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MattBronsil 02-22-2008 10:33 PM

The other day, I said I was going to post an intro about myself and I never did. I ended up just not being able to stay awake any longer (it was late at night).

My name is Matt Bronsil. I grew up in the AMS world pretty much - both my parents are Montessori teachers and teacher trainers. I have managed to grow up around some wonderful people as a result.

My path didn't take me into teaching right away - I eventually ended up working in computers. I was building computers for a company when 9/11 happened. After that, large businesses did not invest in computers for a while and the company I worked for did not have enough orders to keep such a large staff. I got laid off. That is how I got into Montessori.

I am now currently teach in Taiwan and continually dive into Montessori reading and studying. I crave it. :

With that said, I am curious who you are. Let me know. I love getting to know more Montessori people.

Matt

Zadee 02-23-2008 12:02 AM

I went to an AMS school for their primary program and one year of lower elementary. I am a certified public secondary school teacher (Latin and English) When I went to look for schools for my kids I looked into Sudbury, Waldorf and Montessori and Montessori seemed the best fit. I walked into the school and pretty much fell in love and my "don't you dare be out of my sight" son loves it too. I knew my daughter would do fine - she is much more independent - but I was pleasantly surprised how easily he had taken to it.

MattBronsil 02-23-2008 12:42 AM

Glad to hear it is working out.

mightymoo 02-23-2008 01:10 AM

Well, I have no Montessori background myself, I went to public school where my mom was a Kindergarten teacher most of my life. She retired 2 years ago - she taught K a lot more like Montessori is taught though than some folks are teaching it now (like mini 1st grade).

I had read great things about Montessori when DD was a baby and when we moved here I heard great things about the M school in my town. I am a fairly intelligent person, but I always did mediocre in school, I was the kid who didn't fully 'apply' themselves, etc. I remember being told in Elementary school that I would have to be kept in from recess for things like not finishing my worksheet. I was a voracious reader and math has always just clicked for me, I think ultimately I was bored by the classroom. I'm by no means 'gifted' but the style of teaching just did not suit me. Once I left school and learning was something I did only for myself I rediscovered my love for it. Especially when it came down to learning how to best care for babies, then children and various different philosophies, etc.

DD might as well be my clone. I think she got my MILs teeth, but other than that, she looks exactly like me, and has the same personality. The same quirks my mother said I had when I was 4 - DD has them. So know her so well as I know myself, I knew Montessori would fit her perfectly and it has - we are halfway through our second year and thrilled. She is doing amazing. I do not want to have to put her in public school and we've discussed keeping her in at least through 3rd (which is as far as our M school goes now, though they want to do upper el)

I have been roped into being the President of the Parent's org for my M school. I don't mind volunteering, but its frustrating as we seem to have a very busy or less than enthusiastic parent community.

Flor 02-23-2008 02:07 AM

My turn? Ok, I went to pretty standard public schools as a kid. When I was about 13 I started to get really bored and disillusioned. I felt like I was a number and that I learned more at home reading books than in the classroom. My parents found a me a cool (not M) high school that was very individualized, small (40 kids), creative, and run by people who liked to take us out in to the world. When ds was born, I couldn't imagine him in public school. Oh, did I mention that I'm a public school teacher? I teach English to English Learners, grades 6-8 at a big, rowdy public middle school. I'm very turned off by the emphasis on standardized testing and how every educational desicion we make at my school is driven by our need to raise test scores. We have a little M school in town. Ages 2-15, just 40 kids total. I wasn't completely sold on the school just because it was Montessori. Really, had it been Waldorf, or anything else, I probably would have gone for it just because it was small, creative, happy, etc. But, it turns out that Montessori is a good fit for my self-conscious, careful little guy. The downside is that the school only has two teachers and, though I like the director, we do have our battles. Ds has been in Montessori for 1.5 years now. We plan to keep him there as long as he is happy and growing.

Are you from Taiwan?

teagansmama 02-23-2008 02:22 AM

I'm Jen and I have three children - two boys (9 and 8) and then Teagan who is almost 5.

I have done Montessori with all my children, the boys though only through the 2nd primary year. Both were diagnosed with autism and unfortunately where we lived, the Montessori's couldn't handle the diagnosis. They have gone into public school where they are now being pulled and home schooled, Montessori style.

Teagan has been in Montessori since she turned 2 and we plan to keep her in one at least through the Elementary years. We will reassess after that time to figure out where to go from there, with her input of course.

