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#1 of 14 Old 12-30-2008, 02:56 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I want my baby to go to a Montessori school around two year of age, but what can I be doing now to raise her in the Montessori way (she's 9 months). Is she too young for it?What are some books you recommend or other resources???
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#2 of 14 Old 12-30-2008, 03:06 AM
 
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I'd read Understanding the Human Being: The importance of the first three years of life.

Lots of great ideas there. Also, if you can order a Michael Olaf 0-3 catalogue. not only do they sell wonderful Montessori products for little ones, there is a ton of info regarding the pedagogy/philosophy.

Otherwise, lots of floor time, limited (or none ideally) amount of time in containers such as swings, bouncer, cribs, exersaucer things, etc. Manipulatives such as simple shape sorters, puzzles, ring stackers, are good. A mirror would be nice so she can see her movements when trying to crawl, pull-up and walk. Encouraging/allowing lots of independance (and yes, it can work well even if you are AP)

If you don't co-sleep, you can put a mattress on the floor so she can get in and out herself.

If you have started to introduce food, give her real dishes - including tiny silverware, an open glass, etc. Let her feed herself but encourage/model the use of her spoon and fork.

Just a few ideas. Maybe read Montessori from the Start? I'll have to look at my books and see what else I'd recommend.

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#3 of 14 Old 12-30-2008, 07:49 AM
 
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I want my baby to go to a Montessori school around two year of age, but what can I be doing now to raise her in the Montessori way (she's 9 months). Is she too young for it?What are some books you recommend or other resources???
It seems we are getting a lot more infant and toddler questions lately. There are 2 books I recommend, then I want to mention one more thing.

The first one is by Paula Polk Lillard and it's called "Montessori Today: A Comprehensive Approach to Education from Birds to Adulthood." Actually, it's from BIRTH to adulthood, but I thought that typo I made was funny, so I left it in there. Here's a link to it:
http://astore.amazon.com/monteblog-20/detail/080521061X

The 2nd book is called "Your Self Confident Baby." I have no experience with this book other than a few people recommended it, so I think I'll pass it on:
http://astore.amazon.com/monteblog-20/detail/0471178837

The point I would like to make with this is a key point in Montessori: Don't worry. Not that it sounds like you're worrying, but remember to think of educating your child means understanding what the development of your child is and how to help them along in the next step. As an infant, your baby's primary need is to feel secure and build up trust with you. If that need is met, you're 100 steps ahead of many people in our country and you're on the right track.

Matt
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#4 of 14 Old 12-30-2008, 02:23 PM
 
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I was wondering the same thing for my 3 mo, since I want my older son to start M school, so I started checking out the Montessori threads. You know what I found out? That in many ways, what I was doing already was working!!

What did I do? I have no idea, specifically. I just interacted with him to what I thought was appropriate and let him do learning about his world. For example, at about 18 months he 'got into' the salt and pepper shakers... so I got out a cookie sheet and told him to shake away! When he wanted to sweep I got him a broom/mop/etc and let him learn from my model. When he dumped out the coffee grounds (a sensory learning experience I wish he hadn't done in the middle of my kitchen... grumble) I gave him the dustbuster and told him to clean it up (with guidance of course). When he asked to do potty learning at 20 months, we did. And so on. At 8 months he was getting puffed rice out of the lazy susan!! (actually he was interested in how it worked and would crawl over and spin it so I put puffed rice on the bottom shelf)

B wife to B and mama to my two boys B 1/23/07 via csect and H 9/27/08 my vbac babe!
We , selectively (don't) vax, babywear, cosleep, love music, and try to be as crunchy as we can get!
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#5 of 14 Old 12-30-2008, 07:13 PM
 
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I gotta agree with Matt regarding trust and security being the biggest thing to strive for during the infant period. A strong sense of trust will be what allows them to explore the world around them. At this point, your 9 month old is likely mobile or getting there, so if she feels secure with her attachment to you, she'll be able to leave you and move around and check everything out... and then she'll learn by doing, of course

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#6 of 14 Old 12-31-2008, 02:04 AM
 
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There's also a yahoo group called "Montessori_Beginnings" that deals with the birth-3 age. You might want to look them up on yahoo. They have more experience than I do
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#7 of 14 Old 01-03-2009, 11:52 PM
 
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I got the book "In a Montessori Home". It is short and to the point about how to prepare your home environment in a way that will enable your baby/toddler to be independant and secure.

Here is a link:

http://www.montessori-namta.org/NAMT...arentpubs.html
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#8 of 14 Old 01-04-2009, 05:50 PM
 
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You're never too young for Montessori! With the really little ones it's more of a state of mind and way of doing things. I researched and researched what to do before DS was born. I also have a great resource in my mom who is a M teacher and my experience working in M schools, but when DS started attending the infant program at my school at 6 months I learned a lot.

At 9 months here are some simple things- that you might already do!- to get started with.

Let her feed herself as much as possible and always give her a spoon even if she's not able to use it so she can get used to it and experiment.

