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#91 of 116 Old 10-29-2012, 02:13 PM
 
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What is average is extremely important for a first time mother to use to decide if she needs help! If she bases her decision on your story or what you have written here, she may continue with a poor latch, and that may impact her milk supply enough that she switches to formula. It's pretty obvious that pain means "get a more expert review" to determine if there is a solvable problem! Even if it doesn't affect supply or her decision to continue, why should she be in pain if it can be corrected? Just so you can have a fellow sufferer?
You seriously remind me of my sister-in-law, who has a "everyone should experience what I experience" attitude about pretty much everything.


I think you've totally mis-read her comment, but I know Rrrrrachel is more than capable of explaining her own position, so I'll leave it at that.

 

Your suggestion that she'd encourage women to avoid seeking help simply so that she can have a "fellow sufferer" is really insulting. I don't see anyone here advocating for keeping women in the dark so that they will suffer.

 

As for the "everyone should experience what I experience attitude"...well, that can work in all directions. I think it's a pretty normal human thing to assume that what we experience is "average" and transferable to other people. That's why it's so important to include multiple voices in the conversation, to broaden our perspective.


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#92 of 116 Old 10-29-2012, 02:44 PM
 
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She *is* influencing, whethere she realizes it or not, women who read these threads and do not post, or ask questions. And since she has not expressed agreement that a new mom experiencing pain should seek help, she is implying no help is needed. And the comment where I liken her to my sister-in-law is far more insulting. But at least my comments were finally recognized! Shame I had to insult someone, though!
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#93 of 116 Old 10-29-2012, 02:51 PM
 
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I actually had a pretty easy time breastfeeding, pain wise. Hardly any pain at all, but some discomfort. Barely even needed nipple butter (until I started pumping, that is). I absolutely wish all women had the same breastfeeding experience as me.

But I know they don't. I know my experience is only one variation of normal. I think society spends a lot of time trying to convince women their body is broken, and I don't want to perpetuate that by pretending mine is the ONLY version of normal. That's all.
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#94 of 116 Old 10-29-2012, 04:47 PM
 
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Controversy! Women who are displeased with their breastfeeding experience have so much negative emotion and feel free to share so much.

 

There is no scientific evidence that there is something wrong with telling women that breastfeeding is easy. If you go to kellymom.com you will find the  articles "Breastfeeding: It's So Easy" and many others. Kellymom.com is a well-respected, evidence-based web site. Breastfeeding advocates believe that to improve rates we need to normalize breastfeeding and part of that is telling women it is easy. It is common for women in the US to find motherhood difficult no matter how they feed their babies.

 

It's not really going to help the babies of the women that have weaned if we say breastfeeding is difficult. We may help more babies get a chance at breastfeeding if we say it is easy. Remember the women that come online to talk about breastfeeding may be an accurate sample of the typical experience.
 


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#95 of 116 Old 10-29-2012, 05:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by foreverinbluejeans View Post

Controversy! Women who are displeased with their breastfeeding experience have so much negative emotion and feel free to share so much.

 

I am not sure why they shouldn't feel free to share.

 

There is no scientific evidence that there is something wrong with telling women that breastfeeding is easy. If you go to kellymom.com you will find the  articles "Breastfeeding: It's So Easy" and many others. Kellymom.com is a well-respected, evidence-based web site. Breastfeeding advocates believe that to improve rates we need to normalize breastfeeding and part of that is telling women it is easy. It is common for women in the US to find motherhood difficult no matter how they feed their babies.

 

I agree with much of this paragraph, but I question the bolded.  Something does not have to be easy to be normal.  I had 3 vaginal births.  All would fall within the defines of normal.  I would not call birth "easy" though.  Lots of things are normal without necessarily being easy.

 

It's not really going to help the babies of the women that have weaned if we say breastfeeding is difficult. We may help more babies get a chance at breastfeeding if we say it is easy. 

 

I think it might be best to stay away from terms like "hard" and "easy" when talking to a pregnant or new mum unless you are asked in a very point blank sort of way.  For a pregnant mom, it could set up unrealistic expectations (in either direction), for a new mom that is struggling with breastfeeding, hearing that you think breastfeeding is easy can seem like a slap in the face to what she is going through.


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#96 of 116 Old 10-29-2012, 05:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by foreverinbluejeans View Post

Controversy! Women who are displeased with their breastfeeding experience have so much negative emotion and feel free to share so much.

