A Safe, Healthy Haven: Waldorf Questioners/Concerns Thread - Page 5 - Mothering Forums

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Old 02-09-2006, 02:35 AM
 
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Thanks very much!
I really want my DS to go to Waldorf school, but have had some people show me some info about it that was pretty anti-Waldorf and kind of made me not be so into the idea b/c it creeped me out.
I need to look at both sides and visit the potential schools.
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Old 02-09-2006, 11:20 AM
 
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reading this is a real eye-opener - thanks for sharing this with us - are there others out there with similar terrible experiences ??
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Old 02-09-2006, 01:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Lizzo, good for you. It is always best to find out things on your own, visit schools, and make your own decision based on your Mama intuition.

Annarosa, there were several threads where many people on MDC shared their negative experiences and hurt feelings. But since a couple people on both sides could not remain mature, those threads were cancelled.

That's why I started this thread, in a more "support" oriented light, with the guidelines I set out in the original post. That way, people can voice their concerns and experiences, and feel safe.

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Old 02-15-2006, 04:34 PM
 
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hello... I was looking into waldorf education for my son. But I started to read some of rudolf steiners actually philosiphys. I was reading somethings he was saying about karmadic levels... and how some children were at diffrent karma levels that other kids. ex: an asian child was at a lower level than say a white child... and that someday the asian child could be reincarnated into a white child. i found this to be alittle wierd along with alot of his books.. I guess my real question is .... has anyone ever experiances racism? I know that to be a waldorf teacher you have to study his teachings... so i wonder what flows over into their teachings...?
thanks
Lynn
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Old 02-15-2006, 04:37 PM
 
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I too am looking into waldorf but I hs and am thinking of using some of the curriculum minus the anthroposophy religiousity. Anyone do this? is this way off base?? I like alot of the beliefs,wooden toys,soft colors,rhythm in the day and songs and such.~Thanks
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Old 02-15-2006, 07:48 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Humanmilkmachine (I'm feeling very much like a milk machine mayself, laely!), One thing to remember is that Waldorf IS Anthroposophy. This has benn discussed in this thread and you can read about it on the earlier posts if you want...

As a former Waldorf Teacher and someone who formally studied Anthroposophy in both Waldorf teacher-training and in a formal study group in my hometown, I would say that Rudolf Steiner's philosophies absolutley are found in every Waldorf school.

The faculty in my former school definitely spoke of the children being, as you said, on "different karmic levels", and the race, and bodily/bone structure, etc. was used to judge each child and determine how to deal with them.
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Old 02-15-2006, 07:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I know many people who homeschool and have left Waldorf schools, taking away only what "sat right" with them.

I am one! (I even teach others' children in this manner, offering classes for homeschoolers in a variety of Waldorf subjects.)

If I were you, I'd start a thread if you'd like support for this and some good ideas from others.

Good luck and have fun!
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Old 02-16-2006, 02:30 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beansavi
I know many people who homeschool and have left Waldorf schools, taking away only what "sat right" with them.

I am one! (I even teach others' children in this manner, offering classes for homeschoolers in a variety of Waldorf subjects.)

If I were you, I'd start a thread if you'd like support for this and some good ideas from others.

Good luck and have fun!
Thank you- I just might.
Now my next question...
I have a good good friend who is a waldorf teacher. I want to approach her with all that I have learned on this thread and elsewhere about the negatives and racism etc about Steiner. Do you think she already knows? This seems so not like her to accept as she is very much an advocate against racism. Please give me your thoughts beansavi. thank you.
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Old 02-16-2006, 04:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Chandraj,

As a former Waldorf teacher myself, who met many teachers from all over the country (and world) during teacher-training and dealings in my former school, I guess I'd have to say the following, based on my own perspective and experiences:

A) Waldorf allows people to teach before actually getting certified in Waldorf Ed. They actually don't even have to have a college degree since they are private schools, and many teachers don't. So, a lot of people get involved with a school on a career level not really understanding, at first, what they are truly getting into.

B) Some teachers, etc. know about Steiner's racist attitudes, but say that they are "old timey" rhetoric that doesn't apply to them or their school in today's world, but...

C) The problem and inaccuracy of both of these standpoints is that all Waldorf Schools are members of the Association of Waldorf Schools in North America (AWSNA) and have to be in order to call themselves Waldorf Schools at all.

All Waldorf Schools are constantly monitored by AWSNA and required to meet certain criteria.

