food is salted and the salt has iodine, so perhaps that is enough?
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Old 02-12-2008, 10:52 PM
 
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We haven't used iodized salt for about 10 years. Everybody is just fine. I myself eat fish or shellfish 3 times a week, but nobody else in my family does. I think they get enough iodine from just regular food.

Mom to 2 beautiful autistic boys (12 & 11)  
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Old 02-13-2008, 01:26 AM
 
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I use a liquid iodine that I got off the net... can't find my link right now. I'm allergic to shellfish and this one is made from kelp. I have really noticed a difference in my body and mind since I've started using it.

I am overweight and I feel that my weightloss is much easier than ever before.
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Old 02-13-2008, 08:42 AM
 
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We eat a ton of seaweed. We also have iodine in our vitamins (from kelp). I use Celtic Sea Salt which has natural iodine in it, along with many other trace minerals. It can be a little pricey, but if you grind it yourself it isn't that bad. I get it from here.

Barbara:  an always learning SAHM of Ilana (11) and Aiden (8) living in Belgium with my amazing husband.

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Old 02-13-2008, 03:20 PM
 
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I was just wondering the same thing yesterday!! I did a few searches. To get iodine from food, eat kelp, yogurt, eggs, strawberries, and mozarella cheese. I also found this information about iodized table salt vs. sea salt at http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/...isease/115556:

"Refined salt is a chemical composed of 99.9 percent sodium chloride, and 0.1 percent additives. In the last half century, potassium iodide has been regularly added to refined salt to help prevent iodine deficiency. Aluminum and sugar are also added to help stabilize the product's composition and prevent caking. The 80 minerals found in sea salt, with proven health benefits, aren't found in refined salt.

Iodine deficiency is rarely seen today. At one time, glacial runoff caused deficiencies of iodine in glacial areas such as the Alps. The use of sea salt is the best way to prevent iodine deficiencies. However, refined salt, a chemical as clean as heroin or white sugar, is inexpensive to manufacture yet profitable for those who produce it. Refined salt is used as a preservative for processed, pre-packaged foods, adding months to the products shelf life.

Early on, however, scientists recognized that this unnatural form of iodine present in refined salt had the potential to cause problems. The body cannot handle refined salt in the same manner it handles sea salt. The kidneys have trouble metabolizing it and blood pressure rises. The thyroid gland is confused by its appearance and consequently forms thyroid antibodies. On top of this, the amount of unnatural iodine consumed in the United States far exceeds the minimum daily requirement.

The body needs 75-150 mcg iodine daily for optimal thyroid hormone production. The typical American diet provides 300-700 mcg daily, and diets rich in processed and fast foods contain an excess of 1,000 mcg. Writing in The Nature Doctor in the early 1950's, the Swiss physician Dr. H.C.A. Vogel reported that amounts of iodine greater than 150 mcg caused palpitations and triggered Graves' disease in people genetically predisposed to autoimmune thyroid disease. This has been confirmed by the German Commission E, the world authority on herbal medicine in its warnings to avoid kelp, because of its high iodine content."

Kathy

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Old 02-13-2008, 03:33 PM
 
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Thanks for the link, Kathy! I was just wondering the same thing yesterday. Good information.
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Old 02-13-2008, 08:25 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks, Kathy! I appreciate the information
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Old 02-13-2008, 08:39 PM
 
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Very interesting, Kathy!

Just a couple months ago, I think, there was a bit on NPR about how doctors here are starting to see an increase in cases of iodine deficiency in the US. They linked the trend to the increased proportion of processed foods in our diets, because processed foods generally contain non-iodized salt, while at home families have tended to use iodized. That seems to be the opposite of what the story you linked to is saying about processed foods?!?
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Old 02-13-2008, 08:57 PM
 
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Iodine is a halogen. It is pushed out of its processes by other halogens that are obiquitious in the modern life. For example Bromide (fire retardant on clothing or furniture), Fluoride (toothpaste, municipal water supply,medications), and Chorine (municipal water supply).

You might get the RDA in your diet (likely not since the soil in may places is totally deficient in it now), but that doesn't mean your body is USING IT. It is being out competed by its companion halogens.

Unless you eat lots of sea veggies, you probably are not getting as much as your body needs. If you living in the interior of the continent, you are almost surely not getting enough. Plus the RDA is RIDICULOUSLY low. Particularly if your ancestors lived near the ocean (almost everyone). People in Japan on a trad diet daily would get at least 15x that amount.

If you consume to much you might pee it out. That's about it. And that would be GOOD for your urinary tract.

I use dulse extracted iodine or Lugol's.
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Old 02-13-2008, 11:47 PM
 
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we use iodoral.

Actually iodine does NOT compete with halogens. They only take up receptor sites in the ABSENCE of iodine.
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Old 02-13-2008, 11:50 PM
 
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Very interesting, Kathy!