Right now she is getting ready for her last Primary year, the big "Kindergarten" year - she is one excited girl to be at the top of her class age wise. As in another post, we are on the hunt for the perfect Elementary program to continue with.

Montessori is very important to me because I feel children are naturally visual learners and they need to be given the freedom to discover the world around them, gain confidence in their abilities and have the love of learning. I am NOT a supporter of standardized tests, mass amounts of homework, etc. that the public system provides (thus the reason for home schooling the boys).... Montessori has given us and our children everything we have hoped for.

BCFD 02-23-2008 04:51 PM

I went to public school as a child and have fond memories of my elementary years. Middle and High school was pointless and I just remember hating being tied to a desk all day, copying notes, memorizing, and just barely scraping by with a B or C (putting in a *LOT* of study time). I am the mommy to 3 little girls (ages 3, 2, and 1) and knew I wanted something better for them. I have looked at every type of school - Waldorf, Co-op, Reggio, play based, School district preschool (which is actually a GREAT program), state preschool, Head Start (my girls were/are all in the Early Head Start home based program), and structured mommy groups (for socializing). They pretty much all had major problems and then I started looking into Montessori. For some reason, I put this off thinking that we could never afford it. I recently lucked out and found an INCREDIBLE school for my 3 year old and her first day was yesterday! She did fantastic and I am madly in love with the way this school is run and the personalities of the teachers. They are incredible people and they are teaching TRUE Montessori (they are all AMS trained and the owner belongs to AMI, but the school isn't affiliated with either).

Quote:
Montessori is very important to me because I feel children are naturally visual learners and they need to be given the freedom to discover the world around them, gain confidence in their abilities and have the love of learning. I am NOT a supporter of standardized tests, mass amounts of homework, etc. that the public system provides (thus the reason for home schooling the boys).... Montessori has given us and our children everything we have hoped for.
:

DaughterOfKali 02-23-2008 08:07 PM

I taught at a Montessori preschool. Although I can't afford to send my child to a Montessori school, I do like to have some Montessori materials around. Plus, I support my son to learn at his own pace and to respect others.

MattBronsil 02-24-2008 04:25 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Flor View Post

Are you from Taiwan?
I'm living in Taiwan. I am from Cincinnati. I've been in Taiwan for a year and a half.

Thanks to everyone who is posting their stories. I have read each one. Keep them coming

Matt

KBecks 02-24-2008 12:23 PM

I'm Karen, first-time Montessori mom. My oldest son, age 3, was just accepted to Montessori school and he will begin attending in fall. I'm going through the school handbook and tuition contract now.

I've enjoyed reading "A parent's guide to the Montesssori classroom" by Aline D. Wolf and am currently looking at "Montessori: The Science Behind the Genius".

I'm excited about trying Montessori and hope it's wonderful for our son. I have some anxieties about how everything will work out and how my son will respond to the structured environment, but we're optimistic that it will go well.

Added: I am particularly interested in M because I believe in individualized education experiences and because I have boys, I very much want them to have freedom and flexibility in their education. I especially like that they will be free to move around the classroom and not be forced to sit often.

DahliaRW 02-25-2008 03:54 AM

Like the PP, my son will start M in the fall. He turned three in January. I also have a younger son who is 7 months.

My mom is a librarian at a local M school that is preschool-8 grade. Not the one we're going too though (it's super expensive, requires full day for 4 yos, and I just don't like it as much as the one I chose). I talked to her a lot before choosing M for my son since she knows a ton about it and she knows my son and she felt it was a good match (as do I).

I went to public school K-12. I liked grade school, but by jr high and high school I felt like I was wasting my time most days. My dh felt the same way about school. I don't want that for my children. I'm not sure if we'll be able to afford to continue M beyond kindergarten, and if not I will most likely homeschool. I feel that a lot of M philosophy will yield well to homeschooling and prepare him.

chick 02-25-2008 09:51 AM

Hello!