All members of AWSNA are Anthroposophists (are well-studied in Steiner and his beliefs) and believe in what we see as racist viewpoints by Steiner. These very people guide the Waldorf schools not only in a business sense, but in how they deal with and look at children and their family members. It may not be stated publicly, but Waldorf schools and their faculty always fall back on Anthroposophy, as was done in my case (see my story on the first pages of this thread).

So, in summary, it is false and impossible to say that certain Waldorf Schools do not abide by Steiners view of the world and of humanity, even his more racist-sounding views. They absolutely do.

Steiner's opinions are law in a Waldorf school. All of them.

In my experience, just because some people have not had to deal with Steiner's view of humanity face to face (yet), doesn't mean they won't be "bitten in the butt" by it sooner or later...

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Old 02-16-2006, 04:37 PM
 
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And, for many of us, that time comes sooner.... although, it is a bittersweet blessing: better to know the truth sooner than later, I say.
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Old 02-16-2006, 04:58 PM
 
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thank you beansavi-
hmm I guess I have some talkin to do
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Old 02-16-2006, 07:13 PM - Thread Starter
 
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May May---Amen, sista'.

Chandraj---good for you for even thinking about it...


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Old 02-16-2006, 07:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annarosa
reading this is a real eye-opener - thanks for sharing this with us - are there others out there with similar terrible experiences ??
Hi Annarosa, I didn't see your post until now. There are many many people with negative experiences and many support groups around the world. Many people posted on MDC about negative experiences, too.
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Old 02-16-2006, 11:33 PM
 
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Wow, first of all I'd like to say this thread has had to be one of the most informative and respectful Waldorf "Concerns" thread I have read but definitely time consuming to read. Took me all day in 10 minute spurts...lol. Also, congratulations beansavi on birthing your new baby (my nephew holds the same b-day except he was born in 2004).

I am a SAHM to a beautiful 10 month old boy and so school is not for a few years yet. I practice AP and before I became a mother, I was a elementary education teacher (state certified for public education). I love teaching - my calling has to do with the field of education (just not sure what aspect yet). Anyway, I am a very resourceful and thorough person and I figure that it will take me at least from now until my ds is ready to be introduced to formal education (preschool experience) before I settle on a style of education for him. SO I have started doing my research and I when I stumbled on Waldorf education, I immediately thought it was the answer to what I was looking for. But through this post and my research elsewhere, I am realizing that a Waldorf school isn't for me or my family's needs. So, thank you for starting this thread. However, I would love if chandra would start a thread on how to incorporate some Waldorf concepts into homeschooling situation. For example, I love the way the Waldorf style to teaching the letters is through stories and art work. I just would begin this at a younger age than 7 or 8 (when all the baby teeth have fallen out).

Needless to say, I will definitely be homeschooling my ds because there is not one form of education that appeals to me but several. I am going to find a way to take what it is I like from each one and create a schooling experience for my ds that is appropriate to him.

I do have a couple of questions: Could you describe what the Sweat Peas class is like?

beansavi, could you point me in the direction of where I can learn more about this comment----> "was three weeks overdue at birth, and thus this means he resisted incarnation and did not want to come to earth to do the work he needs to do." My ds was 1 week overdue and his birthing experience was a very very difficult one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by beansavi

How do you deal with the anger and indignation side of things? I'd love to hear from others. Even those who read this thread around the world (over 3,000) but don't speak, need us, Mamas.

Love,
In general, the way I deal with the anger and indignation side of things is using the trial to sharpen me (iron sharpens iron). When I am going through a trial, I usually spend time with God on a self-reflective meditative state and work through what exactly He wants me to learn from the experience. I usually gain a new strength that I take with me to the next "battle". I hope my suggestion may help in some way
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Old 02-17-2006, 06:26 PM - Thread Starter
 
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PrincessDoll,

So nice to meet you, and thank you for your guidance at the bottom of your post. I definitely benefitted from hearing that one!

You know, you could start the thread on Waldorf homeschooling if you need it...and Chandraj can help you. There may already be ones if you check the Waldorf Education forum archives.

As far as the quote about the child resisting incarnating, this is found all over Steiner's works (lectures and books). Mostly, I learned this in teacher training and as I said, it was stated back to me about my own child, later. Some basics of Steiner/Anthroposphy/Waldorf that cover the incarnation issues are:

The Education of the Child

Man As Symphony of the Creative Word

An Outline of Esoteric Science

How to Know Higher Worlds

and you can look some things up online.

