New to Montessori, could use your input! - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#31 of 37 Old 09-17-2010, 08:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
prettypixels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: MD
Posts: 2,835
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by GuildJenn View Post
Oh it's half random and half bad childhood experiences.

First, we do use strong cleaners on our toilet - for most of the house we're better environmentally but not for toilets; it's a dumb thing of mine. Anyways when my son was 3 he was helping me clean the bathroom and flicked the brush so that the cleaner/germs went into his hair, so I said we'd better wait. He asked how old he had to be so I randomly said 8. Now it's kind of a joke.

Second, when I was 7 my job was cleaning the bathroom and I managed to mix bleach and ammonia and gave myself what family legend calls chemical pneumonia (a trip to the ER and oxygen, at least). My mother was the kind of mother that went ballistic on Saturday berating everyone for being pigs and cleaning was - fraught. So I have this hangup about kids and cleaning products and not forcing responsibility too early.

...which makes Montessori a healthy BUT ironic choice for our family. But in my defense, my son helps with tons and tons of other things. Just not bathroom cleanser things.



This is really making me want to go observe my son's school because although as I said it can be a bit slow at the start compared to later, I don't think it's quite so rigid or - something. I can ask.
OK! I am so sorry you found out the hard way about bleach and ammonia, that must have been horrid for you!!!

I think I may ask if I can observe another classroom. I don't know if they would want me to observe hers right now. I just want to get a feel for it, you know?
prettypixels is offline  
#32 of 37 Old 09-17-2010, 08:50 PM
 
lach's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: MA
Posts: 2,042
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
There's a really nice little pamphlet called "A Parent's Guide to the Montessori Classroom." You might want to see if your school has it so you can borrow it. I think that it might answer a lot of your questions.

My daughter just completed her first full week. They started 4 of the new kids last Thursday, then the other 4 on Friday. This week, the older kids started. Transition seems to have gone rather smoothly.

Every day, DD says she didn't do any work. She gives me a play by play of what the guinea pig did, though. But I talked to her teacher who said that she's been observing a lot of lessons but for the most part is just an observer with the activity type lessons. She's apparently really into the practical life stuff, and has been preparing the snacks almost every day this week, wiping down the tables, and cleaning the outside of the guinea pig aquarium. Today she informed me that someone else cleaned it, and the guinea pig didn't like it.

I think that Montessori can seem to move slowly, but there is a method to the madness. If I sent her to a more conventional preschool, I'd probably be pretty annoyed that they had her doing the janitorial work! Cooking and cleaning is familiar to her, so I think she has attached to it in the classroom. I know her personality, and it always takes her a while to warm up to things. She is an observer, and jumps in only when she is ready. And then she's the life of the party. She's that cliche child who walked late, but never fell, talked late and was speaking in sentences within a few weeks, and she's the same way with smaller milestones. She took a dance class last year and spent 3 weeks just standing there watching as everyone else ran around and danced... but at the recital she was the only one in her class who danced and didn't just stand there like a deer in the headlights.

I really like that Montessori lets children move as slowly as they want to. Montessori is "child led" in that the child moves at her own pace through the curriculum: sometimes very slowly, sometimes mastering things very quickly. But it's still a set curriculum that the child is supposed to follow. There are 3+ levels of activity for most of the skills, and the child is supposed to master each step before she moves on. A good Montessori teacher will recognize when the child has mastered the skill AND is ready to move on (and these don't always happen at the same moment: sometimes the child is still happy playing at the mastered skill and isn't quite ready for the next step) and then swoop in with the next lesson.

The book that I recommended (which is really just a pamphlet) outlines all that. It's a quick read, but I thought that it explained a lot about how and why things work. Both of the Montessori schools that we applied to sent it to us.

Also, I think that while naptime is a state mandated thing, I think that it is a Montessori thing for only the oldest kids to stay for the full day. Both of the schools I'm familiar with are like that. I think they do more kindergarten level work in the afternoon, and the smaller class size allows more individualized instruction for the more complicated tasks. A friend who went to a Montessori school told me that it was a huge honor when you got asked to stay the full day because it meant you were one of the big kids and got to do more advanced work.