I did my Internation Diploma in '94 and worked in a Montessori day nursery for 7 years. Wanted to work in a school but had a dd I needed to have in daycare and couldn't afford to work in a different school. Carrying on past 4yrs for her wasn't practical financially

dd2 goes to the same nursery as dd1 went to and is loving it so far though is only in the baby room at the moment! I am now a primary school teacher (mainstream) but there's a lot of my Montessori training in my teaching style! I'd like to think our home and parenting approach is quite Montessori - but I know there's stuff we do that would make MM turn in her grave!

nkm1968 02-25-2008 07:52 PM

I am a 2 time Montessori mom--dd2 is on three waiting lists for Montessori el (she is in her 4th preprimary year) and DD1 did 4 preprimary years as well and was in a Montessori elementary through 6th grade.

DH and I both endured 13 years of parochial school and absolutlely hated it and spent hours watching the clock slowly slowly move towards 3:15.....enduring memories of endless long division worksheets (for four years in a row!!) and copying paragraphs from really bad textbooks into notebooks prompted us to embrace progressive education, and here in Cleveland, Montessori is the only choice---we don't have Waldorf or Reggio or Sudbury here, just test-prep public, test-prep charters, parochial, totally expensive and really high pressure "independent" schools, and private Montessori.

So we ended up in Montessori, and we love it. I am on the board of DD2's Montessori preschool and am working on a "Year Round All Day Community" which will begin enrolling children in June (as a working mama, my one beef with Montessori is the dearth of good programming for all day kids, our school has 150 kids, of whom exactly 16 have working mamas, thus propogating the "Spa" myth of Montessori as an elitist experience for the affluent ONLY).

Please tell me that in Taiwan, Montessori is NOT only for part time (morning work cycle only) kids!!

lactivist 02-25-2008 09:33 PM

I am a brand new (just a few weeks) Montessori mom. I have four children 16, 10, almost 3 and 5 months. I have always homeschooled until my oldest went to 8th grade a couple years ago. She attends a public charter high school that suits her very well. My 10yo is homeschooled and loves it. My almost 3yo is another child entirely. We were doing pretty well until his sister came along and changed his world. We have really been struggling the past few months mainly because he is bored.

We started thinking about M schools (I believe in the philosophy) and got a lead on a small M preschool that is a perfect fit for him. This is his 3rd week and it will be his first full week. He has had a couple meltdowns when my dh drops him off but they stop instantly and he goes on to have a great day. He even went in underwear today which is a HUGE step for him.

I can't believe how this all worked out. I LOVE the place and the teachers and the attendance is low for now which is perfect for him to get started. I have a feeling he is really going to thrive there. His behavior has turned around 180 degrees at home. He was constantly attacking his 10yo brother and that has basically stopped. It all just proves to me that each child has their own needs and by following them I can help each of my children flourish in their own way.
Wendi

MattBronsil 02-27-2008 01:13 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by nkm1968 View Post
here in Cleveland, Montessori is the only choice
Cleveland, Ohio?

Drew Carry's hometown?

If so, ask around and see who knows Martha McDermott. She got Montessori started there back in the 1960's. She taught at Xavier University for years and I think she's still in Cincinnati. It's been a while since I kept up on that. One of the most fantastic ladies I have ever met.

Quote:

So we ended up in Montessori, and we love it. I am on the board of DD2's Montessori preschool and am working on a "Year Round All Day Community" which will begin enrolling children in June (as a working mama, my one beef with Montessori is the dearth of good programming for all day kids, our school has 150 kids, of whom exactly 16 have working mamas, thus propogating the "Spa" myth of Montessori as an elitist experience for the affluent ONLY).
In case you haven't heard, it's also "ONLY" for the poor people, brilliant children, special needs children, children who are self-motivated, children that can read, children that can't read, well-behaved children, obnoxious children, children that thrive in structure, children that can handle having no structure, children that don't like to play, and children that only want to play all day.

Yeah...we get all the stereotypes. Must mean we're fantastic for all children ;-).

Quote:
Please tell me that in Taiwan, Montessori is NOT only for part time (morning work cycle only) kids!!
No, but here we do have an opposite extreme of several parents that work too much.

Elementary is afternoon only. They have to go to the public schools in the morning. It really sets up its own set of challenges and I would love to see how Montessori schools handle it. Then they have so much homework that parents do not want them to do the Montessori stuff - they want a person sitting in a room full of children making sure they do their homework.

It is becoming more established here, thankfully. Montessori schools are now looking at plans on how to get Montessori into the public school here. Not an easy task by anyone's imagination.

