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#91 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 09:20 AM
 
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We weren't rich, but we still only got snack cakes on the rare occassion (think school field trip). I was born in the mid-70s.

My mom cooked almost every day. We took our lunches to school. Not much different than how I do with my kids. Except my mom cooked healthier, on the whole. Lots of liver, fried chicken, etc. meals. I tend toward too much pasta, I think.

We ate a lot more candy, tho. I would never let my kids eat as much candy as my mom let me eat. I loooooved candy/gum cigarettes. "Smoked" them incessantly.

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#92 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 09:37 AM
 
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The idea that junk food didn't really become popular until the 80's seems strange to me. I was born in 1962, DP was born in 1955, and we've often commented on how strangely willing to buy processed, non-nutritious crap all the parents were when we were kids. My mom bought whatever sugary breakfast cereals we wanted. (My favorite was Life, though.) My usual elementary school lunch was a fluffernutter, often with a Ding-Dong or Ho-Ho for dessert. I drank Hi-C grape drink with every meal. My siblings were fond of Tang and Kool-Aid. We ate white bread, pre-wrapped American cheese slices, margarine, Spaghetti-O's, etc.

My family lived in the suburbs of big cities, and we ate at fast food places pretty often. But DP grew up in small-town upstate NY, and the first McDonald's didn't come to his area until he was in high school, so he almost never had fast food as a kid. I absolutely loved Kentucky Fried Chicken. Man, it used to be SO GOOD! I'd love to know whether it's changed a lot over the years, or whether it's just my tastes that have changed.
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#93 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 09:52 AM
 
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I absolutely loved Kentucky Fried Chicken. Man, it used to be SO GOOD! I'd love to know whether it's changed a lot over the years, or whether it's just my tastes that have changed.
It's not your tastes. It just doesn't taste as good as it used to. I, too, was a KFC chick. Didn't much care for McD or BK.

I liked Arby's and Hardee's, tho. When I was growing up, fast food was something you ate either on Sundays (b/c it was a day of rest) or when on the road traveling. For us kids, anyway. My dad was at Hardee's daily (for coffee, at least). I fondly remember the Smurfs and Care Bears glasses they had.

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#94 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 10:03 AM
 
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Didn't the current nutrition content labels on food become standardized about 15 years ago? I remember when they adopted the current format, but I don't remember what they were like before that....what information was provided and in what format. I don't think my mom ever looked at them, but I don't remember if the lablels were useful back then.
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#95 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 11:39 AM
 
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Today we start our vacation week. I just got back from the grocery store, where I spent $96 on junk, aka vacation food from my childhood. Don't flame me. I know this isn't exactly healthy eating, but it's probably still better than eating out (which I'm also hoping to do a lot of .)
-potato sticks in the single serve can
-cheezits
-the 'real' animal crackers in a box w/ a string ($1.50 per box!!!)
-single-serve sugar cereal
-can of cinnamon buns
-2 boxes of muffin mix
-hot dogs
-family size bag of potato chips
-bacon
-a pint of Ben & Jerry's
-ice cream cones
-pretzels
:
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#96 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 11:43 AM
 
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Didn't the current nutrition content labels on food become standardized about 15 years ago? I remember when they adopted the current format, but I don't remember what they were like before that....what information was provided and in what format. I don't think my mom ever looked at them, but I don't remember if the lablels were useful back then.
There was a list of ingredients, but that was it. It was really hard being diabetic and having to take a wild guess about what was in stuff.
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#97 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 12:32 PM
 
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there usually was a list of ingredients, the calories on some things, and the cereal boxes had the vitamins they had in them listed.

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I miss pudding pops. The old school pudding pops. The new ones don't taste the same.
Yes! I remember when the taste changed, and we stopped buying them. I think maybe there was crack in the old ones though because I could NOT stop eating them.