Trying to live a simple life in a messy house in a complicated world with : DH, DD (b. 07/07), DS (b. 02/09), and DD (b. 10/10)
lach is offline  
#33 of 37 Old 09-17-2010, 10:24 PM
 
MattBronsil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by prettypixels View Post
Thank you! This is exactly what I have been getting at. They have a section they can use; it's like lacing beads, a few puzzles, and some little plasticy things that stick together. I can't think of the name, but kind of circular with notches in so you can build stuff with them. Plus they can color and do playdough. And now my girl can use a strawberry huller to move little balls from a bowl into a plate. Which I understand is a good pre-writing skill, but... I mean it just seems kinda boring to me.
Haha. It would be boring to us. realize, though, that there is a big difference between an adult's work and a child's work. Children work to develop inner, more hidden aims. The work reflects the child's inner need for order, concentration, and focus. Adults work just to get done with a task.
MattBronsil is offline  
#34 of 37 Old 10-14-2010, 05:01 PM
 
carmel23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 5,218
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
PrettyPixels How is your little girl doing? Has she adjusted? Getting enough lessons, etc?

 hh2.gif  ~~~~~~~~~~hh2.gif
 

carmel23 is offline  
#35 of 37 Old 11-11-2010, 06:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
prettypixels's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: MD
Posts: 2,835
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by carmel23 View Post

PrettyPixels How is your little girl doing? Has she adjusted? Getting enough lessons, etc?


Carmel thank you for asking!  She still love love loves her school!  I go to observe tomorrow.  My husband was there today and enjoyed watching.  She has done sandpaper letters, pink tower, brown stair, among lots of others, of course!  I don't think she is bored academically now but I have some concerns about her socially.  Actually I guess my concern is more with the Montessori idea of "let the kids work it out" extending to social interaction... have any of you had any problems with that? 

 

I'll report back after tomorrow. smile.gif

prettypixels is offline  
#36 of 37 Old 11-13-2010, 01:46 PM
 
carmel23's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 5,218
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by prettypixels View Post



Quote:
Originally Posted by carmel23 View Post

PrettyPixels How is your little girl doing? Has she adjusted? Getting enough lessons, etc?


Carmel thank you for asking!  She still love love loves her school!  I go to observe tomorrow.  My husband was there today and enjoyed watching.  She has done sandpaper letters, pink tower, brown stair, among lots of others, of course!  I don't think she is bored academically now but I have some concerns about her socially.  Actually I guess my concern is more with the Montessori idea of "let the kids work it out" extending to social interaction... have any of you had any problems with that? 

 

I'll report back after tomorrow. smile.gif



There is a method to "letting the kids work it out," and at our school there is huge emphasis on being polite and social graces, and teaching empathy. 

 

Usually there is a resolution table, and the kids are instructed and guided in how to express their feelings and resolve an issue.  Much better then "time outs" IMHO. 

 

I think the best indication of if a child is learning is if they love school.  I'm so glad everything is working out!  My DD loves her school, too. hearts.gif


 hh2.gif  ~~~~~~~~~~hh2.gif
 

carmel23 is offline  
#37 of 37 Old 11-14-2010, 12:07 AM
 
MattBronsil's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 1,350
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'd see what they say at the parent night for now.  There are a few thoughts:

 

--I remember telling my parents I did "nothing" all day.  They knew better, of course.  :-)

--I wholeheartedly disagree that a child shouldn't touch anything before they had a lesson on it.  I used to agree with it, but not any more.  Still, it's a common debate in the Montessori world.  I side more with observation, which is the key to Montessori.  See what the child does with the material.  A child might not be ready for counting the bead chain, but what an amazing practical life skill with fine motor practice to hang it back up.  That said, there might be a limitation if the 3 year old is trying to take all the bead chains to the rug.  That can get messy. :-)

MattBronsil is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off