Sorry baby crying...gotta' nurse for now.

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Old 02-19-2006, 03:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I was just watching The Actors Studio, the one interviewing Dave Chapelle. He was talking about his style of comedy, but something he said made me think of the discussion lately on this thread.

He said "America needs an honest discourse with itself: it needs to be honest about what its about, who we are, the good and the bad, in order to heal, to be truly healthy."

That immediately made me think of the Waldorf movement: no one is coming out (from AWSNA,etc.) and saying anything like "Hey, we know some of Steiner's views appear racist, elitist,etc., but today in America, we don't follow those opinions". If they are not saying this, then they obviously do follow his opinions. (They show they follow them through, their actions, too, by the way, however.)




Quote:
Originally Posted by beansavi
Hi Chandraj,

As a former Waldorf teacher myself, who met many teachers from all over the country (and world) during teacher-training and dealings in my former school, I guess I'd have to say the following, based on my own perspective and experiences:

A) Waldorf allows people to teach before actually getting certified in Waldorf Ed. They actually don't even have to have a college degree since they are private schools, and many teachers don't. So, a lot of people get involved with a school on a career level not really understanding, at first, what they are truly getting into.

B) Some teachers, etc. know about Steiner's racist attitudes, but say that they are "old timey" rhetoric that doesn't apply to them or their school in today's world, but...

C) The problem and inaccuracy of both of these standpoints is that all Waldorf Schools are members of the Association of Waldorf Schools in North America (AWSNA) and have to be in order to call themselves Waldorf Schools at all.

All Waldorf Schools are constantly monitored by AWSNA and required to meet certain criteria.

All members of AWSNA are Anthroposophists (are well-studied in Steiner and his beliefs) and believe in what we see as racist viewpoints by Steiner. These very people guide the Waldorf schools not only in a business sense, but in how they deal with and look at children and their family members. It may not be stated publicly, but Waldorf schools and their faculty always fall back on Anthroposophy, as was done in my case (see my story on the first pages of this thread).

So, in summary, it is false and impossible to say that certain Waldorf Schools do not abide by Steiners view of the world and of humanity, even his more racist-sounding views. They absolutely do.

Steiner's opinions are law in a Waldorf school. All of them.

In my experience, just because some people have not had to deal with Steiner's view of humanity face to face (yet), doesn't mean they won't be "bitten in the butt" by it sooner or later...

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Old 02-19-2006, 05:20 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by beansavi
I was just watching The Actors Studio, the one interviewing Dave Chapelle. He was talking about his style of comedy, but something he said made me think of the discussion lately on this thread.

He said "America needs an honest discourse with itself: it needs to be honest about what its about, who we are, the good and the bad."

That immediately made me think of the Waldorf movement: no one is coming out (from AWSNA,etc.) and saying anything like "Hey, we know some of Steiner's views appear racist, elitist,etc., but today in America, we don;t follow those opions". If they are not saying this, then they obviously do follow his opinions. (They show they follow them through, their actions, too, by the way, however.)

Editing, because this is not a debate thread, into an I statement. I am not a racist, my children are not racists, my children's school is not racist, my children's teachers are not racists. Our school is a member of AWSNA.
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Old 02-19-2006, 06:47 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rhonwyn
I feel like I need to address this even though for obvious reasons I do not usually post in this thread. What you have posted above is not what I have experienced in our school. Our school celebrates MLK day as well as Kwanzaa as well as providing all skin tone crayons/pencils to the students. My child in 2nd grade is listening to saint tales, african tales, arabic tales, etc. I am sorry you had such a bad experience but please quit brushing all schools with the same generalizations.
Hi again, Rhonwyn,

Like you said, for obvious reasons you do not post here: you are not someone who needs to heal from a negative Waldorf experience.

This thread is not the place to try and back up, accusing people of generalizing, etc., or of having ill intentions (as was the trouble in the older threads that questioned Steiner and Waldorf).

Please review the guidelines for posting on this thread and adhere to them. They are stated here in post #1 and in the sticky created by Lauren.

This thread will not turn into a debate as the others have.

Also, please read the entire thread so you are familiar with what someone may be referencing, rather than thinking this is a multi-cultural / holiday issue and accusing me of generalizing. This is is not the case. This is obvious from my statement about the Association of Waldorf Schools in North America (AWSNA).