 

There is no scientific evidence that there is something wrong with telling women that breastfeeding is easy. If you go to kellymom.com you will find the  articles "Breastfeeding: It's So Easy" and many others. Kellymom.com is a well-respected, evidence-based web site. Breastfeeding advocates believe that to improve rates we need to normalize breastfeeding and part of that is telling women it is easy. It is common for women in the US to find motherhood difficult no matter how they feed their babies.

 

It's not really going to help the babies of the women that have weaned if we say breastfeeding is difficult. We may help more babies get a chance at breastfeeding if we say it is easy. Remember the women that come online to talk about breastfeeding may be an accurate sample of the typical experience.
 

 

 

it's really not helpful to not be upfront and honest either.  My experience was horrendous the first time around and it was due to the RAH RAHing around me and everyone telling me the pain I felt was NORMAL.  And it wasn't at all.  Just massage that out and you'll be fine.  I wasn't.  And really that almost ruined it for me.  I felt let down by my community of BFing mothers.  I really did.  I knew nothing about it and wanted so badly to do it.  And really I consider my 60lb weight loss in 6 wweks and severe postpartum depression to the failure I felt about breastfeeding. 

 

I continued to BF and did so for my second bb, but I will NEVER NEVER NEVER tell a woman that she's just doing it wrong or lie and tell her it's so natural it's easy.  I would want them to know all of it.  Knowing everything would not have stopped me from bfing but I do think I would have gone in earlier when the pain was too much.  I wouldn't have felt like a failure and I would have gone through so much pain. 

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#97 of 116 Old 10-30-2012, 02:21 PM
 
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The reason kellymom.com IS such a great resource is that it acknowledges the many difficulties you can run into with breastfeeding. It also offers solutions. I used the site all the time when my son and I were learning how to breastfeed (yeah, both of us had to figure it out!) and never felt that it was telling me breastfeeding was necessarily easy. 


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#98 of 116 Old 10-30-2012, 06:14 PM
 
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Like anything else, it makes life a lot easier or one mom, not for another. These experiences are never universal. Of course there's always the unknown of what would a particular kid have gone through with/without breastfeeding. Maybe my daughter would've gotten more sick more often. Maybe your kid is just lucky and wouldn't have gotten sick much either way. Who knows!

Me too, but you know that's because our kids were vaxxed, right?

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what i meant is  if it hurts there is something going on like tongue tie, lip tie, bad latch etc.  if dont correctly BFing should not hurt KWIM?  ive just heard too many women use this as an excuse to stop trying without addressing why it's hurting. kind of sad

With DD, she had latch issues, a lip tie, and I was pumping and syringe feeding her. It hurt like hell. 

With DS, he latched perfectly 5 minutes after birth, had no lip or tongue tie, and his latch was checked by two different LC's. AND it hurt like hell. 

 

I tell all my pregnant mama friends who are first time moms three things: contractions are not the same thing as "bad menstrual cramps", crowning feels like your vaginal opening is being tattooed, and breastfeeding might hurt like hell for the first month or so. 

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#99 of 116 Old 10-30-2012, 06:17 PM
 
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Breastfeeding definitely HURT my nipples and both my kids' latches were perfect. After a few weeks the pain lessened but during times of teething it came right back. It was really frustrating for me to hear that BFing wasn't supposed to be painful at all... it made me feel like I was doing something wrong even though I wasn't, my nipples just weren't used to that kind of touch.


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#100 of 116 Old 10-30-2012, 10:00 PM
 
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Me too, but you know that's because our kids were vaxxed, right?

With DD, she had latch issues, a lip tie, and I was pumping and syringe feeding her. It hurt like hell. 

With DS, he latched perfectly 5 minutes after birth, had no lip or tongue tie, and his latch was checked by two different LC's. AND it hurt like hell. 

 

I tell all my pregnant mama friends who are first time moms three things: contractions are not the same thing as "bad menstrual cramps", crowning feels like your vaginal opening is being tattooed, and breastfeeding might hurt like hell for the first month or so. 

 

 

GAWD, I was just thinking about this.  I thought I had to pee and that my lady corner was being dismantled all at the same.  RING OF FIRE!!!  However when the nurse told me I didn't have to pee I had to push I felt pretty relieved because that burning was HELLISH!

