Daughter starting Montessori next month - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 5 Old 08-19-2011, 04:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
mommypants13's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: New London CT
Posts: 7
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Hello!

My 2 year old daughter will be starting a montessori school next month, I was wondering what affordable things I can to do adapt my home for her. 


We currently live with roommates who don't have a kid (moving soon I hope) any suggestions? I'm new to this, whole montessori thing so I'd love some suggestions

mommypants13 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 5 Old 08-23-2011, 04:56 AM
 
happy*mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Undisclosed
Posts: 91
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Hello, I think autonomy is the key.  Give your child plenty of opportunities to do things herself.  This can be accomplished without any additional costs.  Some of the things we have done:  Low bookshelves for books & toys, a bed that allows your child to get in and out herself, storing her clothes at a height and in a way that she can access them herself and work on learning how to dress herself, a child size table and chairs, keeping a stool and toilet seat setup at the toilet, removing clutter and non-child essential items.  my child has just climbed into my lap,so can'y type more, hopr that helps. :)


sahm dishes.gif wife to dh, AP mama to most amazing boy eat.gif 07/2009!  and 11 chickens chicken3.gif   caffix.gif   goorganic.jpg    bf.jpg  NOTV

 

happy*mama is offline  
#3 of 5 Old 09-11-2011, 06:23 AM
 
sbarr_NY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 137
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Completely agree with Happymama - Other things - putting a hook or cubbie at the front door so child knows to put belongings away immediately on entering the house (roommates can only appreciate a child who puts things away).  Can your child help put groceries or clean dishes away?  Anything you can do that encourages her to "do for herself".  Clothes get put in hamper or basket.  Not sure if you recycle, but sorting is a great activity for toddlers.  I remember when my daughter was < 2 years, she taught herself how to recycle.  I have to admit, in hindsight, it was pretty funny.  My ex had just finished a soda, put it on TV tray next to couch.  LIndsey walked by, grabbed it took it to the kitchen.  Curious, I followed her, and she put it in the glass and plastic recycling bin, not the trash.  She also did the same with paper recyclables, which I had to be pretty careful, especially when I found my checkbook in the recycling bin.

 

It's amazing what kids can do - never under-estimate their capabilities (they're limited to body size, physical strength, experience).  My little one loved to vacuum, sweep although for some reason she didn't like to mop.  If she spills something, it's her job to clean it up.  Of course, I usually had to help, but the immediate reaction was:  OK, let's clean it up, can you go get the dustpan?  Or, let's pick that up and you can put it in the trash.

 

I'm probably overly simplistic, but I do not think there is anything a child cannot do within the realms of stirring, sorting, cleaning, folding clothes, putting things away.  I'll leave it to the teachers to show her how to do the pink tower or sand letters or counting beads.  My job is to prime her to be a confident and responsible child who takes care of her own belongings, puts things away, participates in household activities, is curious about the world.  Bonus here - makes my life easier when Lindsey puts her own stuff away.  When there is a hook at child level, there is no excuse NOT to put one's coat away.  Tucked away in a high closet, the child relies on you to do what he/she could independently. Stool to reach the counter or toilet, perhaps a low cupboard to put away some dishes.  I've gotten to the point where everything we do at home, I think about how Lindsey might be able to do it herself.  :)

sbarr_NY is offline  
#4 of 5 Old 09-11-2011, 07:02 PM
 
happy*mama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Undisclosed
Posts: 91
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Great points sbarr.  My ds has been doing all of these things for more than a year (he is 25 mos).  He loves to recycle and sort the trash and compost.  And I agree that most household chores/tasks can be accomplished by a child.  Adult supervision/guidance is needed for safety for some things, but mostly we need patience when working with our children.  We should be there to guide them, but not become impatient and rush them for our own needs.  They will miss the magic of learning if we try to control the environment.  I am always thinking of ways to make our home more accessible to our son.  Financially and space-wise I am short of resources to do all that I would like, but I try to stick with the basics.   I don't need to duplicate the materials my son is using at school, instead I am focusing on our entryway and a self care place for him in the bathroom.  I would like to work on an area in the kitchen for him to get his own snacks and drinks as well.  Paring down our stuff and my urge to "go and do" is my other current task.  I am reading Simplicity Parenting to help with this.


sahm dishes.gif wife to dh, AP mama to most amazing boy eat.gif 07/2009!  and 11 chickens chicken3.gif   caffix.gif   goorganic.jpg    bf.jpg  NOTV

 

happy*mama is offline  
#5 of 5 Old 09-12-2011, 07:14 PM
 
sbarr_NY's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 137
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

That is a great book - I completely enjoyed it.  It reminded me about being mindful with my daughter.  I thought back - early childhood, what are some of the things I remember:  a certain doll (no!) or crawling through the iris bed on my hands and knees, wondering if anyone would find me.  Most of my early childhood memories were about outside - gardening, climbing a tree, crawling through an Iris bed.

 

Another book that greatly influenced me is:  Loving Logic - very much empowering children to make choices at a very young age.  Simplistic example:  "Time to clean up (factual.,. non-negotiable statement) - shower or bath?" - Give the child a choice (either is acceptable to you - you want the child clean), they're empowered.  I think it greatly complements the Montessori philosophyl

 

As far as resources, I have bought 2 things for my daughter - a low shelf and a rack with hanging bins.  That's it - everything else is from elsewhere in the house and is her level.

 

i completely agree about the entryway and self-care in bathroom, that's great.  In hindsight, I wish I had bought a side by side fridge so Lindsey could reach whatever I put at her level.  Amazingly enough, she's pretty darn resourceful, pulling a step stool (birch that I found on ebay) up to the fridge, opening it and getting out what she wants.  There are times I've been at the computer and she's brought a glass and bottle of carrot orange juice. 

 

I honestly don't think there is anything a child cannot do within parameters of:  height, strength, experience and trial and error.  It does not have to be expensive, just accessible.  Putting away the child's dishes is free, recycling is free, yard work is free, looking at the moon move across the sky is free... most of what we teach our children is free.

 

I'll be darned if I'm going to buy counting beads, but Lindsey will know how to pull weeds, herd our "illegal" city chickens back in their part of the yard, give the cat his wet "stinky" food, put her clothes in the laundry, help fold towels.  There is so much in life to learn - so many things to master, I'll never get there, but my goal is that by the time she's 18, Lindsey is ready to leave home to either learn a vocation, go to college.

sbarr_NY is offline  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off