I was born in 67 and I remember eating just as much junk as is available now honestly. It wasn't always as brightly colored or cleverly packaged, or insistantly advertised, but it was the same junk. Pop tarts for breakfast, devil dogs (yes I remember them) for snacks, sugary cereal. My mom put her foot down about marshmallow cereals, but my grandmother would buy them for us when we stayed with her. I think that is funny that was the line my mom wouldn't cross because basically everything we ate was full of sugar. We didn't get soda pop at the house but we drank it with every meal when we were out and drank juice for every meal at home.

We weren't poor but were really tight for a while when I was a kid when we moved and our other house didn't sell for over a year. We ate lots of franks and beans and boxed mac and cheese but we were still drinking expensive juice at every meal. I think my mom thought that was nutrition. I didn't know if I liked vegetables or not until I got to college, my parents never cooked veggies except occasional canned peas and they had iceberg lettuce salads. The only place I ever had veggies otherwise was at chinese restaurants. Even when I started shopping and cooking for myself in my teens I really had no idea what to buy or how to cook them. (really, I didn't even know you could just steam broccoli) . My mom used to cook pineapple chicken, meat balls, chef boyardee pizza in a box was a real treat, Kraft mac and cheese...
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#98 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 12:50 PM
 
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However, I think HFCS didn't start getting into everything until the 1980s, right? So most of the junk before that was actual sugar. I don't know if that makes a difference or not as far as eating that much junk then as compared to now. And now there is HFCS in pretty much everything, not just snacks, so you get a lot more now, as compared to then, I would think?
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#99 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 02:29 PM
 
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My parents were way crunchy for the time (help start the food coop where we lived, soda and most candy and junky food was forbidden to cross the threshhold) and in fact my father was a bit extreme about it and still is--
My mother was like your parents, into the hippy/macrobiotic movement of the time. She was VERY extreme about food. I grew up in the 1970s and ‘80s, and I was fed way too many whole grains to the exclusion of almost everything else. We were practically raised vegan in that very few animal products were in our diet. Meals were grains, beans, vegetables, fruits, and nuts, but mostly grains.

Breakfast was oatmeal, whole wheat berries, or some other whole grain hot cereal. Lunch was peanut butter on homemade heavy-duty ww bread. Supper was brown rice with a side of tofu. An occasional treat was OJ with nutritional yeast stirred into it, homemade carob cookies, popcorn with blackstrap molasses on it, watered-down apple juice, or a glass of soy milk.

It sucked. We weren’t fed nearly enough fat or protein. We craved butter, cheese, and meats.

Anything sugary or sweet or packaged was completely forbidden. I was so envious of the other kids at school who had fluffernutter sandwhiches on that fluffy white bread for lunch. I wanted Kool-Aid so badly. When I went to friends’ houses, I was overjoyed to partake of Tang, Fruity Pebbles, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, Rice Krispy treats, hot cocoa with marshmallows, soda, candy, Cheez-its, chips, cheese-filled Combos, Doritos, Twinkies, Hershey's Kisses, Snickers, Double Stuff Oreos, pizza, and hot dogs. I had this friend at school who took pity on me and shared her Kudos bars and Capri Suns with me.

To her credit, my mom meant well, and she always cooked everything from scratch. But I’ll never understand why the health food nuts of that era thought that whole grains were some sort of panacea.
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#100 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 02:35 PM
 
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I'm 35, and remember having lunch box envy as early as Kindergarten. I was caught by my dad (a teacher at my elementary school) throwing my lunch away so I could get a 2nd hot lunch that month. Oh the wrath!

My mom made everything from scratch, aside from the boxes of Triscuits, Wheat Thins, Shredded Wheat Cereal and our sugariest cereal we were permitted was Life. We always had to have fruit, mainly bananas, on our cereal, however.

When we were young (still in the 70's) my mom would only feed us carob products, so we didn't really like chocolate, but when I caught her with her secret stash of Milky Ways, I knew that her standards for us and her were different.