I thank you for repeatedly mentioning that I am a former parent that "had a bad experience" in a Waldorf school, but, as you know, I also
am a trained Waldorf teacher,
assisted in the founding of a Waldorf school,
belonged to an Anthroposophical study group for years and
did the first stages of membership into the School of Spiritual Science (the "First Class" level of Anthroposophy whose doctrines/books are guarded and held in secrecy by the Anthroposophical Society in America and members of the School of Spiritual Science).

The fact that Steiner's statements in many books are viewed as racist is a fact that is shared by many worldwide. It is not up for debate here, nor is the fact that people find his views (about various skin colors and bone structure) racist even a debatable point in my view.

People's discomfort with what Steiner has claimed is just a fact at this point in history.

Let's please not go into all the accusations of ill intent again, and maintain a good vibe here.

That is all I will say regarding your post and now we (those needing to heal from a negative Waldorf experience) will continue with where we were in our discussions.
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Old 02-19-2006, 09:00 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I edited my last post to clarify where I am coming from when I give observations based on my own "experiences".

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Old 02-21-2006, 03:40 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow guys, we are up to over 4,300 views worldwide now! I know for certain that all these viewers are not reading the thread just out of "morbid curiosity", but out of a need for clarity of all sides where Waldorf is concerned, as is evident in the posts here and the PMs I have received.

The numbers are great and say a lot about the maturity and honesty of all involved... Thanks to all.
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Old 02-22-2006, 04:00 AM
 
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Hi, I'm new here, my first time posting.

I've got a child in 4th grade at a Waldorf Inspired school. Our son has been in the school since Kindergarten.

I felt very good about our choice when he was in Kindergarten; it was a lovely experience for him. I could tell he was happy. First grade was another story with an extremely strict teacher. There was no connection with the teacher for DH and me. My son would have his hello and goodbye with her and always seemed uncomfortable--the handshake. The teacher had poor skills with adults and with her colleagues and finally left the school. She had taken a class through the grades, however.

From what I could ascertain, the students were deathly afraid of the teacher. My son speaks of her turning red in the face when she became angry with a student. He was afraid of her--afraid to approach her. She began "training" them this way from her first day with them. Even though the students seemed to be fearful of her, many were very sad to see her go. Many parents were, too. She had an amazing "power" over the parents and students that perplexed me. She was a very "on-top-of-it" teacher. Yet I had concerns, obviously. I know my son was learning, but at what expense?

This year he has a teacher who is a complete 180 degrees different from his first teacher. The teacher has no control over the class and the children completely disrespect her. The principal tells us the children are acting appropriately for their age. I don't know that my son is learning and at what expense?

Mostly, I'm appalled. From his frist teacher to this teacher it is what I imagine to be extremes in both cases. Or is it?

We are considering an alternative to Waldorf Education, but before we do anything we will regret, I am hoping to open a discussion about Waldorf teachers or maybe just teachers in general. Granted, I don't have trust in teachers, more, I feel that they need to prove themselves to me. With the two extremes my son has had in teachers I also have learned that to be an organized teacher is helpful; this year I have no idea how my son is faring due to the disorganization of the new teacher, yet she is kind, yet the children are so disrespectful.....is this a WE situation or is this found in all realms of school? I'm not sure having only had this one experience.

I always felt bad for not "getting along" with my son's teacher and am trying to get along with the new teacher, but find it challenging to respect her because of what I see with the children.

Beansavi, I hope with your knowledge of WE you can give me some ideas and anyone else with input.
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Old 02-22-2006, 03:23 PM
 
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I am new here, too, Wonder.

First off, before I add to anything here, I want to say that I am so sorry. Bensavi and others, I am so sorry for your experiences. I have seen and experienced similar things, and I believe you. I am not, however, here to disparage WE or anthroposophy. I have had some difficult experiences myself. I don't want to debate, but would like to express that I don't believe it is WE or anthroposophy at the root of these negative experiences, but the people and how they choose to practice and behave that can be the problem. I do want to support everyone here and wish to explore and question rather than debate.

One question for you, Bensavi (congratulations, btw, on your new baby). This is true curiosity and nothing more. Do you believe that WE is anthroposophy even when woven into curriculum like Oak Meadow and Enki? I'd love to hear your thoughts on that. If you prefer to pm, since it may not be of interest to everyone, I understand and welcome that.