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#101 of 116 Old 10-30-2012, 11:13 PM
 
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I heard the reverse actually. Tons of horror stories and very little "it was fine/easy" before I had my eldest child. Thankfully, for me, it was easy. I think it's fair to say that for some women it *is* easy. For some women, it's really hard. And for many, it's somewhere in between. I have no problem acknowledging this. If it's hard or painful, you should have it checked out to see if there's anything that can be done. Sometimes there isn't, as other posters have said. Many times though, there are things you can do to make it easier. It doesn't mean you're doing it "wrong," it's not a test that you can pass or fail. It just means the positions can often be adjusted to feel better. Just like clothes, or bras can be adjusted. 

 

I'm happy to offer help when people want it. And I'm happy to offer support when people want it. But while I think nursing is great, if you don't wanna nurse, (or if you want to but it's too hard and the help's not helping you, and you decide you don't want to any more), then... don't nurse. I'm not you or your baby, so what business is it of mine?

 

I'll keep telling women that it was very easy for me, but that's not universal. If it's painful or hard, get it checked out by an LC or LLL leader, to see if adjustments or tweaks can be made to make it more comfortable. And that I found it very valuable to me and my children. But I don't think anyone should feel forced to nurse. 

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#102 of 116 Old 10-31-2012, 12:34 AM
 
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I think we scared a woman out of nursing during a LLL meeting.  Somone said, "I'm not going to lie, it's tough."  We were trying to be honest about some of our hardships.  I heard this woman say, "I thought I'd breastfeed, but now hearing all these problems, I'm really rethinking it."

 

We all have different thresholds and tolerances. With my first, it hurt a lot in the beginning.  I went online and said, "Please tell me this gets easier."  People said, "Oh yes, it gets easier!"  That is exactly what I needed to hear.  Now it didn't stop completely hurting for months, and I knew she had a bad latch, but it wasn't that painful, it was just like a pinching feeling.  With my second, when things were going right, I knew then how bad things had been with my first. 

 

Now my children are 13 and 9, I haven't nursed them in years.  Being a mother is hard.  I would say that I would have liked people to tell me that, but I wouldn't.  I was going to experience it myself.  I didn't want to hear the horror stories of birth either.  Most women don't.  I definitely think women need to hear that it's a challenge, that it's tough.  Eventually if it isn't working for us, if we don't feel the challenges are worth it, we'll move to another way of feeding.

 

Before I had my first, I was mostly worried about it not working.  I grew up in a family of formula feeders, I wasn't sure if it really was possible in some part of my mind.  And it was possible, but it wasn't easy, and I remember thinking at one point that I had one month down and only 11 more to go, and I was so ready to be done.  But then it got easier around 9 months or so, so I kept on.  I've had to bottle feed many of my younger relatives, and I didn't like that either.  In fact, it was part one of the reasons I wanted to try breastfeeding.  My one niece cried all the time.  I remember getting up in the middle of the night with her because I couldn't get my sister to wake up.  I gave her a bottle, but then I had to pace the floor with her to get her to go to sleep finally.  Her father paced the floor with her for hours every night.  And then later, when she had her first baby, the formula caused this rock hard stomach with distention, and that wasn't easy either.  My niece, however, loved bottle feeding much more than breast, so she moved to that and never looked back.

 

I can understand the need for the OP's post.  It's kind of a vent coupled with a strong statement implying that breastfeeding mothers do tell everyone breastfeeding is easy.  Then the second poster makes her own strong statement in contradiction, saying that it *is* easy.  I understand how dismissive that must feel, but I think this illustrates the point well that every experience is different, and it can be easy for some, it can be really challenging for some.  I think we have to acknowledge that and tell people that breastfeeding as a biological function may not go smoothly, there may be problems, it may be challenging, it may open up a lot of feelings you didn't know you had.  But I think there are always pay-offs for the troubles.

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#103 of 116 Old 10-31-2012, 04:03 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I can understand the need for the OP's post.  It's kind of a vent coupled with a strong statement implying that breastfeeding mothers do tell everyone breastfeeding is easy.  Then the second poster makes her own strong statement in contradiction, saying that it *is* easy.  I understand how dismissive that must feel, but I think this illustrates the point well that every experience is different, and it can be easy for some, it can be really challenging for some.  I think we have to acknowledge that and tell people that breastfeeding as a biological function may not go smoothly, there may be problems, it may be challenging, it may open up a lot of feelings you didn't know you had.  But I think there are always pay-offs for the troubles.

