foods to make kids grow taller? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 10 Old 05-21-2008, 02:04 AM - Thread Starter
 
summerleaf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 178
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I was curious if there are foods that could make kids grow taller? My 3 year old is below the 25% percentile for height but when she was a baby she was 75% or more. She still nurses, and eats lots of different foods, but I wondered if there are any foods know to increase height (or stunt growth?)
summerleaf is offline  
#2 of 10 Old 05-21-2008, 12:12 PM
 
tanyalynn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: TX, but anticipating one more move
Posts: 11,508
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Have you asked around in the family to see what the typical growth pattern is like? Some families grow tall early and then stop growing relatively early in adolescence, and some grow later (so they're shorter through most of childhood) but then keep growing until they're later in their teens. It's different than how tall they eventually end up. There's an article on www.drgreene.com about it. There's a lot less social/self pressure when the family grows tall early, like my husband's family and mine, so I can see if it were opposite, it would be troublesome.
tanyalynn is offline  
#3 of 10 Old 05-21-2008, 04:24 PM
 
Samjm's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: northeast of Boulder Colorado
Posts: 1,767
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
To my knowledge, height is genetically determined and not influenced by diet - other than in extreme circumstances.

I found this at http://www.kidsgrowth.com/hc/height.cfm

Quote:
A child's adult height is influenced by a number of factors, including genetics, sex, and overall health and nutrition. Genetics and the child's gender account for 70% of what goes into deciding how tall a child will be. The other 30% comes from environmental factors, such as nutrition, exercise, and any underlying health problems
.

You can get a reasonably accurate prediction of their adult height by adding the bio parents heights together, dividing by 2, then adding 3 inches for a boy and subtracting 3 inches for a girl.
Samjm is offline  
#4 of 10 Old 05-21-2008, 07:16 PM - Thread Starter
 
summerleaf's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Burnaby, BC
Posts: 178
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samjm View Post
You can get a reasonably accurate prediction of their adult height by adding the bio parents heights together, dividing by 2, then adding 3 inches for a boy and subtracting 3 inches for a girl.
Well since I am 5' 6" and my husband is 5' 10" I guess that would make my daughter come out to 5' 5". My husband was adopted so we don't know about growth patterns in his family, but I'll have to ask about mine.

There are some interesting growth height predictors here:
http://pediatrics.about.com/cs/growt...t_predictr.htm
The "Yet Another Height Predictor" predicts my daughter will be 5' 2 1/2" (that's based on her being 36" at 3 yrs)

The Two Years Times Two method predicts she will 5' 3.6" (that's based on her being 33" at 2 yrs.

What concerns me is that her growth rate seems to have slowed in the past year. But the Dr. didn't seem concerned, so I guess we'll wait and see.
summerleaf is offline  
#5 of 10 Old 05-21-2008, 08:35 PM
 
tanyalynn's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: TX, but anticipating one more move
Posts: 11,508
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
What concerns me is that her growth rate seems to have slowed in the past year. But the Dr. didn't seem concerned, so I guess we'll wait and see.
So I totally didn't answer your question at first, and I apologize for that. And if you see other signs that things just don't seem right, you should keep digging and asking questions. But I wanted to throw out the idea of different growth trajectories (for lack of a better term, not sure how to say it) in case that could be what's going on. If other stuff seems fine, then I think it's okay to just keep feeding her regular healthy foods. Maybe ask your husband when he stopped growing (assuming he wasn't in an odd situation where he didn't get enough to eat, of course). For my husband and me, it was pretty early--I think my husband was full height (6'1'') at about 14 or 15, and I was full height (5'5'') around 13 or 14, so I'm assuming our kids will be somewhere on the medium to tall range, but they'll get there earlier than most others. HTH.
tanyalynn is offline  
#6 of 10 Old 05-21-2008, 08:37 PM
 
tinuviel_k's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 3,370
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Samjm View Post
You can get a reasonably accurate prediction of their adult height by adding the bio parents heights together, dividing by 2, then adding 3 inches for a boy and subtracting 3 inches for a girl.
That's an interesting calculatorm but I'm not sure how accurate that really is. It didn't really work for my family, anyway. My mom is 5' 4" and my dad is 6' 1".
The girls in the family according to the calculation would be 5 ft 5.5 inches, and the boys would be 5 feet' 11.5 inches.