Wonder, always remember that you are the parent, and you have the option at every moment to seek your own inner wisdom. It is there for all of us. It is not always easy to find, but it is there. When we want to be part of a community so much in this culture, we will sometimes quiet our inner sense of truth to keep peace. Don't be tempted. You are wise to ask questions and to consider making a change in the best interest of your child.

I want to be careful how this comes out, because I don't want to debate or challenge anyone, but I do want to share my view from experiences in Waldorf both positive and negative. I have had experiences in Waldorf schools that felt too rigid and dogmatic for my preferences, and I have had experiences in lively Waldorf schools that truly do seek renewal in thier work and inspire me. Waldorf schools can be as different as night and day. The school in Lexington, Mass. is not the school in Taos, NM. I do not identify as an anthroposophist, yet I have studied anthroposophy and have completed much of my teacher training. I am no expert, but I do hold a MA in Human Development, too. The inner work of anthroposophy has enriched my life a great deal. Yoga has enriched my life, too. Many wonderful teachings and experiences have. Each of us has our own journey in this life, whether it is predetermined or hinging on the arch of your foot or thickness of your skin or what. Negative judgments do not help us. There is no one path or way. I firmly believe that the moment we think we have found our way and then find it is the way for everyone, we have lost our progress on our spiritual journey and meet a very serious set back. IMO, this is the trouble with WE, which is not different from the trouble of the time we are living in, which IMO is: Fundamentalism. My oh my have I met some anthro. fundamentalists. Sadly, I doubt you can live in this time and avoid meeting a fundamentalist or two of some kind or another (and you are lucky if that is all). I hope I live to see a change in this! I've met public school fundamentalists, and Montessori fundamentalists, too. It is the challenge of our time that I worry will make or break us as a species on this planet depending on how we deal with it. In WE and in life in general, it is important to trust our inner wisdom and make the best decisions we know how to make.

Wonder, the teachers at your school are referring to what in WE is called the nine year change. It is a time of leaving the dreaminess of childhood and encountering oneself upright. There are many behaviors that do typically accompany this time of change, but you should be careful to discern (as it seems you are) where it is used as an excuse for disrespectful behavior. It seems like it may be used as an excuse in your case. Herein lies another issue. It may not be ill intentions on the part of teachers but overwhelm and lack of knowlege or information...which is mentioned elsewhere on this thread. Waldorf teachers are all overwhelmed, at least some of the time. I have never met a Waldorf teacher who did not, in some way related to thier job, feel overwhelmed. I think most teachers become interested in WE because they truly care and love children and want to teach in a holistic way. Some, however, are attracted to WE because they are serving thier version of anthroposophy...and maybe they chose anthroposophy as a path because they need to feel superior or control. I have seen it. I know it is there. Thankfully, I have seen more loving teachers who are there for the right reasons with good intentions. That said, I don't doubt that others may have met more controlling or rigid teachers who are working with children for the wrong reasons. I have seen some nasty shaming of children in WE. Thankfully, this has not happened in the school we are in, but in one that I visited. It made me sick. I know it happens. It happens in many schools of various methods...sadly.

So, Wonder, there may very well be a better learning environment for your child. Ask questions and hold them, but I encourage you to be willing to let go. It is overwhelming to either stay or go sometimes, but try to see the gifts in change. You do have choices.

Bensavi and others, you are brave to speak about your experiences and I am very happy to see there is a place for support. I hope my words can be this too, as I don't want to defend, but to share my experiences and thoughts that have led me to some conclusions.

I likely have some more to say, but as Bensavi wrote early in the tread...pacing oneself is necessary. I hope this post is perceived as supportive. I mean it to be.

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Old 02-22-2006, 03:31 PM
 
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Wonder, I just realized that was your first and only post. When I say "I am new here, too" I mean to the thread, not MDC. Just to clarify!
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Old 02-22-2006, 03:42 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wonder
Hi, I'm new here, my first time posting.

Mostly, I'm appalled. From his frist teacher to this teacher it is what I imagine to be extremes in both cases. Or is it?

We are considering an alternative to Waldorf Education, but before we do anything we will regret, I am hoping to open a discussion about Waldorf teachers or maybe just teachers in general. Granted, I don't have trust in teachers, more, I feel that they need to prove themselves to me. With the two extremes my son has had in teachers I also have learned that to be an organized teacher is helpful; this year I have no idea how my son is faring due to the disorganization of the new teacher, yet she is kind, yet the children are so disrespectful.....is this a WE situation or is this found in all realms of school? I'm not sure having only had this one experience.

