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#1 of 22 Old 06-25-2012, 05:43 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I had been planning an unassisted birth but it seems that my iron is very low which increases my risk for hemorrhage, and now it seems I may also have gestational diabetes.   What do you ladies think?   What about delivering at home and going to L&D for postpartum care or should I just accept that safest place for me may be L&D.   Our hospital is very natural childbirth friendly,  I just worry about being pressured into unnecessary interventions with the higher risk category.  Anyone have experience with this or Thoughts?

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#2 of 22 Old 06-25-2012, 05:53 PM
 
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If you bleed out, you will not be able to get to L&D for postpartum care.

 

Anemia is serious business. So is diabetes. You have 2 serious risk factors.

 

There is blog I read that is base in India. It is clear how dangerous anemia is.

 

 

 

http://jeevankuruvilla.blogspot.com/

 

No one in the hospital can do anything without your consent. You can refuse epidurals etc. You can ask for hep-lock instead of IV.

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#3 of 22 Old 06-25-2012, 06:10 PM
 
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I've had low iron and brought it back up for homebirth so as not to risk out. Take Floradix or a similar well absorbed iron supplement faithfully. Re-test your hemoglobin, keep taking a supp at least until your postpartum bleeding ends. If your levels are just moderately low (like 9.5g/dl), having herbs (shepherd's purse, chlorophyll supplement, the floridix) on hand and being willing to transfer in case of real problems should do it. But if it's still very low when you go into labor you're better off going to the hospital just before pushing. I would hate to transfer after a birth as a matter of course, they'll treat you and the baby as unclean and treat for extra imagined risks, and may even treat you badly as punishment.

 

Monitor your sugars carefully too, follow a strict diabetic diet and get a monitor, if that actually gets bad you'll need to transfer to a doctor's care and maybe even induce labor. But that's if it gets beyond borderline. Also in labor you'll need to take care to keep blood sugar steady.

 

Edit- misremembered numbers, double checked.

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#4 of 22 Old 06-27-2012, 06:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Midwife ruled out Gestational Diabetes thank goodness.   I'm wondering how quickly can I get my iron up?  Any tips?  I'm really really awful and would like to get it up as soon as possible regardless of home or hospital birth.

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#5 of 22 Old 06-27-2012, 06:49 PM
 
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My hemoglobin was at 8 and got up to 9.5 in a month on liquid floradix normal dosage, so that I was within acceptable range by 8 months along. I've since switched to the pills of it and just taking them when I feel off, but as I'm pregnant again I'll start taking them with more regularity soon. Tablets are much more pleasant and don't go bad as quickly.

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#6 of 22 Old 06-27-2012, 07:08 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm taking the liquid floradix now and it doesn't taste nearly as bad as I remember.  Do you know is it normal for it to change the color of your urine? 

 

I was told there was no way I could gain more than 1 point in a month even if I were taking supplements consistently, so you've given me some hope.  
 

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#7 of 22 Old 06-28-2012, 12:23 AM
 
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I'm not saying you don't have anemia but just make sure that you know what your levels are first and that they coincide with actual anemia. Many women who are told they are anemic are not. I found this article by Michel Odent to be very informative:  http://www.waysofthewisewoman.com/dr-michel-odent-notes-obgyn-studies.html  (Last question on the page) I also copy-pasted it below for your convenience.

 

Also, during my pregnancy, I took liquid chlorophyll. It can help in addition to the Floradix. Take liquid chlorophyll in orange juice as iron absorbs better when consumed with Vitamin C. Congrats on finding out you don't have GD! That's good to know, at least. :)

 

"My haemoglobin is now 11.4 in week of gestation 19. A friend of mine has 7.8. Do I have to take ferrum? Is there a haemoglobin-limit?

