Brooke Shields/PPD on Oprah - Page 4 - Mothering Forums

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#91 of 102 Old 05-08-2005, 03:30 PM
 
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I read an excerpt from her book but did not see the Oprah show.

I'm just highly disappointed that our media and PPD's "spokespeople" constantly fail to mention that it's the interventions and artificial baby milk that can cause all these problems to begin with. Don't get me wrong - I had the homebirth of my dreams with my first and she never had one drop of formula, despite the fact that nursing hurt so bad I cried hysterically through EVERY SINGLE NURSING SESSION for the first three months - and I had severe PPD, probably because I was undiagnosed bipolar until a couple years later.

But... it is well documented that the intricate dance of hormones during an unmedicated birth and during lactation greatly decreases the chance of PPD, and decreases the longevity and severity in those women who DO experience it. It really, really gets me that I never hear mention of this, despite the fact that it is basic common sense. I mean, I got pregnant with my first at 19... and I knew more about pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding than people twice my age with twice as many kids! I just get so confused and incredibly discouraged when women refuse to learn even the basic biology of normal human birth and lactation. I think that knowing that alone would greatly decrease all of the intervention and ignorance that increases the likelihood of PPD.
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#92 of 102 Old 05-08-2005, 04:43 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tanibani
Do you think her rep contacted them? Or do you think they contacted her? I'm guessing they contacted her. Perhaps they contact all celebrities with mainstream appeal (snip)... they are trying to sell a product. And wouldn't it be great for them to have a well-known, well-liked, no skeletons in the closet celebrity selling ABM.
Yes, this same formula company tried, and failed, to get Kelly Ripa and Sarah Jessica Parker to sell baby formula. That's just my opinion/hunch...I believe that they turned BB down, rather than the other way round like they imply. Nice try spinning it though.

From an old thread at bf advocacy from when these Brooke commercials started....

"Shields to Pitch Infant Formula" article
Mon Jul 7, 2003
(This article originally in Adweek magazine on adweek.com.
It required registering to read it.)

Quote:
New mom Brooke Shields...who started her endorsement career at 11 months as the Ivory Snow baby, has signed on as spokesperson for Bright Beginnings, a new line of baby formula from PBM Products.

...also considered celebrity moms such as Sarah Jessica Parker and Kelly Ripa, but chose Shields, 38, because she has an "image that is thoughtful and intelligent" and appeals to younger moms, as well as older moms who "have grown up with Brooke..."

Take the time to heal from your marriage before you move on with someone else. Make a list of all the qualities you would like in a new partner and then work on growing that way yourself. ~mandib50
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#93 of 102 Old 05-08-2005, 05:49 PM
 
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yesterday at Barnes and Noble I picked up her book, opened it and I could not put it down! Now I'm going to have to read it.. very interesting.
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#94 of 102 Old 05-09-2005, 12:32 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by candiland
I read an excerpt from her book but did not see the Oprah show.

I'm just highly disappointed that our media and PPD's "spokespeople" constantly fail to mention that it's the interventions and artificial baby milk that can cause all these problems to begin with.
I see your point--breastfeeding does have a big part in the hormonal aspect of PPD....but it did not come into play in Brooke's case. She was breastfeeding and not supplementing at all when she was in the worst of her depression (within the first 6 months). That is why she probably did not mention it--it did not apply to her situation. They did not really have any other "experts" or spokespeople on the the show that day. She mentioned breastfeeding a great deal (as she does in her book) in the light that she was committed to it even though she was extremely depressed. It was a connection to her baby that she would not give up.
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#95 of 102 Old 05-09-2005, 12:35 PM
 
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About her daughter's feelings...I hope not, but her dd may herself have ppd one day. I had it, my mother had it, and I can't be sure but I suspect my maternal grandmother suffered from depression as well. So getting the truth out there within her family could be helpful.

Take the time to heal from your marriage before you move on with someone else. Make a list of all the qualities you would like in a new partner and then work on growing that way yourself. ~mandib50
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#96 of 102 Old 05-12-2005, 03:42 AM
 
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Originally Posted by LisainCalifornia
I see your point--breastfeeding does have a big part in the hormonal aspect of PPD....but it did not come into play in Brooke's case. She was breastfeeding and not supplementing at all when she was in the worst of her depression (within the first 6 months). That is why she probably did not mention it--it did not apply to her situation.
Formula may not have been involved, but the emergency C-section could have made a difference, at least in the severity. As far as bfing preventing PPD, I don't think that's common knowledge at this point, even among so-called experts.

Jen 47 DS C 2/03  angel.gif04/29/08/ DD S 10/28/09 DH Bill '97.

