Montessori and early reading.... - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 7 Old 05-05-2006, 03:14 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi all.....I know a little about Montessori and phonics etc....just a little though. My daughter is 3 1/2 and is incredibly interested in reading and letters. Last night she asked dh to teach her how to read. I want to encourage her bc she's so interested, but I don't want to buy a leap pad-- Kwim. So how do I go about teaching her some simple phonics the MOntessori way? Any suggestions. Thanks.
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#2 of 7 Old 05-08-2006, 04:53 PM
 
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Hi! This is a great age to start the sound games and the sandpaper letters. You can get complete activities and also developmental information in the book:
Montessori Read and Write : A Parent's Guide to Literacy for Children by Lynne Lawrence.
It is rather long and detailed to explain all the indirect and direct preparations for writing and reading that the child experiences in the toddler room and children's house (not all covered in book mentioned above). Also, one could never duplicate the quantity of lessons that are given from child to child (direct and indirect) and how this entices the child to repeat so often the movements that will build muscular memory and enable such ease in cursive writing and reading that is obtained through Montessori. It really doesn't make a whole lot of sense to set up so many materials just for one child and besides s/he would be a whole lot happier sharing them all with other children. It might also be helpful for you to observe at a children's house if you are going to go ahead with this method.

My sweetie and I have a lovely little lady 07/02 and 3 cats
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#3 of 7 Old 05-08-2006, 05:02 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Lillianna, Thanks so much for your response. I'll check out that book.
For now, we cannot do Montessori schools bc of the cost---I even toured two schools, but my jaw broke when I saw the price. What I saw was amazing!
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#4 of 7 Old 05-08-2006, 05:53 PM
 
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My dd is almost four and has mastered letter sounds but isn't quite at a reading level. at her school they have a series of book called "BOB" books and there are three levels. We bought the first level at Borders on Friday and within the first set there are twleve books that are grouped in three colors with four books in each group. The children are introduced to each letter sound (except Q I think it says) throughout the series. At the beginning of each book they show which letter sounds are introduced and associate them with a word A=Apple, T=Table, etc. So that way the child can make a connection. Low and behold since dd could identify all three sounds in the first book she actually read it...pretty cool.

Maybe those will help for you guys too, good luck!
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#5 of 7 Old 05-16-2006, 02:13 PM
 
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My sons M. teacher taught this pre-reading game they do in class - letter sounds and words... (He is 3.5)

The game is similar to eye spy and you can start simply and make it more challenging as she gets the hang of it:

Get an object in your hand; pen, ball, paper, green pepper, carrot [if you play the game while you are cooking, veggies are handy...]

For example you are holding a ball
I spy something in my hand that starts with buh (b) - do not say the letter b, say the sound of the letter b - buh buh.

And your child should guess it and they learn to connect the sound of the letter with objects.

To advance the game, hold an object in each hand (presumably two objects that start with different letters ) so they actually have to guess which object starts with the letter you are sounding.

You can play this game very casually, anytime, while you cook (use food items), while you are walking to the park (pick up nature items on the way ... stick and grass)

Eventually this ties / helps with reading.

Sara - Mum to C (10/02) ; m/c 10/07; 7/08; 3/09; Lucy Olive Feb 28, 2010 !
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#6 of 7 Old 05-22-2006, 05:17 AM
 
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Is it worthwhile buying a set of sandpaper letters and a movable alphabet? (I'm not a very crafts person so doubt I could make them very well). And what are the best kind of sandpaper letters to get, print or cursive? Here in Europe, children tend to learn cursive first so I am wondering if it does not make more sense to get the cursive letters... But then again, for reading, books tend to be in print so maybe getting the print letters is better?

Any advice much appreciated.

Roman Goddess, mom to J (August 2004) and J (April 2009).    h20homebirth.gif signcirc1.gif
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#7 of 7 Old 05-22-2006, 02:37 PM
 
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The sandpaper letter lessons start around 3 and the moveable alphabet starts about 3.5. There are some direct and indirect preparations that are done before the initial lessons to help insure success. Of course, the child in the Casa has been observing others with these materials so has already had an indirect introduction. The sound games (there are 5) are essential for success with SP Letters and M. Alpha.
If you are doing Montessori in the home, it makes sense to purchase these materials, though I am not sure how much success you will have if they are only used by one or two children. The quantity of lessons a child receives from watching others and from direct lessons from another child are hard to duplicate in the home. Both of these materials are challenging to present, require developed sensitivity to the child's attitude and skills and need much, much repetition to achieve mastery.
If your child is going to be enrolled in a Children's House, let her do this type of work there. I had a couple children whose parents wanted to work with them at home and used these materials. Consequently, they didn't do much with these materials in the Casa.
In Montessori, SP Letters and M. Alpha. should always be presented in cursive. This is another point of departure for AMS. Children learn cursive effortlessly at this age. It is not difficult for them to read in print after learning to write in cursive.

My sweetie and I have a lovely little lady 07/02 and 3 cats
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