My Child is Three and He Cannot Read - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 45 Old 08-13-2013, 12:45 AM
 
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I'm with you on 3-4-5....but 6 and 7? You're saying first and second graders shouldn't be able to read? That sounds odd to me. I mean, it's probably not the biggest deal in the world, but definitely not an ideal to strive toward. 

 

I'm truly not being argumentative, just expressing surprise. I think I read The Lion the Witch and the Wardrobe when I was 7, and I'm no genius. 

A 6 year old, in Waldorf, will just barely be starting First Grade. The "cut off" dates are different than public schools. Kids need to be fully 6, most 6 1/2, before starting. Actually my daughter didn't start until age 7. So YES, some of us are saying they shouldn't be able to read yet. Now 'should,' is really open. If your child figures it out fine, but no one is sitting them down with a leap pad and some flash cards. 

 

Having said that, she somehow managed to teach herself (or some rubbed off from her older sibling) math.  Seriously, at least adding and subtracting, two years before first grade. I did nothing to discourage it, but also didn't sit down and do drills with her. 

 

HangingWaldorfMomheadinshame. (Yes, that is sarcastic).

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#32 of 45 Old 09-01-2013, 12:27 PM
 
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We all have different learning curves.  I'm sure if your son could not read now he is good doing something else.  Things that he is most interested.  That is why we are mothers right?  We support our children all the way.

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#33 of 45 Old 09-02-2013, 06:56 PM
 
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We all have different learning curves.  I'm sure if your son could not read now he is good doing something else.  Things that he is most interested.  That is why we are mothers
right?  We support our children all the way.


I think you missed the sarcasm that was in the original post. She doesn't feel badly about it, the opposite. Most three-year-olds don't read nor should they be expected to read. Are you familiar with Waldorf??
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#34 of 45 Old 09-12-2013, 09:45 AM
 
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Hi thtm2007.  I did not miss the initial post. I was stressing out that we all have strengths I think my point was the same point of everyone here.  Again, we are all mothers and would want the best for our children at any time and at any cost.  And yes, I am familiar with Waldorf.  

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#35 of 45 Old 09-12-2013, 04:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm pretty glad my son can't read. He just started a Waldorf preschool today where he gets to play in the sandbox, color, paint, make bread and play play play. A lot more important stuff than reading at his age. :-)

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#36 of 45 Old 09-18-2013, 12:19 PM
 
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It didn't quite read that way to me, thank you for clarifying. ;-)
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#37 of 45 Old 09-18-2013, 01:19 PM
 
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My kid is 2 and he doesn't sleep through the night. Sleep deprivation is STILL an issue for me sometimes.
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#38 of 45 Old 10-14-2013, 09:54 PM
 
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Sorry, mistake.
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#39 of 45 Old 01-23-2014, 08:05 PM
 
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My four year old also can't read...and frankly I get a little nervous when she seems to be trying to figure out words or letters, lol.  Seriously...I had a pretty unbalanced childhood because I was an early reader, academically advanced and was basically a bookworm.  Which was very good in some respects, but in hindsight left me pretty unbalanced.  I'm sure, without question, that my daughter will fall in love with reading someday.  She's already on her way there, she is able to pretty much memorize entire books just based on the pictures and having me read them a few times.  I just hope she gets plenty of time to stomp in mudpuddles and play in the dirt before she gets sucked into the world of books and academia.  


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#40 of 45 Old 02-04-2014, 10:36 PM
 
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From a teachers perspective who has been teaching early childhood for the past eight years, I think it is so refreshing to have a parent like you that sees the value in simply playing.  You are right, your child is three and from my perspective should't be concerned with those things, not now at least. I commend you for allowing your child to just be...   

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#41 of 45 Old 06-14-2014, 07:52 PM
 
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I've been a waldorf student (but started in 8th grade), a waldorf mother, a waldorf staff member (business manager) and am currently a waldorf grandmother. So I've seen this from a lot of different angles.

I can say with certainty that my daughter, who learned how to read in 2nd grade, turned out just as well as I did, learning to read in 1st grade. Back in the bad old days, reading was taught in 1st grade, not kindergarten or nursery school.

Both of my grandchildren learned in 2nd grade. What delighted me was that they spent so little time on the process. Both of them went from reading "Frog and Toad" at the beginning of the year to reading the Little House series by the end of the year and then went on to become bookworms.

And all that time that they wasted not struggling with reading? Well, they can knit, crochet, embroider, garden, cook, build, take care of animals, act, play musical instruments and just have a lot of fun.

Poor, deprived children...
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#42 of 45 Old 09-17-2014, 12:47 AM
 
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This is so fantastic! My 3.5 year old can't sing her alphabet song either and pretends to read but just makes up her own stories. Now she does count to 30 but that's because she taught herself. No joke. The girl loves numbers. I despise numbers She's also incredibly cautious physically but has been telling me stories since she was two. Kids are brilliant and creative and unique and I love Waldorf education for telling the world to let them be! Let them be little, let them have huge imaginations, let then have fears and hopes and be ok with all of it
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#43 of 45 Old 10-10-2014, 03:14 PM
 
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LOVE this thread! My almost 4yo picked up on a lot of the stuff he's "supposed" to be learning without us specifically teaching it to him...he can recognize written letters, a couple of words (he's ALWAYS pointing to words and asking what they mean), alphabet song, stuff like that. But I'm all fretting because he doesn't do a whole lot of imaginative play, doesn't draw, not interested in painting. He's 100% gross motor, full body play. I have to remind myself that he can do a TON of things physically that his peers aren't even close to accomplishing. He can climb and jump better than just about any kid his age I've come across.



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#44 of 45 Old 10-11-2014, 10:42 AM
 
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We usually don't start teaching to read unti after age 5. Usually around 4 we teach them letters and what sounds they make then we will break out the phonics books.
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#45 of 45 Old Yesterday, 08:14 AM
 
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LOVE this thread! My almost 4yo picked up on a lot of the stuff he's "supposed" to be learning without us specifically teaching it to him...he can recognize written letters, a couple of words (he's ALWAYS pointing to words and asking what they mean), alphabet song, stuff like that. But I'm all fretting because he doesn't do a whole lot of imaginative play, doesn't draw, not interested in painting. He's 100% gross motor, full body play. I have to remind myself that he can do a TON of things physically that his peers aren't even close to accomplishing. He can climb and jump better than just about any kid his age I've come across.
This was my dd at that age, as well, except that she did enjoy doing art and crafts. She would do imaginative play as long as I did it with her but she was just really driven in gross motor skills and academic skills. She totally taught herself to read and write quite early. I think the important thing is just learning to love and accept whatever strengths your individual child has. My daughter is nearly 9 now and is an awesome ballerina, is very creative, reads at a high school level, and is totally brilliant and amazing. But I remember how much I worried when she was 3-4-5 about her lack of the kind of Waldorf-inspired imaginative play I had hoped for. What I've since realized is that she just isn't the Waldorf poster child, and that's totally awesome, too.

Allison:  a little bit Waldorf, a little bit Medievalish, and always"MOMMMMYYYY!" to sweet Cecily since 12.22.05
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