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#97 of 102 Old 05-12-2005, 01:35 PM
 
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I don't really think it is fair to say that bf'ing can prevent PPD. I have been nursing for over a year now and, had a very natural homebirth-nothing tramatic at all-and am suffering from PPD pretty bad.

I know that bf'ing can play a role in warding off PPD, but it alone will not prevent it.

Amber, 32~ DH, 30~ DD, 8~ DD, 6
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#98 of 102 Old 05-12-2005, 02:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tanibani
I didn't have PPD, but it was love at first sight with my 2 babies (one hospital birth, another home birth) either. Anybody else?
I'm a number of pages late, but I wanted to say that I personally had a natural birth gone horribly wrong, ended in a c-section, milk came in late so I had to supplement with formula until it did, and I had PPD, but I fell completely and totally in love with my son the moment I saw his tiny hand sticking up while they were reviving him on the warming table.

I mean, I was totally in love with him before that, but at that moment I literally felt my heart ache.

I feel very lucky for this...my PPD manifested in severe anxiety and the inability to leave the bedroom where we were ensconced to do anything - eat, answer the phone, bathe, you name it. My son was perfectly well cared for, but I was a wreck--sleep deprived and not eating, etc. I lost all my baby weight in two weeks.

Looking back I called it the "Post Partum Depression Weight Loss Program."
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#99 of 102 Old 05-12-2005, 04:28 PM
 
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On the term baby nurse--

that is what Shields called it in the book excerpt I read. I agree that the term is old-fashioned and implies more of a rigid, put-the-baby-on-a-schedule type. And perhaps the most approrpriate current terms would be post-partum doula. But not everybody is familiar with this new term and I think some people still use baby nurse to describe any kind of person you hire to be in your home and help you care for the baby.

I've read two different things in this thread about the formula ads: that she signed to do them before the birth and that she was approached by the company afterward. The former situation gives me a less favorable impression of Shields (though I don't think it makes her evil or anything), but if she was approached afterward by the company and from the description sounds like she was cajoled into doing it (being told, "You can still breastfeed, just supplement with our formula" blehh) at a vulnerable point, I feel a lot more ire toward that formula company than anyone. That's so slimy.
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#100 of 102 Old 05-14-2005, 02:56 PM
 
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There was some discussion a while back of sleep deprivation's effect on depression; I just wanted to point out that different individuals can have very different sleep needs. By the age of 22 I had come to realize that I need more sleep than some people and that I'm a sensitive sleeper. I had friends in college who could fall over and sleep in the back of a car and get by fine on 6-7 hours sleep, but I need a minimum of 8 hours and preferably 9. If I get less, I'm anywhere from cranky to downright mean, and get sick easily. All this is something I just accepted...until I had a baby. Then I was thrown into the whole "just sleep when your baby sleeps" advice thing and trust me, it didn't work, especially when at age one my daughter began only napping if I drove her around in the car the entire time. Ugh. (Thank god gas wasn't $2.40 a gallon at that time!) I tried to be creative about getting enough sleep, but to no avail. Being woken up many times per night (until I nightweaned at 19 months, after that it was only 2-3 times till age 3) well that felt like torture. I never, ever, once was able to just sleep through nursing my daughter as some lucky moms can. I tried to mostly grin and bear it...after all I was the one who wanted a baby...but by 18 months I was extremely depressed. There were other factors, but I think sleep deprivation was one of the 2 key reasons for my depression.

I'm trying to conceive again -- I have no idea what I'll do differently this time but I know from experience I have to find a way to get more unbroken sleep. I guess I'm just praying to the "easy baby" gods that my next baby doesn't fight sleep and wake as often!

Carol
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#101 of 102 Old 05-14-2005, 11:15 PM
 
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ITA - I needed more unbroken sleep than my baby did. Sans baby I would get 8-9 hours a night to feel rested. When ds arrived, he was a terrible sleeper and I felt as if I was being tortured. He's 20 months now and has suddenly started sleeping through the night. (A couple months ago he would still wake me 6-7 times a night.) I am so elated that he's finally sleeping better that I feel like I could throw a party.

Its hard for someone who needs less sleep or who's baby is a better sleeper to understand but exhaustion really can take a heavy toll on your emotional state. I thank heaven everyday that my dh needs way less sleep than I do and is so supportive - otherwise I'd be a complete wreck by now.
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#102 of 102 Old 05-18-2005, 06:45 PM
 
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I saw her interview and read her book. I experienced many of the same things she did especially the horrid visualizations of something happening to the baby and also the desire to hurt myself. The one thing that bugged me in her book was that she did use the Ferber method on her dd. That could have contributed to a lot. I mean the thought of your baby CIO and all that agony had to make her PPD worse wouldn't you think?
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