It is probable that from now on your hemoglobin concentration will decrease. The placenta - which is 'the advocate of the baby' - will send you hormonal messages so that you dilute your blood in order to make it more fluid. Your blood volume will increase dramatically (up to 40% to 50%). Although you'll still have the same amount of hemoglobin available, its concentration in your blood will be lower if the placenta is working well. The most authoritative published study on this issue involved more than 150 000 thousands births (Steer P, Alam MA, Wadsworth J, Welch A. Relation between maternal haemoglobin concentration and birth weight in different ethnic groups. BMJ 1995; 310: 389-91). According to this huge study a hemoglobin concentration between 8.5 and 9.5 during the second half of a pregnancy is associated with the best possible birth outcomes. Furthermore, when the hemoglobin concentration fails to fall below 10.5 there is an increased risk of low birth weight, premature birth and pre-eclampsia.

 The regrettable consequence of misinterpreting this test is that, all over the world, millions of pregnant women are wrongly told that they are anemic and are given iron supplements. There is a tendency both to overlook the side effects of iron (constipation, diarrhea, heartburn, etc.) and to forget that iron inhibits the absorption of such an important growth factor as zinc. Furthermore, iron is a powerful oxidative substance that can exacerbate the production of free radicals. The disease pre-eclampsia is associated with an 'oxidative stress'. Pregnant women need antioxidants (provided in particular by fruit and vegetable) rather than oxidative substances.

You should print the abstract of the study I mentioned (you'll find it via PubMed, for example) in order to be in a position to discuss with practitioners who might tell you that you are anemic and that you need iron supplements. Don't take iron supplements as long as your iron deficiency has not been proven by specific tests (ferritine in particular).

I cannot comment on the hemoglobin concentration of your friend, first because I don't know if she is at the beginning or at the end of her pregnancy, and also because data regarding her lifestyle and data provided by a clinical exam should prevail upon the results of one laboratory test; this test should probably be repeated and completed, according to the context."


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#8 of 22 Old 07-12-2012, 07:35 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I got my levels and they are 9.4 and 27.6
 

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#9 of 22 Old 07-13-2012, 06:37 AM
 
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And you're how far along? Sounds like it's already almost perfect! Perfectly normal to go down to 10-11 with the increase in blood volume by late pregnancy, 9.5 is acceptable. Don't let it get down further and you're fine.

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#10 of 22 Old 07-13-2012, 07:11 AM
 
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I was anaemic. My birth went totally fine. I feel like I could have had him at home by myself no problem. I did, however, get up to go to the bathroom, pass out, and hemorrhage. Thank goodness for the nurses.

 

I don't know, I don't want to discourage you from having an awesome home birth! Is there something you could do just to be safe? Do the post-partum care at a hospital?

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#11 of 22 Old 07-13-2012, 03:50 PM
 
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Most cases of hemmorhage, from what I understand don't happen during the immediate postpartum. It's the cumulative loss within the first week. I would opt in a situation like this for placentophagia. It could literally be a lifesaver for some women. Bleeding out right after delivery feels scary but there's most always plenty of time, hours, as I understand it, to transport. All of what I'm saying can and should be researched rather than taking my word for it.

 

Be aware of the symptoms of shock. I never lost much blood but did feel a little shocky after my births. Because I worked on the PP bleeding though by following the general health rules, including laying in bed all day for a solid week or more, I never had any problems.

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#12 of 22 Old 07-13-2012, 03:57 PM
 
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Originally Posted by YvieRay View Post

I had been planning an unassisted birth but it seems that my iron is very low which increases my risk for hemorrhage, and now it seems I may also have gestational diabetes.   What do you ladies think?   What about delivering at home and going to L&D for postpartum care or should I just accept that safest place for me may be L&D.   Our hospital is very natural childbirth friendly,  I just worry about being pressured into unnecessary interventions with the higher risk category.  Anyone have experience with this or Thoughts?

 

I'm having multiples (2-3)  and here's what I'm doing to keep my blood supply expanding. I take taurine. It has been shown to help in many ways. If you want to build a blood supply you must be able to make use of your vitamins and minerals. Taurine keeps me feeling tops. I generally take up to six 1000mg pills a day, depending on what I need. I may need more at times but I try to take just enough to keep deficiency symptoms at bay - since little is studied with pregnant human models. This is especially important if I want to fight off gestational diabetes.