Me: 5'4
Sis One: 5'8
Sis Two: 5'4
Brother: 5'7

Still, you can at least get an idea based on parental height. Obviously in my family we had a shorter mom and a taller dad. But in my mom's family some of her siblings are quite tall and some are mom's height. Likewise, my dad's sister is my same height, 5'4, while he is tall. So we ended up with a couple short girls, a really tall girl, and a short son. A big range of heights, but none of it was surprising as it was all within our genetic range. Had one of us girls been 5' or 5'2 it would have been unusual, or if my brother had been 6'5 or something like that.
So how tall are you, and how tall is your husband? How about your parents and his? Siblings? Unless everyone in your family is tall I wouldn't worry about the drop off necessarily.


Beyond providing good nutrition for your child I don't believe there are any foods that can make them taller.

Giving them a very poor, nutrient-devoid diet could reasonably stunt a child's growth and development, though. That is not much of a problem for most of us, thankfully. (though it is for far too many people in the world).

Also, if a child had a strong allergy or intolerance, or an autoimmune disease like Chrons or Celiac it could prevent them from absorbing the nutrients they need, and therefor inhibit growth.
tinuviel_k is offline  
#7 of 10 Old 05-21-2008, 09:02 PM
 
Mirzam's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Outside the hive mind
Posts: 7,305
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
A nutrient dense diet is likely to assist a child to grow to its full potential, so feed her well! I have nothing to base this on, but I wonder if raw milk is good for height, given that the Maasai tribe grew very tall on a diet largely based of raw milk, blood and meat. If you want to try something "off the wall" but completely safe, then Redwood flower essence can promote height growth in children.

Rainbow.giftstillheart.gifsmile.gif

 

"If you find from your own experience that something is a fact and it contradicts what some authority has written down, then you must abandon the authority and base your reasoning on your own findings"~ Leonardo da Vinci

Mirzam is online now  
#8 of 10 Old 05-21-2008, 10:46 PM
 
BusyBeeMom's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 1,683
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Protein is critical for height, so a protein-deficient, or low-protein diet may limit growth. As an example, people who grew up in countries with generally lower-protein diets (like rice & beans based diets) tend to be on the short side, by U.S. norms. However, their children, if born & raised here on a protein-rich U.S. diet, are substantially taller than them, on average. Not to say the American diet is great.

Of course, adding loads of additional protein won't make a child grow infinitely tall.

Another thing - growth hormone is at its highest levels during periods of fasting, like overnight when a child is not eating. If your DC never goes more than a few hours w/o eating or drinking something caloric (nursing or snacking through the night, for instance), it could be subtly inhibiting growth hormone, though I'm not sure how much of an effect this would actually have on growth in practice.
BusyBeeMom is offline  
#9 of 10 Old 05-21-2008, 11:07 PM
 
MacroMama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Boston
Posts: 654
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Does your daughter suffer from a lot of ear infections? My husband did around that age and didn't grow for 2-3 years.

Although I wouldn't worry about it either, I do know that growth is related to kidney energy (macrobiotically). Foods that deplete kidney energy, such as sugar, fruit, tropical fruits and veggies (bananas, tomatoes, eggplant, etc), chocolate, fruit juices, and more, could effect growth somewhat. So, you could try decreasing all those foods and see how if that helps.

But once again, if she's doing well otherwise, I wouldn't worry about it.

Good luck!
MacroMama is offline  
#10 of 10 Old 12-27-2013, 12:46 AM
 
mikewjliu's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2013
Posts: 1
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

How to make your children grow tall? When my was 13 years old last September, my son was about 6 feet tall (181 centimeters), as tall as Yao Ming at the age of 13. I designed a program called SEED to grow my son this tall. I called this program SEED because I wish my son will become a NBA seed. Any parent who wants to grow his or her children can be inspired by my SEED program. The components of SEED are as follows: S: Sleep adequately. E: Eat properly. E: Exercise in the sun. D: Drink milk. S: Sleep At each age, children sleep different number of hours, Wikipedia listed the hours required by age as follows (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep): Age and condition Sleep Needs Newborns(0-2 months): 12 to 18 hours Infants(3-11 months): 14 to 15 hours Toddlers(1-3 years): 12 to 14 hours Preschoolers(3-5 years): 11 to 13 hours School-age children(5-10 years): 10 to 11 hours Adolescents(10-17 years): 8.5 to 9.25 hours Adults, including elderly: 7 to 9 hours. Eat and Exercise must be balanced, otherwise children will become overweighted or underweighted. Scientifically speaking, calcium and vitamin D provided by Milk and Exercise in the sun is the reason why children grow tall. The SEED program did work. Try it out! As parents we're not as tall as Yao Ming's parents, but my son tie Yao Ming in Height at the age of 13. Any better formula to grow your children tall? Please let me know by dropping a comment or sending me an email at mikewjliu@gmail.com.

mikewjliu is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off