We went through a lot of phases-- no dairy, no wheat, no red meat, so our diets changed a lot. One constant influence, however, was the weekly food ads-- mom would plan her shopping based on the coupons within, and then set out on her 5 grocery store circuit, one per weekday, to buy a few items here, a few there based on sales. Her coupon clipping lead me to try various packaged foods, most memorable being Hot Pockets in early high school.

During elementary school in the 70's my friends were allowed Jif peanut butter, non-homemade jam, Wonderbread, while I had store-ground peanut butter that separated, low to no sugar homemade jams, and whole wheat bread. I was jealous. Now, this is who I am as a mother (although I do allow my daughter chocolate chips.) We were, however, taught to shun twinkies, etc. In middle school my food rebellion became bigger-- I found that my cooking class had recipes calling for chicken breasts-- boneless skinless! My mom couldn't believe not buying a whole chicken to cook. And, I started saving my money to buy donuts or brownies with my friends from the lunch line every day. My best friend had Coke and gummy bears every day. Her mom fed her from Costco (Price Club then.) We ate Calzones every day after school at her house.

In junior high and high school my favorite homemade snack was credited to the rise of the microwave (which I think is a huge contributor to this shift in eating) was a quesadilla. My high school lunch was a flour tortilla, carrots and celery sticks. Mom didn't know that I bought a ham sandwich from the cafeteria, and a package of powdered donettes from the vending machine.

My mom tracked her spending compulsively. I could find out how much she spent on groceries in any given year if you would like.

Eating out was reserved for payday-- the last day of the month, but since we were children of teachers, we didn't eat out from July-August, unless on vacation with relatives. All of our meals on our trips were primarily "home made" meals. Our other special treat was popcorn and fruit on Sunday nights.

Like Spero, I remember 5 and 10 cent candy. Great thread!
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#101 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 03:03 PM
 
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The idea that junk food didn't really become popular until the 80's seems strange to me.
Me, too. We weren't inundated with the advertising like my kids are, but we still had plenty of junk food available.

We had the sugary cereals (same cereal as today, just with the "sugar" now politically correctly removed from the name - Super Sugar Smacks, Sugar Frosted Flakes, Sugar Corn Pops).

We had Dolly Madison before Little Debbie moved into the neighborhood.

We had Swanson TV dinners long before Oscar Mayer had Lunchables.

We had Sunbeam and Wonder breads, and "Diet Rite" bread for the health-conscious (basically, just really skinny white bread sprinkled with sesame seeds ).

We had Spam and Deviled Ham and Chef Boy-ar-Dee and Kraft mac & cheese and Dinty Moore stew and Hormel chili and Banquet pot pies.

We had giant boxes of Jean's potato chips and Cheetos and Jiffy Pop and Cracker Jack and Bugels and Cheez Whiz in a can and Fiddle Faddle.

We had Popsicles and (the REAL) Bomb Pops and Dixie Cups and ice cream sandwiches and Cool Whip and Dream Bars and Fudgesicles and FlavorIce.

Before Mr Ding-A-Ling terrorized neighborhood parents everywhere with his calliope music, we had sno-cones and cotton candy and candy apples at "The Popcorn Wagon" parked on Main St all summer.

We had Pop-Tarts and "toaster swirls" (danish-type things).

We had Coke/Pepsi and Seven Up and Fresca and ~gasp!~ Tab and Orange Crush and Tahitian Treat and Nehi and Yahoo (the chocolate drink, not the internet conglomerate).

We had McDs and Carrolls and Dairy Queen and KFC and Pizza Hut and Arthur Treacher's and Dunkin' Donuts and Orange Julius and Baskin-Robbins and Woolworth's greasy spoon counters - hell, even the Big N (Kmart predecessor) had it's own diner for awhile!