Just a couple months ago, I think, there was a bit on NPR about how doctors here are starting to see an increase in cases of iodine deficiency in the US. They linked the trend to the increased proportion of processed foods in our diets, because processed foods generally contain non-iodized salt, while at home families have tended to use iodized. That seems to be the opposite of what the story you linked to is saying about processed foods?!?
Processed foods (bread and the like) used to use iodine as a leavening agent. They now use bromide. It will bind to the same receptors as iodine and in the absence of iodine most people become bromide toxic. It doesn't have all that much to do with salt, but it has quite a bit to do with processed food.
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Old 02-13-2008, 11:52 PM
 
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I was just wondering the same thing yesterday!! I did a few searches. To get iodine from food, eat kelp, yogurt, eggs, strawberries, and mozarella cheese. I also found this information about iodized table salt vs. sea salt at http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/...isease/115556:

"Refined salt is a chemical composed of 99.9 percent sodium chloride, and 0.1 percent additives. In the last half century, potassium iodide has been regularly added to refined salt to help prevent iodine deficiency. Aluminum and sugar are also added to help stabilize the product's composition and prevent caking. The 80 minerals found in sea salt, with proven health benefits, aren't found in refined salt.

Iodine deficiency is rarely seen today. At one time, glacial runoff caused deficiencies of iodine in glacial areas such as the Alps. The use of sea salt is the best way to prevent iodine deficiencies. However, refined salt, a chemical as clean as heroin or white sugar, is inexpensive to manufacture yet profitable for those who produce it. Refined salt is used as a preservative for processed, pre-packaged foods, adding months to the products shelf life.

Early on, however, scientists recognized that this unnatural form of iodine present in refined salt had the potential to cause problems. The body cannot handle refined salt in the same manner it handles sea salt. The kidneys have trouble metabolizing it and blood pressure rises. The thyroid gland is confused by its appearance and consequently forms thyroid antibodies. On top of this, the amount of unnatural iodine consumed in the United States far exceeds the minimum daily requirement.

The body needs 75-150 mcg iodine daily for optimal thyroid hormone production. The typical American diet provides 300-700 mcg daily, and diets rich in processed and fast foods contain an excess of 1,000 mcg.
Writing in The Nature Doctor in the early 1950's, the Swiss physician Dr. H.C.A. Vogel reported that amounts of iodine greater than 150 mcg caused palpitations and triggered Graves' disease in people genetically predisposed to autoimmune thyroid disease. This has been confirmed by the German Commission E, the world authority on herbal medicine in its warnings to avoid kelp, because of its high iodine content."

Kathy
This information is dangerously inaccurate.
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Old 02-14-2008, 12:20 AM - Thread Starter
 
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This information is dangerously inaccurate.
FF, can you elaborate on that? I would like to learn more about this.
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Old 02-14-2008, 02:14 AM
 
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http://www.optimox.com/pics/Iodine/opt_Research_I.shtml

http://drshevin.com/patient_educatio...deficiency.php

This is start. There is alot more out there. I pay more attention to the folks looking to solve the problems than the ones looking to cover them up.
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Old 02-14-2008, 10:19 AM
 
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I thought it was a pretty benign source. The first one I found on my search was saltsensibility.com and that a salt seller, so I figured it wouldn't be too accurate. The sources you sent were very interesting. Obscure to find though. Sometimes it's hard to tell what is accurate or not with so much conflicting information out there.
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Old 02-14-2008, 12:17 PM
 
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I 100% agree which is why forums like this are so valuable.

There are certain instances in which the research is newly proving conventional wisdom wrong and it is VERY important, very obscure, but totally valid. It really sticks in my craw that it's not widely available when a large part of the medical community knows about it and just doesn't care. The stance of allopathy is still that there are no deficiencies until pathological stages are reached. Clearly that isn't true. There is a spectrum and you are deficient long before you develop (in this specific instance) thyroid cancer or breast cancer. I don't know why they can't seem to wrap their heads around that fact.

I think the second link says it all. If iodine deficiency is that uncommon, why did all of the people he was testing come up deficient? IF it's so uncommon why is thyroid disease so rampant?

I think it is dangerous to dupe the public in any sense. Then well meaning people who are researching will come across several links and be under the false belief that that simply cannot be their problem and the downward spiral continues.

Do you know how many people who are terrified of breast cancer and testing for the gene, debating whether or not to get a mastectomy based on those results alone would benefit from this knowledge? To me, the misinformation *is* dangerous. If a simple thing could correct a huge problem we all deserve to be hearing about it. But what we hear instead are ads paid for by big pharma. God forbid synthroid sales go down becuase we learn to to test our levels and supplement with iodine...
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