2011 Montessori homeschooling thread - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 15 Old 02-01-2011, 06:23 PM - Thread Starter
 
Rose-Roget's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'm not a regular visitor to this group, but I wanted to start a new thread to keep the ideas coming! 

 

For those looking to homeschool their school-aged child, I wanted to let you know that Montessori For Everyone (www.montessoriforeveryone.com) has free monthly workplans by grade level. thumb.gif    Might really help guide programming!

Rose-Roget is offline  
#2 of 15 Old 02-02-2011, 12:50 PM
 
AllyRae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Ohio
Posts: 6,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Great idea for a thread!

 

I was active in the previous thread, but I haven't been on MDC much lately due to having too much stuff going on.  But I'm here.  I also blog about our montessori homeschooling at my blog (Barefoot in Suburbia...link in my profile). :)


~Brandon Michael (11/23/03), Jocelyn Lily Nữ (2/4/07, adopted 5/28/07 from Vietnam), Amelia Rylie (1/14/09), & Ryland Josef William (9/7/05-9/7/05 @ 41 wks). 
AllyRae is offline  
#3 of 15 Old 02-03-2011, 04:01 PM
 
Aeress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Neat the Shores of Lake Erie
Posts: 6,506
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I have been busy making, collecting, purchasing materials.

 


Dhjammin.gif, Me knit.gif, DD 10 REPlaySkateboard04HL.gif, DD 7 cat.gif, DD 4 joy.gif

We reading.gif, homeschool.gif, cold.gif, eat.gif, sleepytime.gif not in that order

Aeress is offline  
#4 of 15 Old 02-16-2011, 09:49 PM
 
zebaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Any suggestions for getting 4 y.o. DS to sit down for activities? He had been willing to sit at the table and read / do activities for an hour or more at a time. Lately, all he's wanted to do is play with his action figures / dolls / stuffy toys. I'm not sure if the change has come about because it's winter and he's got a little cabin fever and just wants to play. I totally believe in play, however, it seems like now that I'm starting to become more organized with activities, he's pushing away. I'll give it a little more time before I jump to conclusions, but just thought I'd ask all of you in case you have any ideas for helping your kids get focused and/or motivating kids to do the montessori activities.


kathyhola.gif : , proud mama to seansuperhero.gif (12/06) and wife to zane reading.gif : cat.gif

zebaby is offline  
#5 of 15 Old 02-17-2011, 10:26 AM - Thread Starter
 
Rose-Roget's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by zebaby View Post

Any suggestions for getting 4 y.o. DS to sit down for activities?
 

 

I'll be interested in seeing the answers for this.  I would think that looking at his shifting interests may indicate a different sensitive period of some sort. Not sure what kinds of works he's been doing, but maybe shaking things up and doing some more sciency, music, art type works would (or something you haven't been doing as much of) might be interesting to him.

Rose-Roget is offline  
#6 of 15 Old 02-18-2011, 06:15 PM
 
zebaby's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Chicago
Posts: 511
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

He had been really into mazes and getting into learning to write his letters, practicing drawing, reading card games, and in general reading books. He still has moments when all he wants me to do is read to him, but he's just really into the action figures and creating scenarios or "movies" as he likes to call them. I guess I can roll with it and take pictures of each "scene", take his dictation of what's happening in the "movie" and create a little book for him. Not sure how that would fit into a Montessori plan, but it would be fun!


kathyhola.gif : , proud mama to seansuperhero.gif (12/06) and wife to zane reading.gif : cat.gif

zebaby is offline  
#7 of 15 Old 02-26-2011, 05:12 PM
 
MommaLura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: North Florida
Posts: 168
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I'm looking at getting started. Still trying to plan and balance, but I look forward to the journey.


Mama to Noah (3) and Rebekah (09/2/10) femalesling.GIF
MommaLura is offline  
#8 of 15 Old 02-27-2011, 10:51 AM
 
lflannery's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

My daughter is in a Montessori school and we love it (she's in the 3-6) however with 3 kids we are having trouble imagining paying for it past K. I'm hoping to get some advise on homeschooling. Does it make sense to send them to Primary (3-6) and then take them home (or to public) for 1st grade? I would love advise.

lflannery is offline  
#9 of 15 Old 03-01-2011, 05:37 AM
 
Rebecca2009's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 72
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

From what I gather, Montessori is for younger children (age 12 and under.

Am I right  (excuse my lack of punctuation, my son got at my keyboard......


Mom of 6 and a new grandma.  Mom to a sweet boy with autism. Jesus is the love and the light of my lifestillheart.gif
homeschool.gif ribbonjigsaw.gifgrouphug.gifreading.gifwhale.giftea6.gif

Rebecca2009 is offline  
#10 of 15 Old 03-01-2011, 08:03 AM
 
AllyRae's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Ohio
Posts: 6,391
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Actually, Montessori can be through high school.  Most schools have a stop point that is less than that though--many schools are only pre-k-kindy and some stop at 8th grade.  But there is actually a Montessori curriculum that goes all the way through high school--it's more "farm/fields based" than academic based--at least the original one is.  But one can theoretically do Montessori all the way through school. :)


We homeschool my daughters, but my son goes to a pre-k through 8th grade Montessori school due to his autism (and the fact the state pays for him to attend).  Honestly, I really love his 1st-3rd grade Montessori curriculum, and would find a lot of it hard to replicate at home.  A lot of the primary stuff is easy enough to replicate at home, but once you hit that lower elementary level, a lot of it is based on group work/group lessons, and a whole heck of a lot of 3 part cards/mini books/etc.  I definitely think the lower el is worth it.  The things my son is learning due to the Montessori curriculum are amazing...I think a lot of it was stuff I had trouble grasping even in upper elementary, but the Montessori method breaks the concepts down to something that is easily grasped for a 1st grader.