There was plenty of junk to be had in the 60s-70s - trust me, I ate most if not all of it. :

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But DP grew up in small-town upstate NY, and the first McDonald's didn't come to his area until he was in high school,
Yep, I lived in smalltown upstate NY and when we got a McDs - in our one-red light village, no less!!!! - everyone celebrated for at least a week. That was a HUGE deal in 1982!

Every baptized Christian is, or should be, someone with an actual (disturbing) experience, ... a close encounter, with God; someone who, as a result, becomes a disturbing presence to others. - Fr. Anthony J. Gittins, A Presence That Disturbs
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#102 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 06:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by AppleCrisp View Post
Didn't the current nutrition content labels on food become standardized about 15 years ago? I remember when they adopted the current format, but I don't remember what they were like before that....what information was provided and in what format. I don't think my mom ever looked at them, but I don't remember if the lablels were useful back then.
It had more information than it does now. More that was of use to me.
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#103 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 06:42 PM
 
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Well, this isn't "pre80s" because I was born in 1980, but....

our food came from:

our organic vegetable garden, ranging in size from 1/4 acre to multiple acres when I was really little and we lived on my g-pa's farm
mom cans tomatoes, salsa, corn, green beans, jams
dad cans mushrooms, potatoes, meats, pickles
maple syrup from our sugarbush
chickens we raised
eggs from our chickens
barter our chickens for beef
pig we raised our bartered for
fish, fowl, and game dad caught/hunted

At various times we baked our bread, grew sprouts, canned other things from u-picks or wildcrafted, and other times we relied more heavily on things from the grocery (when my parents worked more or siblings were younger). But we always had game and a huge garden. When all 4 kids were at home, we drank a gallon of milk a day. Cereal was Cheerios, raisin bran, shredded wheat, etc (the not so sugary ones). We never had pop. We always had orange juice (concentrate). My parents are a kinda funny mix of poor, thrifty, hippy, organic back-to-the-landers. They'll bbq brats the bartered for, make coleslaw and potato salad from scratch from their garden, and buy potato chips
We ate way better than SAD, but still had treats like pie and cookies mom made, and ice cream from the store. I really can't get into the cost of groceries issue because I am seriously having bad anxiety over the cost of whole foods right now.

Emily, cooking allergen free, knitting, reading, gardening Mom to 1 beautiful girl, born in the water on July 1, 2006 Wife to 1 handsome man since September 10, 2005
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#104 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 06:59 PM
 
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There was a list of ingredients, but that was it. It was really hard being diabetic and having to take a wild guess about what was in stuff.
I think that was two labels ago. They changed it something like 20 or 21 years ago to make it more complete, and it had MORE vitamin/mineral content info than it does now.

The thing that I don't think it had though, and maybe that's what you're referring to, is the sugar/carb content. I know when I've done low-carb that info was invaluable, and I can imagine that it would be so if you are diabetic also.
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#105 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 07:02 PM
 
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Originally Posted by emgremore View Post
Well, this isn't "pre80s" because I was born in 1980, but....

our food came from:

our organic vegetable garden, ranging in size from 1/4 acre to multiple acres when I was really little and we lived on my g-pa's farm
mom cans tomatoes, salsa, corn, green beans, jams
dad cans mushrooms, potatoes, meats, pickles
maple syrup from our sugarbush
chickens we raised
eggs from our chickens
barter our chickens for beef
pig we raised our bartered for
fish, fowl, and game dad caught/hunted

At various times we baked our bread, grew sprouts, canned other things from u-picks or wildcrafted, and other times we relied more heavily on things from the grocery (when my parents worked more or siblings were younger). But we always had game and a huge garden. When all 4 kids were at home, we drank a gallon of milk a day. Cereal was Cheerios, raisin bran, shredded wheat, etc (the not so sugary ones). We never had pop. We always had orange juice (concentrate). My parents are a kinda funny mix of poor, thrifty, hippy, organic back-to-the-landers. They'll bbq brats the bartered for, make coleslaw and potato salad from scratch from their garden, and buy potato chips
We ate way better than SAD, but still had treats like pie and cookies mom made, and ice cream from the store. I really can't get into the cost of groceries issue because I am seriously having bad anxiety over the cost of whole foods right now.
Can I go live with your parents? They sound exactly like me (ask wild fire child, she's my daughter).
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#106 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 08:09 PM
 
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My parents were pretty moderate about the junk food. It wasn't forbidden, but it wasn't by any stretch the only thing we ate.