 

Whilst I agree with a lot of what you wrote here, I think you're missing that the third poster said it is easy and feels good and if it isn't easy and doesn't feel good, you are doing something wrong.  That is a completely different message than simply sharing an experience.  That was a declaration to all breastfeeding mothers and it is helpful to no one.  That said, I recognize that breastfeeding is easy for some and I think that's wonderful.  I had two amazing, fairly easy labors and deliveries.  I would never assume everyone had my experience and if they didn't, they did something wrong or didn't do something right. 

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#104 of 116 Old 10-31-2012, 05:11 PM
 
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I feel like one of the big points is here is to say:

 

It can be really easy, sometimes even from day 1;it can be a struggle at times, even after many months; 

either way, its a learning process and rarely your fault.

Above all it's important to have both technical and emotional support, at every stage.

It's worth it,

we're proud of you.


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#105 of 116 Old 10-31-2012, 06:21 PM
 
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There's no one magical thing you can tell all women that will be the right thing to say in every case! For instance, my sister-in-law just had a baby and was having a lot of trouble breastfeeding. It always seemed like there was this or that problem; nothing was going right; she was doing it wrong; the baby was doing it wrong. They were on the point of giving up, and her doctor said, "Well, you know, for some women, it can be really hard," which is exactly the WRONG thing to say.

 

I got one of my friends, who's a lactation consultant, in her house and they just had a lie down on the couch. She basically needed to be told that the baby was fine, that there was a wide range of "normal" ways to nurse, that both of them just needed to relax and let it happen and not worry about what other people said or thought. She needed to be told it was easy! And all of their "problems" just melted away.

 

Sometimes being told it's easy *is* the right thing.

 

But not every time.

 

I'd say take it on a case by case basis!

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#106 of 116 Old 11-02-2012, 10:24 AM
 
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YES!!!

 

Finally someone who feels the way I do.

My co-worker and his wife just had a baby, and they go on and on about how "easy" their baby is and how "easy" bfing has been.

I met his wife, and when I told her I had a really hard time for the first month, she completely agreed, and told me how overwhelmed she felt.
WTF?! Why do people do that? IT's ok to say it's challenging and horribly, horribly HARD WORK. but work every single second.

I see breastfeeding as a labor of love. No it's not easy, no I can't say my boobs feels great or look great, but i know it's what's best for my daughter.

 

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#107 of 116 Old 11-02-2012, 10:50 AM
 
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Well said namaste.gif
 

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#108 of 116 Old 11-03-2012, 07:50 AM
 
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Never trust the husbands version :-)

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#109 of 116 Old 11-04-2012, 01:47 PM
 
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I feel like one of the big points is here is to say:

 

It can be really easy, sometimes even from day 1;it can be a struggle at times, even after many months; 

either way, its a learning process and rarely your fault.

Above all it's important to have both technical and emotional support, at every stage.

It's worth it,

we're proud of you.

 

I love this approach.

 

I did have an overall pretty easy experience breastfeeding all of mine and through many different variations (through pg, tandem, triandem, etc), compared to what many mamas face.  BUT I would never tell anyone that "it's easy" because I know it's not for everyone, and I would HATE HATE HATE someone to give up because they thought they were doing something wrong because it WASN'T easy for them.  :(  I definitely would approach it with a positive attitude, but a realistic one as well.  I just tend to stick with the "it's totally worth it" phrase. :)

 

That said, situations can also change at any stage, any time along the way.  Like for us, we did it with zero troubles for a 2.5 years and then about a year into my tandem experience we got thrush, and then we had it off and on for THREE YEARS from that point on (8 months straight when DS was born). 


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#110 of 116 Old 11-07-2012, 05:05 PM
 
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I just took the moment to peek in on this thread, and I have just read the first post.  I'll come back to the rest bit by bit but I just needed to reply.

 

Mulvah, even after almost 8 years since I began nursing, and 6 years since my first daughter was weaned, I am in tears reading your post.  It was that hard.  Everything short of mastitis that can make nursing difficult happened for me and my first child.  And I'm still crying about this.  I'm done nursing, and I still am crying about this.  DD wound up with allergies while EBing, and I didn't recognize it because nursing was already that bad, that unpleasant, that frustrating.  It started on the day she was born and only got worse.