Beansavi, I hope with your knowledge of WE you can give me some ideas and anyone else with input.
Hi Wonder,

I can certainly understand your experience, and I have seen this happen many times, so you are not alone.

Under no circumsatnces should a child ever be "deathly afraid" of their teacher!

There is no excuse for this and it is even more pitiable when the child is afraid to tell his or her own parents right away. Unfortunately, we find out at the end of the year, when the child has the freedom of Summer vacation surrounding them. This was my child's experience. I have worked in public ed., too, and this would not be tolerated, and would be dealt with immediately. There is more of a backup (for parents, children, and teachers, too) there than can be found in Waldorf right now.

From my perspective/experience in Waldorf Education, this could be yet another example of what happens when people get involved in a school (as teachers) without having too much educational experience, since Waldorf is private and you don't even have to have a bachelors degree to teach in a Waldorf School.

Now, some schools are beginning to require their teachers to have at least a bachelor's degree, and make them promise to go obtain Waldorf certification over time, but not all schools are as strict as others. In my area, one Waldorf school is requiring these things but has just begun to do so, and they have been around for 25 years.

Newer schools are in a tougher place: parents want their child to have a class, and so accept less experienced teachers. Down the line the scenario is that people are afraid to bring up negative issues that have arisen because they have invested so much of their lives and the life of their child in the school. If the class fell through, the child would be hurt/disappointed, and often their whole community would be lost. That is a dangerous place to be, and I have been there. I let crap go on too long out of this very concern.

In my former school, I was the only one who pointed to elephants under the carpet, and you see what happened to me.

A school in a developing stage is so vulnerable, and in my experience I have seen it make everyone working there feel vulnerable, too, as to job security, etc. So, they ignore big things, not looking at the "long run" helath of the school just the initial "getting by".

Both of the scenarios you have descibed with both teachers is not unusual for me to hear about. I am so sorry you and your child have had to deal with such a thing.

Bottom line: always address your concerns, respectfully, to the school. For your child and yourself:

Always point out the elephants!
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Old 02-22-2006, 03:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi BrowneyedGirl,

Yes, I did perceive your post as supportive. Please know I feel that "Supportive" doesn't mean we all have to agree every minute, but that we are respectful to every poster and that we assume the goodness of the intentions behind every poster.

You have made some great points, and I especially related to and appreciate the one about Waldorf techers being overwhelmed sometimes. It takes a lot of energy to not only teach, but to also be running the school (as well as have a life outside of the school!).

Also, yes, there are fundementalists in all areas of life. Unfortuantely, AWSNA is full of them, and my point earlier was just that they can overflow into any school at any moment.

Thanks for joining us!

Sincerely,
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Old 02-23-2006, 04:45 AM
 
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This is what my inner wisdom tells me from my experience:

WE is good in theory and more difficult to execute practically. WE is open to interpretation--by me and teachers. I have high expectations of myself and Waldorf teachers (the teachers in our school have 4-year degrees plus their Waldorf training) and of the school community (another story--I'm pacing myself, too ). As a parent, a very concerned and conscious parent, I am also overwhelmed at times. Maybe it is what happens for us in the realm of our precious children--teachers and parents--it goes with the territory. We can all use gentle care.

Thank you browneyedgirl and beansavi for answering my post. I'm frustrated, but haven't given up hope; WE isn't the only way. I can take what I love from it and move forward to another, better experience for my family.

Change is good, I am willing to let go and accept the gift of change. Once again my child has a hand in my learning.
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Old 02-23-2006, 07:36 PM - Thread Starter
 
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[QUOTE I can take what I love from it and move forward to another, better experience for my family.

Beautifully said.

Change is good, I am willing to let go and accept the gift of change. Once again my child has a hand in my learning.[/QUOTE]

You have touched on what it took me years to realize and then to accept. Good for you. You are so wise!

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Old 02-23-2006, 09:19 PM
 
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What Bensavi said!

It is just so true that our children are teaching us. Wow, the lessons...

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Old 02-24-2006, 06:30 PM - Thread Starter
 
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(nak)

browneyedgirl,

i'm intrigued by the virtues website! i'm going to try to read through it soon...
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Old 03-01-2006, 06:09 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ignore below: still workin' on it!

(nak)

What does Beansavi look like?

Okay, I think I figured this out:The link is a picture of my eldest son, who went to Waldorf, and I -- when I was still very pregnant last Thanksgiving!

Let me know if you can see it!
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