Matt

MattBronsil 02-27-2008 01:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by lactivist View Post
It all just proves to me that each child has their own needs and by following them I can help each of my children flourish in their own way.
Wendi
Can Montessori be summed up any better than that line? Me thinketh not.

xumom 02-27-2008 10:56 PM

I have to come out of lurkdom for this thread! Going off your last name, Matt, I have heard your mother speak and she was amazing. I loved listening to her not just for her information on Montessori, but her parenting insights as well.

Okay, I will write up an intro as well since I am here! I was introduced to Montessori in college where several of my friends majored in Montessori education for both undergrad and graduate degrees. What they told me and what I saw about the philosophy stuck with me when I began researching preschools for my son, so I visited a few Montessori schools in the area (and there are a lot). I was blown away by what I saw at one school and knew I had to send my son there. The classrooms are amazing and the grounds surrounding the school are just as spectacular. He is now in his 3rd year (Kindergarten) and my 3 yo started this past fall. They are flourishing in the environment and we plan on sending them through the sixth grade. Not sure what to do beyond that, but we will cross that bridge when we get there.

wedgered2 02-28-2008 02:26 AM

I fell in love with Montessori 6 years ago. My children are now in upper el and lower el classrooms. We have moved a lot and it has always been a comfort to my kids that whether in america or overseas when they walk into a montessori classroom it is home to them.

we are now planting roots in tucson AZ and for the first time getting our kids a FREE education at a Montessori charter school! YEAH!!!!

My 9yo will be taking her first real test ever in april (those standardized tests? or something?) I am not worried at all. Montessori has been enriching not only to my children but to myself and DH as well. as our kids have gotten older, we now gloat over the "no homework" policy!

Anandamama 02-28-2008 03:32 AM

I trained at an AMI training school to teach 3-6 yr olds. I taught for five years, but felt I didn't have time to do other things that were important to me, and so left the job, even though I loved it. It was the the most gratifying job I've ever had, but also the most demanding, energy-wise. (I was also sick of school politics.) That was 13 years ago and since then I have worked as a sub at a few Montessori schools in my city. Now my first child is 1, and I'm suddenly having a resurgent interest in Montessori and thinking back fondly on my experience in the classroom. I'm looking into the options and really wishing we had Montessori charter schools here. I'm also indulging in a long-time fantasy of starting the "ideal", one-classroom Montessori school, free from blech bureaucracy.

MattBronsil 02-28-2008 04:00 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by xumom View Post
I have to come out of lurkdom for this thread! Going off your last name, Matt, I have heard your mother speak and she was amazing. I loved listening to her not just for her information on Montessori, but her parenting insights as well.
If it helps any, I was the most trying child she talked about. LOL

I love listening to my mom talk about her experiences. I used to wish she would stop talking about my brother and me. Now that he has 2 kids and they're the focus of what she talks about, I'm jealous.

Your name is xumom. Are you from Cincinnati? Do you go to Xavier? Do your children go to Xavier? What's the connection to "XU?" (Just an assumption that it's Xavier)

If you don't want to answer, that's fine. If you want to answer in Private Message, that's fine too. Just curious.

Quote:
Okay, I will write up an intro as well since I am here! I was introduced to Montessori in college where several of my friends majored in Montessori education for both undergrad and graduate degrees. What they told me and what I saw about the philosophy stuck with me when I began researching preschools for my son, so I visited a few Montessori schools in the area (and there are a lot). I was blown away by what I saw at one school and knew I had to send my son there. The classrooms are amazing and the grounds surrounding the school are just as spectacular. He is now in his 3rd year (Kindergarten) and my 3 yo started this past fall. They are flourishing in the environment and we plan on sending them through the sixth grade. Not sure what to do beyond that, but we will cross that bridge when we get there.

You have time to figure it out. Chances are, his friends will be going somewhere and that may decide where to send your child. You'll have to work that out when the time comes.

Until then, I'm glad to hear you found a great school.

Matt

MattBronsil 02-28-2008 04:01 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Anandamama View Post
I'm also indulging in a long-time fantasy of starting the "ideal", one-classroom Montessori school, free from blech bureaucracy.
We all hope to be free from bureaucracy.

KathinJapan 02-28-2008 11:15 PM

Hi my daughter is just finishing up her first year at M preschool. She loves it but the reality of her older friends leaving and going to 1st grade is hitting her hard, esp. one boy she is very close to...