~Brandon Michael (11/23/03), Jocelyn Lily Nữ (2/4/07, adopted 5/28/07 from Vietnam), Amelia Rylie (1/14/09), & Ryland Josef William (9/7/05-9/7/05 @ 41 wks). 
AllyRae is offline  
#11 of 15 Old 03-01-2011, 04:09 PM
 
EAVice's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: South Carlolina
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Our family has chosen to do Montessori in a homeschool collective.  I am the primary guide to a group of 7 children ranging in age from 6 to 14.  The oldest two are my children.  They have been educated in a Montessori environment since they were 3.  In our area, as they out grew their present school, there were no viable options in a Montessori setting. We did it with one other child last year.  His family and another family were so impressed with the work the children were able to produce and their general peacefulness within them selves, that they decided to join. It is possible.  It requires good planning and a clearly focused purpose.  As with anything, one can loose one's way, so self-examination is a must.  I've found that blogging has helped me keep focused and thoughtful. My boys wouldn't change their education for anything. 

EAVice is offline  
#12 of 15 Old 03-06-2011, 05:32 AM
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 4,722
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Our Montessori school goes up to 8th grade,but financially we can not really afford it anymore.Maybe one more year for both of our kids resulting in dd leaving at the end of  6th and ds at 4th. Glad to see others have done M at home for older kids,because I just see for little ones mostly.

mattemma04 is offline  
#13 of 15 Old 03-14-2011, 03:40 PM
 
Aeress's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Neat the Shores of Lake Erie
Posts: 6,506
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)


Quote:
Originally Posted by EAVice View Post

Our family has chosen to do Montessori in a homeschool collective.  I am the primary guide to a group of 7 children ranging in age from 6 to 14.  The oldest two are my children.  They have been educated in a Montessori environment since they were 3.  In our area, as they out grew their present school, there were no viable options in a Montessori setting. We did it with one other child last year.  His family and another family were so impressed with the work the children were able to produce and their general peacefulness within them selves, that they decided to join. It is possible.  It requires good planning and a clearly focused purpose.  As with anything, one can loose one's way, so self-examination is a must.  I've found that blogging has helped me keep focused and thoughtful. My boys wouldn't change their education for anything. 


We are starting a group for young kids 3-6 next year. I am getting ready now for next fall and yes, it takes a lot of work. I am hoping to keep adding to it as the children grow.

 


Dhjammin.gif, Me knit.gif, DD 10 REPlaySkateboard04HL.gif, DD 7 cat.gif, DD 4 joy.gif

We reading.gif, homeschool.gif, cold.gif, eat.gif, sleepytime.gif not in that order

Aeress is offline  
#14 of 15 Old 04-19-2011, 04:00 PM
 
BellyBean's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 934
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Hi, I am new to this forum, please forgive me if I phrase things incorrectly.  I recently came across Montessori and decided it would fit my 18 month old DD (and my) lifestyle/personalities well.  I am having a hard time finding information on infant/toddler Montessori homeschooling activities, and would love it if anyone had suggestions or links.  I have started incorporating things as I find them, but I am not sure if I am doing things in the "right" order. 

 

So far we do:

As much outdoor activities as possible, walking and discovering/touching things.

Started practicing scooping/pouring - but sometimes she tries to eat/drink the materials :)

I bought a big bead lacing set (not opened, it says 3+ but I was thinking about using it now?)

DD loves wooden puzzles (not sure if that's montessori), I got her some shape pattern puzzles, but they also say 3+

Lots of reading

Play doh (again not sure it's really montessori)

 

Things I want to do from reading a few posts here today:

Sensory box with different "feeling" things. 

Color box(es) for sorting

Need to find my shape sorter DH "put away"

 

Please, any ideas are welcome...hopefully I can contribute to the group more when I get my feet under me a little :)  I wish there was a book that had lots of activities by age and explaination of what each activity developes (maybe there is?) 


cd.gif  love.gif(DD1 Oct 2009),  angel1.gif (2011) ,  twins.gif (DD2 and DD3 June 2012)

 

BellyBean is offline  
#15 of 15 Old 04-20-2011, 10:47 AM - Thread Starter
 
Rose-Roget's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

BellyBean,  Those are good early childhood activities.  I think in the really young years, Montessori philosophy fosters exploration and independence as much as possible.  Some additional things I do with my little one are ring sets, early sorting/categorizing (shape, color - but it's still pretty early), rhythms with music, and books (of course).  I also rotate the toys so she doesn't get bored.  :)

 

Rose-Roget is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off