Give her a small cup instead or a sippy cup or bottle with meals. We loved using small glass shot glasses. Start with just a little bit of water in it.

Let her "roam free" as much as possible, i.e. not be confined in a playpen, exersaucer, swing- things like that.

We bought a pull up bar and mirror like this:

http://www.lakeshorelearning.com/seo.../furniture.jsp

It didn't make it totally up for DS- we have one of the mirror panels in his room- but we're going to put it up like this for baby #2. DS loved this bar and mirror at school.

Try and give baby things made out of natural and beautiful materials, like wood, wool, etc. and DS really liked just playing with household items that were safe for him. You could make a "discovery basket" filled with items for her to play with.

You could also think about the whole floor bed idea. DH wasn't so comfortable with it when DS was younger, but after he turned one he was sleeping on a mattress on the floor in his small childproofed room.

I liked this book for the simplicity and the beautiful pictures- it's not overly a "philosophy" book at all, just a nice guide on how to set up your home:

http://www.amazon.com/How-Raise-Amaz...1102054&sr=8-1

Good luck and have fun!
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#9 of 14 Old 01-16-2009, 06:10 PM
 
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I'm glad this was posted. I was wondering when to begin with my 5mo. I often feel at a loss with stimulating his mind. Some ideas here have helped. Hmmm,Now what to do with the crib

 Wife of 10 yrs to Oaties, Mama to Bubs 08/06/08, Rizie 04/19/10 & MRae 02/02/13 & to dog2.gif

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#10 of 14 Old 01-16-2009, 06:15 PM
 
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I'm glad this was posted. I was wondering when to begin with my 5mo. I often feel at a loss with stimulating his mind. Some ideas here have helped. Hmmm,Now what to do with the crib
take it down and sell it

or it can be a very big laundry basket

ribboncesarean.gif cesareans happen.
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#11 of 14 Old 01-18-2009, 10:29 PM
 
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Originally Posted by crookedsprout View Post
I want my baby to go to a Montessori school around two year of age, but what can I be doing now to raise her in the Montessori way (she's 9 months). Is she too young for it?What are some books you recommend or other resources???
If you call Michael Olaf (www.michaelolaf.com) at (888) 880-9235 and ask for the Joyful Child catalog (which is for ages birth to 3), you will find a lot of helpful information and products ($$$!) to buy.
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#12 of 14 Old 01-21-2009, 01:32 PM
 
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Thanks for this thread. I'm always looking for more ways to implement m principles.

However, I did find things in the Michael Olaf catalog and Montessori from the Start that I disagree with, vehemently...mainly regarding breastfeeding. They say to wean at a very young age and not allow comfort sucking. Also, they seem to be against baby wearing and co-sleeping. I think this is a big flaw in their understanding of MM, who in my opinion always emphasized the biological norm. Early weaning and separation from mother is not normal!

Another thing about Olaf...their prices are not good at all. You can find the same products for a lot cheaper elsewhere. (E.g. the Radio Flyer walker wagon is about $40 cheaper on Amazon.)

My MIL ordered us a bunch of stuff from the Montessori Warehouse. That's a great site. The materials were beautiful and inexpensive.
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#13 of 14 Old 01-21-2009, 04:42 PM
 
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mizznicole,

I agree you can find cheaper prices than michael olaf. I do love all the info in their catalogues, though.

And as someone who is AMI trained from birth to three years, I also agree that MM was not suggesting weaning early or encouraging so much independance that babywearing and co-sleeping do not fit in. My first sling was actually given to me by another student in my 2nd yr of training when I found out I was pregnant with #1.

We definitely learned about the sensitive period of weaning, but weaning was used as a term meaning the introduction of solid foods in addition to breastfeeding. Weaning is a long, drawn out process that starts the moment your LO first has a taste of food.

My trainers (again, this is AMI so Maria Montessori's philosophy to the truest form) talked about the family bed and different cultures. But that in our country, it's more likely that parents will want baby in another room :, so a floor bed is ideal over a cage aka crib

RE: babywearing, it was expressed that the infant have plenty of time to have freedom of movement on the floor out of any kind of containers, including a carrier. But that the most important thing was still attachment with thier primary caregiver(s). so that they would feel trusting and safe enough to explore their environment.

Also, following the need of the child, of course, is the most important thing to remember. SO, if that need includes lots of holding, comfort, babywearing, co-sleeping, nursing for comfort, etc., then that should be followed.

The thing that changes it up a bit is when you are applying M principles in a group childcare setting (as where I worked) obvioulsy they end up being a bit more independant and are separated from their mother if she has to work or go to school.

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#14 of 14 Old 01-22-2009, 02:32 PM
 
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We instituted a lot we found in Montessori from the start- with the exception of of the issues already addressed regarding babywearing, breastfeeding, and co-sleeping. I think there was a lot of nice ideas in the book that we were able to use to help our daughter become attached and secure, but still develop a lot of independence and confidence (don't get me wrong -I do think the latter two stem from the former )
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