Soda was very rare in the house until I was in high school. Mom would occasionally buy a 2 liter or a 6 pack of soda, but most often, soda was something we only got if we went out for a meal, were visiting the grandparents, or bought it with our own money.

Mom would buy cookies and snack cakes (she worked next door to a Dolly Madison/Weber bread thrift store that later turned into a Hostess Store), but once the stuff was gone, she wouldn't buy more until the next payday.

Something we didn't get much of was juice boxes or capri suns in our lunches. We had the choice of loading our thermos with water or juice from home, or we could buy milk at school.

Mom did use convenience foods on weekdays (her job requires a lot of standing), but on weekends or days when she wasn't on her feet all day, she'd cook from scratch. I'd say that roughly half of our weekday meals in a given month involved something from a can, box or jar.
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#107 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 08:40 PM
 
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Anyone interested int he history of packaged food needs this book: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=1842717

I am currently reading it, and it's crazy- interesting. It's about the start of the industrial food industry which began right after WW II (although many items did hit before the war's end due to rationing and working women who didn't have time to cook). It's all cherries suspended in jello, and canned soups, and little debbie things, white bread and bologna, TV dinners in *aluminium* trays, canned cling peaches in goodness knows what, deep fried hamburgers etc etc etc. Junk food had it's start, big time, big big big time, right about 1946 or so. A lot of preservation/freezing/dehydrating/packaging etc technology came out of World War II and industry wanted to take the knoweldge (and huge potential for huge bucks) beyond the war years.

Absolutely a good read!

From my childhood, I remember lucky charms, cookie crisps, fritos, pringles (still love them!) white styrofoam bread, oreos, cambell's canned soups, bright orange mac & cheese, jiffy pop, tang, ovaltine, coffee syrup, pop tarts, fluffernutter sandwiches, and more!

My mother hardly ever bought those things, because she loved Julia Child, but man, did we want them! Heaven in my lunch box was crackers and spreadable orange cheese you put on the crackers with a little plastic stick.
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#108 of 109 Old 08-24-2008, 10:18 PM
 
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Anyone interested int he history of packaged food needs this book: http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...toryId=1842717

I am currently reading it, and it's crazy- interesting. It's about the start of the industrial food industry which began right after WW II (although many items did hit before the war's end due to rationing and working women who didn't have time to cook). It's all cherries suspended in jello, and canned soups, and little debbie things, white bread and bologna, TV dinners in *aluminium* trays, canned cling peaches in goodness knows what, deep fried hamburgers etc etc etc. Junk food had it's start, big time, big big big time, right about 1946 or so. A lot of preservation/freezing/dehydrating/packaging etc technology came out of World War II and industry wanted to take the knoweldge (and huge potential for huge bucks) beyond the war years.
Not coincidentally, I believe the advent of chemically dependent farming began with leftover chemicals from WWII as well.
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#109 of 109 Old 08-25-2008, 12:16 AM
 
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Do you know which ones?

The book is a cool read about cultural changes, not so much about nasty chemicals. Although the aluminium pans for frozen dinners does give one pause.

Did you know pesticides have been in use since the ancient Greeks used sulfur to try and save various crops? Pests are a bitch. Feeding thousands-- or millions --or billions-- or the 6 in my family-- does present it's challenges.

The dust bowl in the US --which predates WWII -- was caused by misuse and abuse of soil. So the pesticide issue is an old one.
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