I also went to Montessori, in Columbus OH. St. Mary`s if anybody else is out there... it was a great experience for me. I have no fond memories of 3rd grade, which is when I had to switch to a regular elm. school.

in Japan, all the preschools are half day. There is aftercare, but some M. schools don`t offer it.

Kathryn

dready_betty 02-29-2008 01:17 AM

Hello, fellow Montessori enthusiasts! My name is Anna and I have recently re-discovered Montessori, as a teacher-to-be. I attended Montessori Primary 20 years ago (I'm 23 now), "grew up", went to college and earned a degree in Environmental Studies. My dream of becoming an organic farmer hasn't worked out too well, so I have been further exploring my other passion, which is working with kids! I am currently substitute teaching in public schools - all ages and subjects but mostly special ed. I love the kids but have been really disturbed by a lot of things I saw going on academically and bureaucratically...in other words, things the adults, not the kids, were doing. Anyways, I started to read about Montessori (hence the "rediscovering") and fell in love! I have recently applied to AMS teacher training for Primary...and I haven't been this excited about anything in a really long time. Everything I have read about in my many Montessori books (currently reading and loving "Montessori: The Science Behind the Genius") reflects what I believe as a student and a teacher, a longtime babysitter, and a future parent.

My current obsession is the concept of the Erdkinder, Dr. Montessori's farm run by the teenagers...the book I mentioned above has a brief bit on it, but not a lot. Anyone know of some good explanations/resources for more info on this? Or anyone had experience with an actual school doing this?

Freedom72 03-01-2008 07:17 PM

Hi Matt, I haven't been on her for FOREVER, but I am AMS trained in 6-9, though I hope to start AMI training THIS SUMMER! I am the director of a Montessori Charter School program in California, which Istarted 3 years ago because when I moved to this area, there were no Montessori schools and I saw my youngest daughter struggling in traditional. I was working at an independent study charter, asked my boss if I could start a Montessori Academy, and whalla...it was born!

We are very funky in that the students attend school 3 days and homeschool 2 days. I know even the AMI purists have been scratching their heads, as Maria never did say that school had to be 5 days a week, nor did anyone else, for that matter, so this is quite a paradigm shift. I have teachers who are AMS trained, AMI trained, and a couple of online training folks who were apprentices to us and came on because it is VERY hard to find someone who has a CA teaching credential AND Montessori experience.

Funny enough, I have one AMS trained teacher who is the most "traditional" teacher I have (and I am gently shifting her to my vision of the philosophy), and one teacher who is just getting her training, but has the spirit that I am looking for. So, her math presentations are more traditional because she is still learning the materials, but she really allows the students to pursue their own interests.

We have students in grades K-7 (soon to be grade 8), and a thriving community of 135 students currently. We have grades 1-3 together, grades 4-6 (with 2 seventh graders because we plan to add a middle school next year and wanted to allow them to stay for that), but Kinder is by themselves because CA law in public school does not allow preschool to be attached to Kindergarten...though that might soon change.

This has been a very big endeavor, my life's work, I suppose. I feel that I was called to bring this to this area of the world, where people are so traditional in their views (I'm in southern cal, but not in the most progressive part of the world). I was talking to an AMI teacher from Texas the other day, who just may come and join us for our middle school classroom next year. I explained to him that, on the continuum, we are not where is school is, or where we want to be, and yet we are so far from where many of these students came from, in traditional settings.

I hear horror story after horror story all of the time about the punishments/rewards, the high pressure, the timed testing, etc. We may not have a 3 hour work cycle, but we have a 2 hour one ( because we share the building with another program and have to schedule lunch in a certain manner...but next year we get our own building....yaay! . My teachers might not all have the best training from the most amazing centers, but they allow the students to work at their own pace, offer a variety of lessons, and create enjoyable environments where the students are happy and thriving.

We just had a poetry jam yesterday, where students who chose to do so presented works of poetry to an audience...it was grand. I am trying like heck to get away from this area because I'm a hippie/earthy gal, living in a place that sometimes feels like a foreign land, and I feel that I have one more year, and I hope that I can again start a school in an area where I would more like to live. Also, I am a single parent, and am tired of being on my own, would like to find someone to share my life with, and that is NOT happening in this neck of the woods, where it is quite conservative and so forth... .

Yes this is long, but I type as fast as I think... .

Letty
PS..Matt...I have a myspace, though nothing really about my work, more my personal life..I'm gonna look you up!