 

I also take carrot juice and make magnesium bicarbonate water drinks for myself, and sit in the sun or light bathe daily with a vitamin D light. And raw egg yolks. All of this ON TOP OF sufficient caloric intake! Don't think about gaining as much as about nourishing. You don't even need a stupid scale, the thing is your enemy if you are afraid of excess weight gain. You will pack on a lot of liquid weight if your blood supply is to expand properly. So just eat and don't look back.

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#13 of 22 Old 07-13-2012, 04:00 PM
 
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Most cases of hemmorhage, from what I understand don't happen during the immediate postpartum. It's the cumulative loss within the first week. I would opt in a situation like this for placentophagia. It could literally be a lifesaver for some women. Bleeding out right after delivery feels scary but there's most always plenty of time, hours, as I understand it, to transport. All of what I'm saying can and should be researched rather than taking my word for it.

 

Be aware of the symptoms of shock. I never lost much blood but did feel a little shocky after my births. Because I worked on the PP bleeding though by following the general health rules, including laying in bed all day for a solid week or more, I never had any problems.

 

Hours to transport for a PPH?  Uh, no.  Just no.  A woman could bleed out in minutes.

 

Not that this has anything to do with the OP.  Having anemia doesn't increase the risk for a PPH.

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#14 of 22 Old 07-13-2012, 04:07 PM
 
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Hours to transport for a PPH?  Uh, no.  Just no.  A woman could bleed out in minutes.

 

Not that this has anything to do with the OP.  Having anemia doesn't increase the risk for a PPH.

In rare cases, of course. If you don't believe me, look this stuff up. You are not talking squirting arteries, here. I do know of women transported for PPH with UC births. One of my best UC friends, actually. She had retained membranes and was quite a mess but made the long drive out just fine. The key to her recovery was a simple fingersweep in the ER, some fluid IVs and a proper postpartum babymoon. Not a big deal, but in times like these we like a good ER.

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#15 of 22 Old 07-13-2012, 11:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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That was from my blood draw at 29 weeks I believe.  I'm 32 weeks now.  I'm getting really contradicting information regarding regular numbers.  The midwife at the practice I go to said she'd like my numbers up to 10 and 30 before I deliver.  I'm not even sure what those numbers are exactly and I can't find much as far as references go for that and I'm getting frustrated.
 

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#16 of 22 Old 07-14-2012, 04:18 AM
 
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Hours to transport for a PPH?  Uh, no.  Just no.  A woman could bleed out in minutes.

 

Not that this has anything to do with the OP.  Having anemia doesn't increase the risk for a PPH.

 

Are you an experienced UC mama? Do you support UC?


Like I said, if you don't believe me, the internet is at your fingertips. I have a good freebirthing friend who had a serious PPH situation that required a long drive from the country out to the ER. She got there just fine, despite getting there in crummy shape. The OB at the ER did a gentle finger-sweep and the problem was solved, gave her some IV fluids and she went home to recover in bed. End of story. UC mamas do like a good ER from time to time.

 

I'm not going to say never is it fast, but you have to remember, far and away, the birth is a situation where it's not gushing arteries. Once a certain amount of blood loss occurs, conservation begins. Even a soldier laying for half a day on the battlefield with a bullet hole in him can wait for help in many a circumstance, and it's been found that pushing IV fluids on the scene interferes with natural body conservation of blood. This discovery means that it's more likely they would first transport to a place with surgical suits and blood replacements before attempting to raise his blood pressure with fluids again.

 

And that's for some extreme bleeding.

 

Bleeding carries the risk of falling pregnenolone levels, to the point where adrenal exhaustion can occur, damage to the hypothalmus, stroke and heart attacks, so I'm not downplaying blood loss here. But my midwife explained how slowly typical hemmorhage happens and I've not found contradictions online, myself. In fact, I have found information like the paragraph I wrote about battlefield injuries, which just serves to confirm what I've already been taught about PP blood loss.