 

I had no idea how many problems I had with my first daughter until my second daughter latched on like a vacuum and nursed away.  That easy?  I'm sure I cried then, too.  I know I was in pain of a different sort because she nursed so hard my nipples were sore and cracked for nearly 2 weeks.  

 

I just can't believe how much my experience affected me.  That it is that close to the surface, still.  

 

I'll read more.


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#111 of 116 Old 11-08-2012, 07:32 AM
 
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Breastfeeding for me was hard at the beginning and it also hurt (not OMG hurt, but significant) at the beginning too which in talking to women I know is pretty normal. Once I got past the first month, yes it was easier than bottle feeding for me as I had no issues really. When I went back to work FT, it would have been much easier not to pump, that was work to do that especially since my supply was always tight (damn efficient body!), but it was worth it.

I 100% agree that I wish there was more sympathy and help offered than just sort of a casual brush off when women have problems breastfeeding. And the expectation that everything will be sunshine and roses is not realistic for most women, at least at the start. Sometimes it is easy from the start, but IME that is the exception. More support and less platitudes would go a long way. I know if I hadn't done my research and had my awesome online support, I would have quit BFing early as what my doctors and nurses and whatnot had to offer me was just the typical "Breast is best!", but no real clue how to navigate problems.

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#112 of 116 Old 11-08-2012, 08:13 AM
 
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#113 of 116 Old 11-08-2012, 08:32 AM
 
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Originally Posted by foreverinbluejeans View Post

It is much harder to bottle feed and care for a child when you don't have magic breasts that calm the child.

Bolding mine.  This post has been picked into a million pieces, but this is what is so frustrating for me.  I only got my Magic Breasts for child #2, who even named them.  We had a good nursing relationship and it was, indeed, easy (excepting a toddler smacking her on the head...)

 

But those breasts were not magic for my oldest.  She would start screaming and keep screaming through the let down (big let down... all over the place of course because she was screaming).  I could only nurse her once I got her to sleep (and lying down).  Touchy supply issues.  Shortish arms, largish breasts that made holding her securely difficult (and discovering, quite embarrassingly that Boppies are made for mamas with 24" waists).  And nursing made my legs twitch and my nerves all frayed.  It was not relaxing at all--and forget sleeping while nursing.  Not sure why I'm wired that way, but there it is.

 

It was hell.  Yes, there was something wrong, and I sought help from people who would know.  "You're doing fine", (LLL) or "What makes you think there is a problem?" (LC).  Bad advice also from my "trusted" ARNP (who made me worry about her weight and the worry made my supply drop because it was that touchy.  But, "why do you think that?" from the LC).  

 

The help I received was no help at all.  I had no internet.  And I had no Magic Breasts.

 

Looking back as an experienced mama, I see that she had weak muscles, I had flat nipples.  She had trouble getting a letdown from me, and then....whooooosh!  She had a slight overbite.  She was easily "put off", meaning one little movement and she was done nursing (and...screaming!).  Years later, the dentist said she noticed dd swallowed "wrong".  Yes, she had allergies too that I didn't pay attention to.  But I had received help, and everyone said things were "fine".  I knew they weren't fine.  

 

Any normal person in my shoes would have given up, but I didn't.  I often think that I did the right thing, nutritionally, for my daughter.  But I wonder whether we would have had a better relationship had I bottle fed her.  She has allergies, but tolerates soy.  I wonder whether her belly would have been more full (because she usually stopped nursing out of frustration, not from fullness) whether she would have had fewer eating difficulties as a toddler (she didn't learn to associate food with hunger until she was 4.5yo, probably due to pain issues in infancy), whether her extreme neediness would be muted.  


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#114 of 116 Old 11-09-2012, 04:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post

I just took the moment to peek in on this thread, and I have just read the first post.  I'll come back to the rest bit by bit but I just needed to reply.

 

Mulvah, even after almost 8 years since I began nursing, and 6 years since my first daughter was weaned, I am in tears reading your post.  It was that hard.  Everything short of mastitis that can make nursing difficult happened for me and my first child.  And I'm still crying about this.  I'm done nursing, and I still am crying about this.  DD wound up with allergies while EBing, and I didn't recognize it because nursing was already that bad, that unpleasant, that frustrating.  It started on the day she was born and only got worse.