MattBronsil 03-02-2008 05:44 AM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freedom72 View Post
I hear horror story after horror story all of the time about the punishments/rewards, the high pressure, the timed testing, etc. We may not have a 3 hour work cycle, but we have a 2 hour one ( because we share the building with another program and have to schedule lunch in a certain manner...but next year we get our own building....yaay! . My teachers might not all have the best training from the most amazing centers, but they allow the students to work at their own pace, offer a variety of lessons, and create enjoyable environments where the students are happy and thriving.
That is all we can do. That and keep working to make it better.

Quote:
PS..Matt...I have a myspace, though nothing really about my work, more my personal life..I'm gonna look you up!

Great I have not logged on in a while. I am very busy lately. I need to blog again soon. Miss it.

Mom2lilpeeps 03-02-2008 05:58 PM

Hello all, I have been lurking around here for quite some time reading and learning. I have two little people and have been looking at Montessori for their education since infancy. We finally went to the Children's House to observe and learn more about the school. We are really sure that this is the right fit for our family. Our little girl (soon to be 4) will be starting in the fall. Our little boy (just turned 3) will probably not start until next year sometime. We have some self maintainance issues to work on with the little guy. I appreciate all the suggested reading that I've learned about here. It has been instrumental in helping us make an informed decision. The one thing that impressed me about the Children's House our little people will be attending was the respect the adults have for the children. I was amazed! The children also respected the adults but more from the behavior being modeled for them rather than a forced kind of thing. YKWIM? Obviously, the educational part of Montessori is wonderful but I am so happy our children will be respected as individuals and for just being themselves. As a stay at home mother who has spent very little time away from my children, this is a huge comfort to me.
I'm not sure I've communicated very well, (little people are busy around me) suffice to say, I am excited for dd to be starting school in the fall and will be coming around here to talk to and learn from all of you.

dready_betty 03-02-2008 06:44 PM

Wow, Letty, what an inspiration you are! Your school sounds like a great place to be. I too feel like a fish out of water (I'm in central Oklahoma), but the good thing is, there's always something to work on, whether it's the way we teach or the way we eat...anyways keep up the good work!

Flor 03-03-2008 12:58 AM

[QUOTE=Freedom72;10669121]



We have students in grades K-7 (soon to be grade 8), and a thriving community of 135 students currently. We have grades 1-3 together, grades 4-6 (with 2 seventh graders because we plan to add a middle school next year and wanted to allow them to stay for that), but Kinder is by themselves because CA law in public school does not allow preschool to be attached to Kindergarten...though that might soon change.
We just had a poetry jam yesterday, where students who chose to do so
Letty
QUOTE]

There is a Montessoir school just north of here in Santa Maria that is a private school for primary and a public charter grade 1+. I didn't understand why, but it probably has to do with that law. How interesting.

Can I ask what area of Calif. you are in?

Freedom72 03-03-2008 01:36 PM

Hi Flor, I am in Temecula, but our new building will be in Murrieta, 8 miles north. I am an hour north of San Diego, but inland a bit, if you didn't know...the desert!

You are south of Santa Maria...is that Santa Barbara? I lived there for 10 years and LOVED it.

They have an AMI school in Lompoc, but I believe that it is all private...is that the one you are talking about (though I believe that is slightly south of Santa Maria).

I must say that I have friends who send their kids to the AMI school in Santa Barbara, and the elementary program sounds very "clickish." They are so into "not intervening," that there are kids who are unkind to each other. Also, what is weird is that the kids are very aware of what grade level they are in, and only play with the kids in their grade. For example, first grade only plays with first grade. At my school, no one even knows what grade the other kids are in, nor do they care!

MattBronsil 03-03-2008 02:20 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by mom4emnxani View Post
The children also respected the adults but more from the behavior being modeled for them rather than a forced kind of thing. YKWIM? Obviously, the educational part of Montessori is wonderful but I am so happy our children will be respected as individuals and for just being themselves. As a stay at home mother who has spent very little time away from my children, this is a huge comfort to me.
I'm not sure I've communicated very well, (little people are busy around me) suffice to say, I am excited for dd to be starting school in the fall and will be coming around here to talk to and learn from all of you.
Aha! And there is the inspiration for my new blog.

Going to go write it now.

EDIT: Ok. It's 12:40 AM here and I started to write it. I ran out of steam.

I'm going to start a new thread on the topic and maybe get some input. See if I can pick this up in the morning.


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