 

In the case of arterial damage where the blood vessels cannot conserve blood, it's a very fast moving problem and we all know damage to the right arteries can kill in just a few minutes. But we aren't discussing ruptured uterus problems or other extensive damages, are we? We are talking about a uterus which struggles to clamp down on veins.

 

Feel free to correct me with some good solid facts, but that's what I've been taught. And my UC friend's experience seems to back it up.

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#17 of 22 Old 07-14-2012, 05:36 AM
 
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Are you an experienced UC mama? Do you support UC?


Like I said, if you don't believe me, the internet is at your fingertips. I have a good freebirthing friend who had a serious PPH situation that required a long drive from the country out to the ER. She got there just fine, despite getting there in crummy shape. The OB at the ER did a gentle finger-sweep and the problem was solved, gave her some IV fluids and she went home to recover in bed. End of story. UC mamas do like a good ER from time to time.

 

I'm not going to say never is it fast, but you have to remember, far and away, the birth is a situation where it's not gushing arteries. Once a certain amount of blood loss occurs, conservation begins. Even a soldier laying for half a day on the battlefield with a bullet hole in him can wait for help in many a circumstance, and it's been found that pushing IV fluids on the scene interferes with natural body conservation of blood. This discovery means that it's more likely they would first transport to a place with surgical suits and blood replacements before attempting to raise his blood pressure with fluids again.

 

And that's for some extreme bleeding.

 

Bleeding carries the risk of falling pregnenolone levels, to the point where adrenal exhaustion can occur, damage to the hypothalmus, stroke and heart attacks, so I'm not downplaying blood loss here. But my midwife explained how slowly typical hemmorhage happens and I've not found contradictions online, myself. In fact, I have found information like the paragraph I wrote about battlefield injuries, which just serves to confirm what I've already been taught about PP blood loss.

 

In the case of arterial damage where the blood vessels cannot conserve blood, it's a very fast moving problem and we all know damage to the right arteries can kill in just a few minutes. But we aren't discussing ruptured uterus problems or other extensive damages, are we? We are talking about a uterus which struggles to clamp down on veins.

 

Feel free to correct me with some good solid facts, but that's what I've been taught. And my UC friend's experience seems to back it up.

 

No.  I'm just a doctor.  I don't know crap about hemorrhage.  My knowledge pales in comparison to your friend's UC experience.

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#18 of 22 Old 07-14-2012, 11:05 AM
 
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No.  I'm just a doctor.  I don't know crap about hemorrhage.  My knowledge pales in comparison to your friend's UC experience.


Well we all know doctors have a good grasp of UC and natural childbirth. Do you attend homebirths? Why are you on the UC board?

 

Can you point out some research, or even case studies rather than than using an "appeal to authority" method for convincing women?

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#19 of 22 Old 07-14-2012, 11:26 AM
 
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Well we all know doctors have a good grasp of UC and natural childbirth. Do you attend homebirths? Why are you on the UC board?

 

Can you point out some research, or even case studies rather than than using an "appeal to authority" method for convincing women?

 

This isn't about UC or natural childbirth.  It's about hemorrhage.  I'm not "on" the UC board, but your post came up in the new post list and I really felt the need to correct your egregious misinformation.  

 

I'm going to bow out now, so as to not further derail the OP's post.  

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#20 of 22 Old 07-14-2012, 11:39 AM
 
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I'm going to bow out now, so as to not further derail the OP's post.  

thanks :)


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#21 of 22 Old 07-14-2012, 12:08 PM
 
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This isn't about UC or natural childbirth.  It's about hemorrhage.  I'm not "on" the UC board, but your post came up in the new post list and I really felt the need to correct your egregious misinformation.  

 

I'm going to bow out now, so as to not further derail the OP's post.  


So long. Too bad your only argument was that you are a doctor. If you actually had something to teach us, you totally missed the chance.

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#22 of 22 Old 07-14-2012, 08:04 PM
 
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This thread is closed for review. Thank you for your patience.


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