 

I had no idea how many problems I had with my first daughter until my second daughter latched on like a vacuum and nursed away.  That easy?  I'm sure I cried then, too.  I know I was in pain of a different sort because she nursed so hard my nipples were sore and cracked for nearly 2 weeks.  

 

I just can't believe how much my experience affected me.  That it is that close to the surface, still.  

 

I'll read more.

 

hug2.gif

 

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Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post

Bolding mine.  This post has been picked into a million pieces, but this is what is so frustrating for me.  I only got my Magic Breasts for child #2, who even named them.  We had a good nursing relationship and it was, indeed, easy (excepting a toddler smacking her on the head...)

 

But those breasts were not magic for my oldest.  She would start screaming and keep screaming through the let down (big let down... all over the place of course because she was screaming).  I could only nurse her once I got her to sleep (and lying down).  Touchy supply issues.  Shortish arms, largish breasts that made holding her securely difficult (and discovering, quite embarrassingly that Boppies are made for mamas with 24" waists).  And nursing made my legs twitch and my nerves all frayed.  It was not relaxing at all--and forget sleeping while nursing.  Not sure why I'm wired that way, but there it is.

 

It was hell.  Yes, there was something wrong, and I sought help from people who would know.  "You're doing fine", (LLL) or "What makes you think there is a problem?" (LC).  Bad advice also from my "trusted" ARNP (who made me worry about her weight and the worry made my supply drop because it was that touchy.  But, "why do you think that?" from the LC).  

 

The help I received was no help at all.  I had no internet.  And I had no Magic Breasts.

 

Looking back as an experienced mama, I see that she had weak muscles, I had flat nipples.  She had trouble getting a letdown from me, and then....whooooosh!  She had a slight overbite.  She was easily "put off", meaning one little movement and she was done nursing (and...screaming!).  Years later, the dentist said she noticed dd swallowed "wrong".  Yes, she had allergies too that I didn't pay attention to.  But I had received help, and everyone said things were "fine".  I knew they weren't fine.  

 

Any normal person in my shoes would have given up, but I didn't.  I often think that I did the right thing, nutritionally, for my daughter.  But I wonder whether we would have had a better relationship had I bottle fed her.  She has allergies, but tolerates soy.  I wonder whether her belly would have been more full (because she usually stopped nursing out of frustration, not from fullness) whether she would have had fewer eating difficulties as a toddler (she didn't learn to associate food with hunger until she was 4.5yo, probably due to pain issues in infancy), whether her extreme neediness would be muted.  

 

Thank you for sharing.  I am really comforted by what you wrote, specifically the bolded.  I have had this problem with both of my children and though it is possible they both had sensitivities to dairy, I am beginning to wonder whether I am just wired differently than many (most?) women.  

 

Lastly, you wrote, "I wonder whether we would have had a better relationship had I bottle fed her" and that is my current struggle.  I wrote on this very forum about the lack of bond I had with my first baby (now toddler) because breastfeeding was such a struggle.  We did eventually bond, but it took a while.  I bonded much easier with my second baby because I knew what joy a child was from having my first, but I still feel twitchy when nursing and I do not enjoy it.  I often wonder if this does or will impact our relationship and it breaks my heart.  I wonder if it is really worth it. 

 

Anyhow, thank you for sharing your story.  smile.gif

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#115 of 116 Old 11-09-2012, 04:50 PM
 
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on just that point of having a better relationship by NOT feeding at the breast, i can see that being the case for some folks. neither of my twins got super good at nursing till they were 6 months, so i did lots of pumping and bottle feeding, so i can tell you that theyr are ways to bottle feed that leads to more or less bonding, just like everything and i think that you can get amazing closeness and wonder as you sit and cuddle a baby and attentively feed them a bottle, yes absolutely. ou can get skin to skin, they can still gaze up at you and for many who struggle, it can be even a much more peaceful time, where you can totally concentrate on giving to your baby and not maybe fretting on what is being taken or put on you. 

i loved feeding directly from my breast once we got there and yes i was heartbroken by our early issue, but i know i loved watching them eat and grow and get full, no matter the form


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#116 of 116 Old 11-09-2012, 04:52 PM
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I, too, have a nerve in my foot that pings when I nurse on the right side.  And one that pings in the roof of my mouth when I nurse on the left.  You aren't the only one who has some funky nerve connections.


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